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The Woman*s College of the 
University of North Carolina 







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BULLETIN 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1952-1953 
Announcements for 1953-1954 



VOLUME XLII APRIL, 1953 NUMBER 3 

PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES DURING THE YEAR IN 
JANUARY, FEBRUARY, APRIL, AND NOVEMBER BY 
THE COLLEGE AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



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Administration 

Alumnae House 

Anna M. Gove Infirmary* 

Auditorium* 

Aycock Auditorium* 

Chancellor's Home . 

Curry Building 

Dining Halls and Kitchen 

Golf Hut 

Gym, Outdoor 

Gymnasium, Rosenthal* ... 
Home Economics Building 
Infirmary, Anna M. Gove* 

Laundry, New 

Laundry, Old 

Library, New 

Library, Old 

Mclver Building 

Music Building 

Nursery School 

Power Plant 

Practice Houses 

Rosenthal Gymnasium* 

Science Building „ 31 

Soda Shop _ 24 

Student Union 19 



BUILDINGS 

33 Residence Halls 

. 25 Anna Howard Shaw* 

Bailey 

Coil* 

Cotten 

Foust* 

Gray* 

Hinshaw 

Jamison 

Kirkland 

Laura Coit* ... 



13 



35 



15, 34, 36 

2 



Mclver House 25A 

Mary Foust* 29 

MendenhallRagsdale* ... 12 

New GuilfonI 21 

North Spencer* 22 

Ragsdale* 12 

Shaw* .8 

South Spencer" .... 23 

Spencer, North* 22 

Spencer, South 5 23 

Weil-Winfield* 4 

Winficld* 4 

Woman's . 14 



INFIIUAARY S ,HOT 



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CHANCEIiOR'S- 1 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwomans19531954 



BULLETIN OF 

THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1952-1953 
Announcements for 1953-1954 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE 

AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA, FEBRUARY 24, 1936 

UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912 



1953 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S Ml T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
19 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 



1954 



JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1953 

June 8, Monday- 
June 9, Tuesday 
July 17, Friday 
August 14, Friday 
September 11, Friday 
9 :00 a.m. 

September 14, Monday 
8 :00 a.m. 

September 15, Tuesday 

8 :30 a.m. 

9 :30 a.m. 

10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
2 :00 p.m. 

September 16, Wednesday 
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

September 17, Thursday 
September 24, Thursday 
October 5, Monday 
November 2, Monday 
November 25, Wednesday 
10 :00 a.m. 

November 30, Monday 
8 :00 a.m. 

December 19, Saturday 
12 :00 noon 

1954 

January 4, Monday 

8:00 a.m. 
January 11, Monday 

January 18, Monday 

January 19-25, Tuesday-Monday 

January 26, Tuesday 

January 27, Wednesday 
8:30 a.m. 
8 :30 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
1 :30 p.m.-4 :30 p.m. 

January 28, Thursday 
10:00 a.m.-4 :00 p.m. 

January 29, Friday 
8 :00 a.m. 

February 5, Friday 

March 15, Monday 

March 27, Saturday 
12 :00 noon 

April 5, Monday 
8 :00 a.m. 

May 6, Thursday 

May 21, Friday 

May 22-28, Saturday-Friday 

May 29-31, Saturday-Monday 

June 7, Monday 

July 16, Friday 

August 13, Friday 



Session 1953-1954 

Summer Session registration 

Instruction begins 

Six-weeks' Summer Session ends 

Ten-weeks' Summer Session ends 

Faculty meeting 

Freshman Week begins 

Freshmen consult advisers 

Examinations to remove condition grades ; proficiency 
examinations 

Sophomores consult advisers 
Juniors and seniors consult advisers 
Freshmen complete registration 
Registration of commercial students 

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors complete registration 

Instruction begins 

Last day for changes in courses 

Founder's Day 

Six-weeks' reports due in Registrar's office 

Instruction ends 

Instruction resumes 

Instruction ends 



Instruction resumes 

Last day for filing applications for proficiency examina- 
tions and condition examinations 
Reading day 
Examinations 
Registration of commercial students 

Freshmen consult advisers 
Juniors and seniors consult advisers 
Sophomores consult advisers 
Freshmen complete registration 

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors complete registration 

Instruction begins 

Last day for changes in courses 

Six-weeks' reports due in Registrar's office 

Instruction ends 

Instruction resumes 

Last day for filing applications for proficiency examina- 
tions and condition examinations 
Reading day 
Examinations 
Commencement 
Summer Session begins 
Six-weeks' Summer Session ends 
Ten-weeks' Summer Session ends 



1859 



ci.3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. Organization 5 

Trustees 5 

Officers of Administration 9 

Officers of Instruction 10 

Standing Committees 30 

II. The College 33 

III. Expenses 48 

IV. Admission 62 

V. Degrees 64 

VI. Academic Regulations 78 

VII. Courses of Instruction 84 

VIII. The Graduate School 216 

IX. Degrees Conferred 227 

X. Student List 241 

XI. Index 321 



I. ORGANIZATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF 

The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 

Greensboro 
The State College of Agriculture and Engineering of the 

University of North Carolina, Raleigh 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

William B. Umstead, Governor, Chairman ex officio, Raleigh 

Arch Turner Allen, Secretary, Raleigh 

1 1954: John W. Umstead, Jr., Chapel Hill; John W. Clark, Frank- 

linville; W. Frank Taylor, Goldsboro. 
!1956: John Sprunt Hill, Durham; Edwin Pate, Laurinburg; John J. 

Parker, Charlotte 
U958: Mrs. Laura Weill Cone, Greensboro; Mrs. May L. Tomlinson, 

High Point; Victor S. Bryant, Durham 
^960 : Thomas J. Pearsall, Rocky Mount; Clarence Poe, Raleigh; 

A. H. Harris, Oriental 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

William B. Umstead, Governor, Chairman ex officio 

Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

ex officio 
Arch Turner Allen, Secretary 

TRUSTEES FOR LIFE 

Cameron Morrison, Governor, 1921-1925 
Clyde R. Hoey, Governor, 1937-1941 
Robert Gregg Cherry, Governor, 1945-1949 
W. Kerr Scott, Governor, 1949-1953 
Governor William B. Umstead, 1953-1957 



Term 

Wade Barber 
Samuel M. Blount 
Victor S. Bryant 
Miss Gertrude Carraway 
John W. Clark 
Collier Cobb, Jr. 
George S. Coble 
Mrs. Laura Weill Cone 
John G. Dawson 
Joseph C. Eagles 
John Sprunt Hill 
B. K. Lassiter 



Expires April 1, 1953 

Pittsboro Chatham 

Washington Beaufort 

Durham Durham 

New Bern Craven 

Franklinville Randolph 

Chapel Hill Orange 

Lexington Davidson 

Greensboro Guilford 

Kinston Lenoir 

Wilson Wilson 

Durham Durham 

Oxford Granville 



1 Term expires April 1 of year indicated. 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



John Q. LeGrand 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


Henry A. Lineberger 


Belmont 


Gaston 


Reid Atwood Maynard 


Burlington 


Alamance 


Mrs. Frances Newsom Miller 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Glenn C. Palmer 


Clyde 


Haywood 


Edwin Pate 


Laurinburg 


Scotland 


James C. Pittman 


Sanford 


Lee 


J. E. Ramsey 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


Roy Rowe 


Burgaw 


Pender 


J. Benton Stacy 


Ruffin 


Rockingham 


Kenneth S. Tanner 


Spindale 


Rutherford 


William B. Um stead 


Durham 


Durham 


E. Leigh Winslow 


Hertford 


Perquimans 


Term Expires April 1, 1955 




H. D. Bateman 


Wilson 


Wilson 


James H. Clark 


Elizabethtown 


Bladen 


Wilbur H. Currie 


Carthage 


Moore 


P. B. Ferrebee 


Andrews 


Cherokee 


Ben E. Fountain 


Rocky Mount 


Edgecombe 


0. Max Gardner, Jr. 


Shelby 


Cleveland 


John G. H. Geitner 


Hickory 


Catawba 


H. S. GIBBS 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


A. H. Harris 


Oriental 


Pamlico 


Ira T. Johnston 


Jefferson 


Ashe 


Vernon G. James 


Elizabeth City 


Pasquotank 


John H. Kerr, Jr. 


Warrenton 


Warren 


John C. Kesler 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


M. C. Lassiter 


Snow Hill 


Greene 


J. Spencer Love 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


W. L. Lumpkin 


Louisburg 


Franklin 


H. B. Marrow 


Smithfield 


Johnston 


L. P. McLendon 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


William D. Merritt 


Roxboro 


Person 


J. F. MlLLIKEN 


Monroe 


Union 


Rudolph I. Mintz 


Wilmington 


New Hanover 


Mrs. Rosa B. Parker 


Albemarle 


Stanly 


Clarence Poe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


George M. Stephens 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


John W. Umstead, Jr. 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


Term Expires April 1, 1957 




David Clark 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


2 Clyde K. Council 


Wananish 


Columbus 


B. B. Everett 


Palmyra 


Halifax 


Mrs. R. S. Ferguson 


Taylorsville 


Alexander 


James S. Ficklen 


Greenville 


Pitt 



2 Deceased. 





Trustees 




3James A. Gray 


Winston-Salem 


Forsyth 


Harry A. Greene 


Raeford 


Hoke 


F. D. B. Harding 


Yadkinville 


Yadkin 


R. L. Harris 


Roxboro 


Person 


Mrs. Albert Lathrop 


Asheville 


Buncombe 


R. E. Little 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


G. N. Noble 


Trenton 


Jones 


Thomas J. Pearsall 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


H. L. Riddle, Jr. 


Morganton 


Burke 


John C. Rodman 


Washington 


Beaufort 


Benjamin Franklin Royal 


Morehead City 


Carteret 


C. Wayland Spruill 


Windsor 


Bertie 


Mrs. Chas. W. Stanford 


Chapel Hill, Rt. 1 


Orange 


John P. Stedman 


Lumberton 


Robeson 


H. P. Taylor 


Wadesboro 


Anson 


W. Frank Taylor 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


Mrs. May L. Tomlinson 


High Point 


Guilford 


F. E. Wallace 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


David Livingston Ward 


New Bern 


Craven 


James L. Woodson 


Salisbury 


Rowan 


Term Expires April 1, 1959 




Arch Turner Allen 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Mrs. Edward M. Anderson 


West Jefferson 


Ashe 


William C. Barfield 


Wilmington 


New Hanover 


Kemp Davis Battle 


Rocky Mount 


Nash 


Jack F. Blythe 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


Charles Albert Cannon 


Concord 


Cabarrus 


William Grimes Clark 


Tarboro 


Edgecombe 


Mrs. Nancy Hall Copeland 


Murfreesboro 


Hertford 


W. T. Harris 


Troy 


Montgomery 


Hugh Horton 


Williamston 


Martin 


Paul E. Jones 


Farmville 


Pitt 


Arthur H. London 


Pittsboro 


Chatham 


Andrew L. Monroe 


Raleigh 


Wake 


Kemp Battle Nixon 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


John J. Parker 


Charlotte 


Mecklenburg 


J. Hampton Price 


Leaksville 


Rockingham 


3 J. T. Pritchett 


Lenoir 


Caldwell 


Claude W. Rankin 


Fayetteville 


Cumberland 


William P. Saunders 


Aberdeen 


Moore 


Fred I. Sutton 


Kinston 


Lenoir 


Shahane R. Taylor 


Greensboro 


Guilford 


Herman Weil 


Goldsboro 


Wayne 


R. Lee Whitmire 


Hendersonville 


Henderson 


Hill Yarborough 


Louisburg 


Franklin 


J. Robert Young 


Dunn 


Harnett 



"Deceased. 



THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

(Office at Chapel Hill) 

Gordon Gray, B.A., LL.B., LL.D., President. 

William Donald Carmichael, Jr., S.B., Comm., Vice-President and 

Controller. 
4 Logan Wilson, A.M., Ph.D., Vice-President and Provost. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

Woman's College at Greensboro 

Edward Kidder Graham, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor. 
Rene Hardre, C.E.N., C.A.P., Professor of French. 
Vance T. Littlejohn, B.A., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., 

Professor of Business Education. 
James W. Painter, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 
Victor M. Cutter, Jr., B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Robert Burton House, B.A., M.A., LL.D., Chancellor. 

Gordon Williams Blackwell, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Profesor of Sociology 

and Director of the Institute for Research in Social Science. 
Clifford Pierson Lyons, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of English. 
William M. Whyburn, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Kenan Professor of 

Mathematics. 
Hugh T. Lefler, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of History. 



North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering at Raleigh 

John William Harrelson, B.E., M.E., LL.D., Chancellor. 
David Eldridge Henderson, Jr., B.S., Professor of Industrial 

Engineering. 
Preston William Edsall, B.S., M.A., Head of Department and 

Professor of History and Political Science. 
Carey Hoyt Bostian, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology and 

Director of Instruction for the School of Agriculture. 
Clarence C. Scarborough, B.S., M.S., M.Ed., Professor of 

Agricultural Education. 



'Resigned January 81, 1953. 

8 



THE FACULTY 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

(Date of appointment to faculty indicated after each name.) 

Gordon Gray (1950), President of the University. 

B.A., North Carolina ; LL.B., Yale ; LL.D., North Carolina. 

Edward Kidder Graham (1950), Chancellor. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., CornelL 

Katherine Taylor (1929), Dean of Students. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Radcliffe. 

Mereb E. Mossman (1937), Dean of Instruction. 

B.A., Morningside ; M.A., Chicago. 

Charles Edward Prall (1949), Dean of the School of Education, 
Director of Summer Session. 

B.A., Iowa ; M.A., Chicago ; Ph.D., Iowa. 

Katherine E. Roberts (1952), Dean of the School of Home Economics. 

B.A., Kentucky ; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Franklin Holbrook McNutt (1914), Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School of the University. 

B.A., M.A., Wittenberg ; Ph.D., Ohio State ; LL.D., Dayton. 

John C. Lockhart (1943), Assistant Controller and Business Manager. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

George M. Joyce (1935), Auditor. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers ; M.S., Indiana. 

Ruth M. Collings (1925), Physician. 

B.A., Pomona ; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

Mildred P. Newton (1926), Director of Admissions and Acting 
Registrar 

B.A., Goucher. 

Charles Wiley Phillips (1935), Director of Public Relations. 

B.A., North Carolina ; M.A., Columbia. 

Charles Marshall Adams (1945), Librarian. 

B.A., Amherst; B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

OFFICERS EMERITI 

Margaret Edwards, Professor Emeritus of Home Economics. 

B.S., Montana State; M.A., Columbia. 

Ruth Fitzgerald, Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women ; B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

John Paul Givler, Professor Emeritus of Biology. 

Ph.B., M.A., Hamline. 

9 



10 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Mildred Rutherford Gould, Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

Earl H. Hall, Professor Emeritus of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., Chicago. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, Chancellor Emeritus. 

B.S., LL.D., Mercer; L.H.D., Bennett. 

Herbert Kimmel, Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. 

B.A., Indiana ; Ph.M., Chicago ; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Betty Aiken Land, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

Miriam MacFayden, Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women ; B.S., M.S., Columbia. 

William Woodrow Martin, Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Ph.B., M.A., Chicago. 

Grace Van Dyke More, Professor Emeritus of Music. 

B.Mus., M.S., Illinois. 

Victoria Carlson Nielson, Professor Emeritus of Health. 

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Columbia. 

Mollie Anne Peterson, Associate Professor Emeritus of Art. 

Ph.B., Chicago ; M.A., Columbia. 

Mary M. Petty, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

B.S., Wellesley. 

Caroline B. Schoch, Professor Emeritus of German. 

Ph.B., Chicago ; M.A., Columbia. 

Cornelia Strong, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

B.A., Cornell ; M.A., Michigan. 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 

(Arranged alphabetically with the exception of the first two.) 

Gordon Gray (1950), President of the University. 

B.A., North Carolina ; LL.B., Yale ; LL.D., North Carolina. 

Edward Kidder Graham (1950), Chancellor. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Alice Katherine Abbott (1927), Associate Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., Smith ; M.A., Illinois ; Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

Charles Marshall Adams (1945), Librarian, Professor. 

B.A., Amherst; B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

Elizabeth Adams (1949), Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Middlebury; M.A., Smith; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State. 

Maude L. Adams (1937), Assistant Professor of Business Education. 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Iowa. 

Louise Brevard Alexander (1935), Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

B.A., Presbyterian College. 



Faculty 11 

1 LAURA G. Anderton (1948), Instructor in Biology. 

B.A., Wellesley; M.S., Brown. 

Edna Arundel (1937), Professor of Geography. 

B.A., Ohio; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Yale. 

i Warren Ashby (1949), Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

B.A., Maryville; B.D., Ph.D., Yale. 

Claire Henley Atkisson (1917), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College; (Columbia, pupil of 
Karl Bon dam, Austin Conradi, and Lotta Hough). 

Harold Fenton AtKisson (1952), Assistant Professor of Music. 

A.B., Mus.B., Drury College; M.A., The Eastman School of Music. 

Audrey Turner Austin (1952), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Mary Elizabeth Avent (1952), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

2 Anita A. Ay ala (1950), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., New Mexico ; M.A., National University of Mexico. 

3 Helen H. Bacon (1951), Instructor in Classical Civilization. 

B.A., Bryn Mawr. 

Willard Everett Barchenger (1952), Instructor in Art. 

B.A., Washington; (Academie Frochot, Paris). 

3 RlCHARD Bardolph (1944), Associate Professor of History. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Susan Barksdale (1943), Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., Columbia. 

Winfield Supply Barney (1919), Professor of Romance Languages. 

B.A., Dartmouth ; M.A., Hobart ; Ph.D., Syracuse. 

Julia Byrum Barrett (1952), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Madie Ward Barrett (1950), Lecturer in German. 

B.A., Alabama College for Women ; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

William Robert Barrett (1948), Assistant Professor of German. 

B.A., The Citadel; M.A., Duke; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Elva Eudora Barrow (1916), Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.S., Chicago. 

Helen Barton (1927), Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Goucher ; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

John Herbert Beeler (1950), Instructor in History. 

B.A., M.A , Ohio ; Ph.D., Cornell. 

4 Elizabeth Lamb Bertram (1952), Lecturer in Education. 

A.B., Kentucky ; M.A., Columbia. 



J On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 
designed August 31, 1952. 
3 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 
4 First semester, 1952-1953. 



12 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Olga Maria Bibza (1952), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.A., State Conservatory of Prague, Czechoslovakia. 

Frederick Harrison Binford (1952), Instructor in Physics. 

B.S., Guilford College. 

Wayne Bowman (1947), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Elon ; M.A. (English), M.A. (Dramatic Arts), North Carolina. 

John E. Bridgers, Jr. (1938), Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Harvard; Ph.D., Duke. 

5 Alma Browning (1948), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody. 

Rita Anne Burdett (1948), Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., New Jersey State Teachers College, Trenton ; M.A., New York. 

5 Mary Patricia Burgan (1951), Instructor in Physics. 

B.A., Mary Manse College; M.S., St. Louis. 

Rita Mary Burke (1952), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal ; M.A., Columbia. 

Helen Burns (1937), Freshman Class Chairman, Associate Professor. 

B.A., Iowa ; M.A., Columbia. 

May Dulaney Bush (1934), Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Hollins ; M.A., Columbia ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

5 John Campbell Cairns (1951), Instructor in History. 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Oliver Perry Clutts (1924), Professor of Education. 

B.S., Ohio; M.A., Columbia. 

Inez Coldwell (1922), Associate Professor of Biology. 

B.A., Southwestern. 

Ruth M. Collings (1925), Physician and Professor of Health. 

B.A., Pomona ; M.D., Pennsylvania. 

5 Carolyn C. Comings (1951), Instructor in Sociology. 

B.A., Smith College ; M.A., Connecticut. 

5 John Earl Courtney (1941), Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.S., N. E. Missouri State ; M.A., Colorado State College of Education ; Ph.D., 
Columbia. 

Elizabeth Cowling (1945), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.A., Carleton ; M.A., Columbia ; M.M., Northwestern ; (Studied with Dudley 
Powers, Luigi Silva, Pablo Casals). 

Elsie Jane Cox (1947), Instructor in Physics. 

R.N., Park View Hospital, Rocky Mount, N. C. ; Diploma, Hospital Division, Duke. 

Evelyn M. Cox (1948), Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., M.S., Syracuse. 

Agnes N. Coxe (1927), Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.L., Flora Macdonald; B.S., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Columbia. 



"Resigned August 31, 1952. 



Faculty 13 

6 Mary Eleanor Craig (1949), Instructor in Economics. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina. 

Victor Macomber Cutter, Jr. (1952), Professor of Biology. 

A.B., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Helen Frances Cutting (1931), Assistant Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., Adelphi ; M.A., Columbia ; M.A., Chicago ; Certificate, Centro de Estudios 
Historicos, Madrid. 

Frances R. Daily (1945), Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Lenoir Rhyne ; M.A., North Carolina. 

7 Jane Wharton Darnell (1948), Instructor in Music. 

B.S.M., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; Diploma, Juilliard 
School of Music; (pupil of Mack Harrill). 

sRobert Arthur Darnell (1949), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., Colorado ; M.Mus., Texas ; Certificate, Ecoles des Beaux Arts, Fontaine- 
bleau, France; (pupil of Robert Casadesus, Carl Friedberg, Nadia Boulanger). 

Dorothy Davis (1930), Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., Western College ; M.A., Wisconsin. 

Emma Lu Davis (1951), Lecturer in Art. 

Diploma, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts ; B.A., Vassar. 

Charlotte W. Dawley (1944), Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., Carleton ; M.S., Washington University ; Ph.D., Minnesota. 

Helen M. Deane (1950), Associate Physician. 

B.A., Carleton ; B.S., M.B., M.D., Minnesota. 

Ouida Debter (1952), Instructor in Commercial Department. 

B.S., Alabama ; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Susan Goodwin Delony (1951), Instructor in Home Economics. 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute ; M.S., Cornell. 

Marie B. Denneen (1926), Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., M.A., Minnesota. 

William C. DeVeny (1946), Associate Professor of Music. 

B.A., North Central ; B.Mus., Oberlin Conservatory. 

Margaret C. DeVinny (1946), Assistant Professor in Commercial 
Department. 

B.S., Kansas State ; M.S., Tennessee. 

George W. Dickieson (1938), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., Salem ; M.Mus., Cincinnati Conservatory. 

9 Marilyn Dickson (1951), Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Wheelock College. 

Bernice Evelyn Draper (1922), Professor of History. 

B.A., Lawrence ; M.A., Wisconsin. 

Elizabeth Duffy (1937), Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 



6 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 
^Resigned August 31, 1952. 
8 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 
designed August 31, 1952. 



14 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

James Arthur Dunn (1923), Professor of English. 

B.A., M.A., Missouri. 

Lewis J. Edinger (1952), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., Wabash College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia. 

C. Franklin Eicher (1948), Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., B.S., Ohio State; M.A., Chicago; Ph.D., Duke. 

Kathryn McA. England (1942), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College ; M.A., Columbia. 

Virginia Christian Farinholt (1935), Associate Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., William and Mary ; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago. 

William N. Felt (1947), Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

B.A., Clark; M.A., D. M. L., Middlebury; Diplome de hautes etudes, Grenoble. 

Angelo Fergerson (1950), Assistant Professor in Commercial 
Department. 

B.S., Alabama State Teachers College, Florence; M.B.A., Indiana. 

Mary Fitzgerald (1924), Assistant Professor of Education. 

Diploma, North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College ; B.A., North Caro- 
lina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

10 Evelyn Fowler (1944), Assistant Professor of Business Education. 

B.A., Catawba ; M.S., North Carolina. 

Lois Elizabeth Frazier (1952), Instructor in Economics. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.S., North Carolina. 

n MARC Friedlaender (1937), Professor of English. 

B.A., Princeton ; M. A., Harvard ; Ph.D., Chicago. 

Jane Carpenter Frost (1949), Instructor in Biology. 

B.A., Oberlin ; M.A., Ohio Wesleyan. 

Annxe Beam Funderburk (1921), Assistant Professor of French. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Virginia Gangstad (1939), Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Roslyn Garfield (1951), Assistant Professor of Health. 

B.S., New York; M.A., Columbia. 

12Dewey Wesley Grantham, Jr. (1950), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., Georgia; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Lawrence Lester Graves (1950), Instructor in History. 

B.A., Missouri ; M.A., Rochester. 

Margaret Greene (1946), Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S. Appalachian. 

Ellen Jeanne Griffin (1940), Assistant Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 



10 Resigned August 31, 1952. 

u On leave of absence second semester, 1952-1953. 

^Resigned August 31, 1952. 



Faculty 15 

Philip Mahone Griffith (1950), Instructor in English. 

B.A., North Carolina ; M.A., Johns Hopkins. 

Ione Holt Grogan (1935), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

Magnhilde Gullander (1918), Professor of History. 

B.A., Wisconsin ; M.A., Pennsylvania. 

Ruth Gunter (1931), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College ; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

James J. Hagood, Jr. (1951), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., Piedmont ; M.A., Peabody. 

Alonzo C. Hall (1916), Professor of English. 

B.A., Elon ; M.A., Columbia. 

Mathilde Hardaway (1941), Assistant Professor of Business Education. 

B.B.A., Texas; M.B.A., Chicago; Ph.D., Yale. 

Noma Hardin (1944), Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.A., Baylor; B.S., M.A., Texas State College for Women. 

Josefina Escajeda Hardre (1946), Instructor in Romance Languages. 

B.A., Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy ; M.A., Colorado College. 

Ren£ Hardre (1925), Professor of French. 

C.E.N., Angers ; C.A.P., Rennes ; Professorat des Ecoles Normales, Paris. 

Hilda T. Harpster (1944), Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.A., Sweet Briar ; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan. 

Mary Harrell (1935), Assistant Professor in Commercial Department. 

B.A., Queens, N. C. ; B.S., George Peabody ; M.A., New York. 

Mildred Pearl Harris (1924), Associate Professor of Health. 

B.A., M.A., Michigan. 

13 Martha Elizabeth Hathaway (1936), Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics. 

B.S., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

Josephine Hege (1934), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Virginia. 

Julia Heil Heinlein (1952), Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Gail Murl Hennis (1950), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., Purdue ; M.A., Iowa. 

James Albert Highsmith (1916), Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina ; Ph.D., George Peabody. 

Robert G. Hocker (1948), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania. 

Birdie Helen Hollow ay (1935), Associate Professor of Music Educa- 
tion. 

B.S.M., M.S.M., Oberlin Conservatory. 



18 On leave of absence first semester, 1952-1953. 



16 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Sara L. Holroyd (1952), Instructor in Music. 

B.S., George Peabody College; M.A., Columbia. 

Malcolm K. Hooke (1922), Professor of Romance Languages. 

B.A., Chattanooga ; Diplome d'6tudes de civilisation frangaise ; Docteur de l'Uni- 
versite' de Paris. 

Sarah Saunders Hopper (1951), Instructor in Education, Librarian in 
Curry School. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; B.S. in L.S., Louis- 
iana State University. 

Evelyn Louise Howell (1937), Associate Professor of Home 
Economics. 

B.S., North Carolina College for Women ; M.S., North Carolina. 

13 Edith Huffman (1945), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., Lenoir Rhyne ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Ligia D. Hunt (1948), Instructor in Romance Languages. 

B.A., Puerto Rico. 

14 Allene Wall Hunter (1952), Instructor in Home Economics. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Eugenia McIver Hunter (1935), Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., Goucher; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Ohio State. 

Mary Alford Hunter (1943), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Leonard Burwell Hurley (1921), Professor of English. 

B.A., M.A., Duke; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

14 Mary Kathleen Huse (1947), Instructor in Psychology. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina. 

Helen Ingraham (1923), Professor of Biology. 

B.S., Knox; M.S., Chicago. 

Sarah M. Ingram (1951), Instructor in Music. 

B.M., Greensboro College; (Juilliard). 

Meyer William Isenberg (1952), Lecturer in the Humanities. 

B.A., Ph.D., Chicago. 

Gregory D. Ivy (1935), Professor of Art. 

B.S., Central Missouri State ; M.A., Columbia. 

14 Mackie Langham Jarrell (1947), Instructor in English. 

B.A., M.A., Texas. 

15 Randall Jarrel (1947), Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt. 

Elisabeth Jastrow (1941), Assistant Professor of Art. 

Ph.D., Heidelberg, Germany. 

Glenn R. Johnson (1923), Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Reed ; M.A., Columbia. 



13 On leave of absence first semester, 1952-1953. 
"Resigned August 31, 1952. 
15 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



Faculty 17 

16 Guy Benton Johnson, Jr. (1951), Instructor in Sociology. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Miriam Massey Johnson (1951), Instructor in Sociology. 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Radcliffe. 

May Belle Jones (1952), Visiting Lecturer in Business Education. 

A.B., M.A., North Carolina. 

Sarah Wilson Jones (1952), Instructor in Business Education. 

B.S., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

George M. Joyce (1935), Auditor, Professor. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers ; M.S., Indiana. 

Elizabeth Marguerite Kaiser (1952), Director of Cafeteria, 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.A., DePauw; M.S., Cornell. 

Pauline Evelyn Keeney (1949), Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State. 

Cathryne Bradford Kehoe (1943), Assistant Professor of 
Home Economics. 

B.S., William and Mary; M.S., North Carolina. 

Albert S. Keister (1924), Professor of Economics. 

B.A., Otterbein ; M.A., Columbia ; Ph.D., Chicago. 

!7Duane P. Kline (1947), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.S., State Teachers, Indiana, Pa.; M.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Pro- 
fessional Diploma, Columbia; (Oberlin). 

Anna M. Kreimeier (1927), Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., Chicago ; M.A., Columbia. 

M. Josephine Kremer (1948), Professor of Home Economics. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan ; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Robert James Laffin (1952), Research Instructor in Biology. 

B.S., Yale. 

18 Francis Anthony Laine (1949), Assistant Professor of Classical 

Civilization. 

B.S., Memphis State; Ph.D., Vanderbilt. 

Vera Largent (1923), Professor of History. 

B.A., Knox ; M.A., Chicago. 

Augustine LaRochelle (1922), Professor of Spanish. 

B.A., Vermont ; M.A., Columbia ; Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

19 Emma McCloy Layman (1947), Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., Oberlin ; M.A., New York ; Ph.D., Iowa. 

Marjorie Leonard (1941), Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 



"Resigned January 31, 1952. 
"Resigned August 31, 1952. 
18 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 
"Resigned August 31, 1952. 



18 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Anne Louise Lewis (1945), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.S., Ph.D., Chicago. 

Elizabeth Ann Liddle (1950), Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Wheelock. 

Virgil E. Lindsey (1940), Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.A., Missouri Wesleyan ; M.A., Iowa. 

Vance T. Littlejohn (1938), Professor of Business Education. 

B.A., B.S., Bowling Green; M.E&, Ph.D., Pittsburgh. 

John C. Lockhart (1943), Assistant Controller and Business Manager, 

Professor. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Lila Belle Love (1926), Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women ; M.S., Nebraska. 

Louise Lowe (1941), Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women ; M.S., Georgia. 

Kathryn Luttgens (1951), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., New Jersey College for Women ; M.S., Wellesley. 

Johanna Boet McCartney (1952), Instructor, Nursery School. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., State Univer- 
sity of Iowa. 

Kenneth S. McCutchan (1951), Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., B.S., Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Kathryn W. McEntire (1951), Instructor in Commercial Department. 

B.A., Duke; M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Franklin Holbrook McNutt (1941), Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School of the University, Professor of Education. 

B.A., M.A., Wittenberg; Ph.D., Ohio State; LL.D., Dayton. 

Robie Mayhew Macauley (1950), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Kenyon ; M.F.A., Iowa. 

Guita Marble (1940), Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Kansas. 

Ethel L. Martus (1931), Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., Brown; M.S., Wellesley. 

Harriett Mehaffie (1929), Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., Chicago; M.A., Michigan. 

Jeanne Cummins Mellinger (1952), Instructor in Psychology. 

B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Chicago. 

Meta Helena Miller (1922), Professor of Romance Languages. 

B.A., Goucher ; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins ; Certificat d' etudes pratiques de pro- 
nonciation frangaise de phonetique, Universite de Paris. 

Alleine Richard Minor (1913), Professor of Piano. 

Diploma, Meredith; B.S., Columbia; (New England Conservatory of Music). 

Franklin A. Moody (1951), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Florida Southern College; M.Ed., Florida. 



Faculty 19 

Virginia G. Moomaw (1945), Associate Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., Nebraska; M.A., Columbia; (Bennington, Mills, New York Studios of 
Martha Graham, Charles Weidman, Doris Humphrey, and Jose Limon ; Dance 
Notation Bureau). 

Inga Borgstrom Morgan (1946), Instructor in Music. 

B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music. 

Phillip Morgan (1946), Assistant Professor of Piano. 

B.M., Tulsa ; M.M., Eastman School of Music ; (study with Helen Ringo. Guy 
Maier, Max Landow. Egon Petri). 

Mereb E. Mossman (1937), Dean of Instruction, Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Morningside ; M.A., Chicago. 

William R. Mueller (1951), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Princeton ; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard. 

20 Lenore Rhona O'Boyle (1948), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., Bryn Mawr; M.A., Yale; Ph.D., Radcliffe. 

John Opper (1952), Associate Professor of Art. 

B.S., Cleveland School of Art and Western Reserve ; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia. 

James W. Painter (1926), Professor of English. 

B.A., Emory and Henry ; M.A., Tennessee. 

Kathleen S. Painter (1929), Instructor in English. 

B.A., Tennessee. 

Herbert W. Park (1936), Instructor in Physical Education. 

(Springfield; Columbia.) 

Franklin D. Parker (1951), Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., Greenville; M.A., Ph.D., Illinois. 

Jessie Peden (1946), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., Winthrop ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Ellen Penn (1946), Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers ; M.A., Columbia. 

21 Edwin Noel Perrin (1953), Instructor in English. 

A.B., Williams College; M.A., Duke. 

22 Eugene E. Pfaff (1936), Professor of History. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina; Ph.D., Cornell. 

Charles Wiley Phillips (1935), Director of Public Relations, Profes- 
sor. 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Columbia. 

Coy T. Phillips (1944), Associate Professor of Geography. 

B.A., North Carolina; M.A., Colorado; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Viva M. Playfoot (1925), Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

Nancy Ann Porter (1952), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



20 On leave of absence 1952-1953. 
21 Second Semester, 1952-1953. 
22 0n leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



20 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

23 Jeannette R. Potter (1942), Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers ; M.S., Wisconsin. 

Charles Edward Prall (1949), Dean of the School of Education, Direc- 
tor of Summer Session, Professor of Education. 

B.A., Iowa ; M.A., Chicago ; Ph.D., Iowa. 

Thomas Hayes Procter (1952), Visiting Professor of Philosophy. 

B.A., Manchester University, England ; Ph.D., Harvard. 

Anna Joyce Reardon (1941), Professor of Physics. 

B.A., College of Saint Teresa ; M.S., Ph.D., St. Louis. 

Anna Reger (1931), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan ; B.S. in L.S., Columbia. 

William Nelson Renfroe (1951), Instructor in Economics. 

B.S., M.S., Georgia School of Technology. 

24 David Rigsby (1953), Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Western Kentucky State; M.S., University of Kentucky. 

Marie Iris Riley (1952), Instructor in Education. 

B.S., State Teachers College, New York; M.A., Iowa. 

Katherine E. Roberts (1952), Dean of the School of Home Economics, 
Professor of Home Economics. 

B.A., Kentucky ; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Hollis J. Rogers (1947), Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., Murray State College, Kentucky ; M.S., Kentucky ; Ph.D., Duke. 

Lettie Hamlett Rogers (1940), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Bess Naylor Rosa (1934), Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., M.A., Missouri. 

Abigail E. Rowley (1922), Associate Professor of English. 

B.S., Denison ; M.A., Columbia. 

Alice J. Ryan (1943), Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Florence Louise Schaeffer (1922), Professor of Chemistry. 

B.A., Barnard ; M.A., Mount Holyoke. 

25 Jean Marie Schneck (1948), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., Oberlin Conservatory; (Juilliard). 

Alice Schriver (1949), Associate Professor and Head, Health Instruc- 
tion Division. 

B.S., M.A., New York; Ed.D., Columbia. 

26 Joanne Elizabeth Scott (1951), Instructor in English. 

B.A., Vassar ; M.A., New York State College for Teachers. 



^Resigned August 31, 1952. 
24 Second Semester, 1952-1953. 
^Resigned August 31, 1952. 
^Resigned August 31, 1952. 



Faculty 21 

Miriam Elizabeth Secor (1952), Instructor in Commercial Department. 

B.S., Boston ; M.S., Florida State University. 

Archie D. Shaftesbury (1924), Professor of Zoology. 

B.A., Southwestern ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Anne Shamburger (1925), Assistant Professor of Health. 

(Guilford ; Johns Hopkins.) 

Ruth Agnes Shaver (1937) , Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan ; M.A., Columbia. 

Lyda Gordon Shivers (1933), Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., LL.B., M.A., Mississippi ; Ph.D., North Carolina. 

26 Emeve Paul Singletary (1934), Instructor, Nursery School. 

B.S., North Carolina College for Women. 

Elizabeth Barwick Sink (1947), Instructor in English. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 

2 7Blair Leland Smith (1949), Lecturer in Design. 

Certificate in Industrial Design, Chouinard Art Institute. 

John Aaron Smith (1927), Associate Professor of Education. 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University; M.S., Illinois. 

Sara Elizabeth Smith (1948), Instructor in Sociology. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Indiana, Pa. ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Tommie Lou Smith (1951), Instructor in Business Education. 

B.A., M.A., East Carolina. 

28 Nancy Snider (1953), Instructor in English. 

A.B., M.A., Michigan. 

Gaynell Callaway Spivey (1940), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Greensboro ; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Patty Spruill (1923), Associate Professor of Business Education. 

B.S., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College ; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women ; M.A., New York. 

Helen Knott Staley (1949), Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.I., Louisiana Polytechnic Institute ; B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

Madeleine Blakey Street (1930), Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

B.S., William and Mary; M.A., Columbia. 

29 Alice Adelia Suiter (1950), Instructor in Physical Edducation. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Jane Summerell (1926), Professor of English. 

B.A., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College ; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

Helen Kirk Surratt (1939), Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 



20 Resigned August 31, 1952. 
'"First semester, 1952-1953. 
^Second semester, 1952-1953. 
^Resigned August 31, 1952. 



22 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Mabel N. Swanson (1938), Director of Dining Halls, Professor of 
Home Economics. . 

B.S., Washington ; M.S., Columbia. 

Katherine Taylor (1929), Dean of Students, Professor 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Radcliffe. 

30p E TER Hillsman Taylor (1946), Assistant Professor of English. 

B.A., Kenyon. 

William Raymond Taylor (1921), Professor of English. 

B.A., North Carolina ; M.A., Harvard. 

Albert Frederick Thiel (1931), Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.A., Minnesota ; M.A., Nebraska ; Ph.D., Chicago. 

George M. Thompson (1923), Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Beaver; (Pittsburgh Musical Institute, Chicago College of Music, 
pupil of Clarence Eddy of Chicago and Joseph Bonnet of Paris). 

Helen Thrush (1939), Associate Professor of Art. 

B.F.A., Pennsylvania ; M.A., Columbia. 

Nettie Sue Tillett (1924), Professor of English. 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Columbia. 

George Brown Tinpall (1952), Assistant Professor in History. 

B.A., Furman ; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina. 

Mary Elizabeth Van Dyke (1949), Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.S., Wellesley. 

Herbert E. Vaughan, Jr. (1948), Professor of Education. 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., George Peabody. 

Lila Peck Walker (1948), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., North Carolina. 

Emily Holmes Watkins (1926), Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College ; M.A., Columbia. 

Marion M. Watson (1942), Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Elliott Weisgarber (1944), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., M.Mus., Eastman School of Music ; (pupil of Gustave Langenus, Howard 
Hansen, and Bernard Rogers). 

31 Rowena Wellman 1943) ^Associate Professor of Business Education. 

B.A., Iowa; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia. 

Louise Weyl (1950), Instructor in Commercial Department. 

B.A., South Dakota ; M.S., Tennessee. 

Mabel Louise White (1952), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Nancy White (1951), Instructor in Education. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Nathaniel S. White, Jr. (1951), Instructor in English. 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina. 



30 Resigned August 31, 1952. 
31 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



Faculty 23 

V. Louise Whitlock (1944), Assistant Professor of Business Education. 

B.S., Oregon State; M.S., Tennessee. 

32 M. Theresa Wiedefeld (1951), Lecturer in Education. 

B.S., Ed.D., Johns Hopkins. 

Mary Katharina Williams (1945), Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.S., M.A., Wisconsin. 

Maude Williams (1927), Associate Professor of Physiology. 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Illinois. 

33 Maude Williamson (1952), Visiting Professor of Home Economics. 

A.B., Illinois ; M.A., Columbia ; Ed.D., Stanford. 

George P. Wilson (1927), Professor of English. 

B.A., North Carolina ; M.A., Columbia. 

Bonnie-Jean Kimball Wold (1951), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., M.M., Northwestern University. 

ELEANOR V. Wolfe (1945), Instructor in Phyical Education. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., Texas State 
College for Women. 

Walter Edward Wollman (1952), Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., Eastman School of Music ; M.M., Manhattan School of Music. 

Alice B. Zimmerman (1948), Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., Indiana State Normal, Eastern Division, Muncie ; M.A., Columbia. 



ACADEMIC ASSISTANTS 

Laura-Mae AtKisson, Assistant in Music. 

A.B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

Anita Ilese Bolinger, Assistant in Biology. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Judith Livingston Burgess, Assistant in Psychology. 

B.A., Chicago. 

Eloise Clarke, Assistant in Biology. 

B.A., Mary Washington College. 

Lucy Horne Leath, Assistant in Nursery School. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Shirley Mahan, Assistant in Geography, Counselor. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., Syracuse. 

Elizabeth Graybeal McRimmon, Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Mildred Orrell, Assistant in Business Education. 

B.S.S.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.Ed., North 
Carolina. 

Georgia Miller Ryan, Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 



3a Resigned August 31, 1952. 
83 Second semester, 1952-1953. 



24 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Lois Taylor, Assistant in Chemistry. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Marjorie Juanita Toole, Assistant in Psychology, Counselor. 

B.A., Florida State College for Women ; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Seminary. 

Esther A. Wooten, Assistant in Biology. 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Jackson Burgess, English. 

B.A., Chicago. 

Margaret Click, Art. 

B.F.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Faye Coleman, Home Economics. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Louise Erickson, Music. 

B.M., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Nancy Catherine Greenlee, Home Economics. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Jill Johnston, Physical Education. 

B.S., Tufts College. 

Edythe Townsend McComb, Home Economics. 

B.S., Flora McDonald College. 

Marilyn Mason, Physical Education. 

B.S., Indiana. 

James Edward Orange, Business Education. 

B.S., Longwood College. 

Ada Alice Parramore, Home Economics. 

B.S., Georgia. 

Barbara Alice Saltzsieder, Physical Education. 

B.A., Hunter College. 

Yvonne Rose Stohlman, Physical Education. 

B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College. 

Magdalene R. Teufel, Home Economics. 

B.S., Madison College. 

Virginia Van Dyke, Physical Education. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Charlotte Womble, Home Economics. 

B.A., East Carolina College. 

THE LIBRARY 

Charles Marshall Adams (1945), Librarian, Professor. 

B.A., Amherst; B.S., M.A., Columbia. 

Margaret Mason Clements (1946), Reserve Librarian. 

B.A., Blue Mountain ; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody. 



Faculty 25 

Anne R. Correll, Assistant Circulation-Reference Librarian. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. B.S. in L.S., North 
Carolina. 

Dorothy Claire Grigg (1951), Junior Assistant Catalogue Librarian. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; B.S. in L.S., North 
Carolina. 

34 Elizabeth Jerome Hflder (1947), Assistant Circulation Librarian. 

B.A., Salem. 

Marjorie Hood (1929), Head Circulation Librarian. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; B.A. in L.S., Emory. 

Minnie Middleton Hussey (1930), Readers' Adviser Librarian. 

B.A., Meredith ; B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

Vivian Moose (1947), Assistant Catalogue Librarian. 

B.A., Lenoir Rhyne ; B.S. in L.S., North Carolina. 

Elizabeth Newland (1952), Assistant Circulation Librarian. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; B.S. in L.S., North 
Carolina. 

Elizabeth Sampson (1920), Head Catalogue Librarian. 

B.S., Simmons. 

Mary Robert Seawell (1945), Head Order Librarian. 

B.A., Meredith ; B.A. in L.S., North Carolina. 

Virginia Trumper (1922), Head Serials Librarian. 

(Dension ; Louisville Public Library Training Class.) 

Sue Vernon Williams (1926), Head Reference Librarian. 

B.A., M.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College ; Certificate, Carnegie Library 
School, Atlanta. 

Marjorie Whittington Memory (1949), Library Assistant, Circulation 
Department. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Betty Schopp (1952), Library Assistant, Catalogue Department. 
Ailene D. Tennyson (1952), Library Assistant, Order Department. 
Bethiah Weisgarber (1947), Library Assistant, Serials Department. 

B.M., Eastman School of Music. 



COUNSELORS IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Gozeal Hunt Andrews (1943), Ragsdale. 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College. 

Julia B. Barrett (1952), Bailey. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Frances Ann Butler (1950), Gray. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Anne Fulton Carter (1936), Cotten. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 



*On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



26 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Lillian Cunningham (1943), Jamison. 

B.A., Converse. 

Dorothy Grigsby (1952), Mendenhall. 

A.A., St. Genevieve-of-the-Pines ; South Carolina. 

Ione Holt Grogan (1935), Coit. 

B.A., North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College ; B.A., North Carolina 
College for Women ; M.A., Columbia. 

Marjorie Leonard (1941), Winfield. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., North Carolina. 

Shirley Mahan (1952), Kirkland. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., Syracuse. 

Helen Wallace Mims (1952), New Guilford. 

B.S., Winthrop College. 

Barbara Ellen Parrish (1952), Hinshaw. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. M.A., Columbia. 

Virginia M. Pierce (1952), Weil. 

B.A., Wellesley ; M.A., Columbia. 

Elizabegh McNeill Poteat (1951), Mary Foust. 

B.A., Oberlin College; M.A., North Carolina. 

Susan Robinson (1952) South Spencer. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Josephine Parker Schaeffer, (1950), Woman's Hall. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Marjorie Juanita Toole (1950), Shaw. 

B.A., Florida State College for Women ; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Seminary. 

Sue Harris Underhill (1949), North Spencer. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina ; M.A., George 
Peabody. 



OTHER OFFICERS 

May Lattimore Adams (1935), Assistant to the Dean of Students. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Janice Atwood (1952), Assistant Director, Elliott Hall. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Susan E. Barksdale (1943), Junior Class Chairman, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Art. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Columbia. 

Helen Burns (1937), Freshman Class Chairman, Associate Professor 

B.A., Iowa ; M.A., Columbia. 

Ethel V. Butler (1945), Manager of the Book Store. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

Ruth Abbott Clarke (1949), Co-ordinator of Religious Activities. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 



Faculty 27 

Dorothy Davis (1930), Senior Class Chairman, Associate Professor of 
Physical Education. 

B.A., Western College ; M.A., Wisconsin. 

Robert Lenley Garrard (1948), Psychiatrist. 

B.A., M.S., B.S. in Medicine, Alabama ; M.D., Harvard. 

Nestus H. Gurley (1949), Assistant to the Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds. 

B.S. in M.E., North Carolina State. 

Kathleen P. Hawkins (1921), Student Aid Officer. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Betty Brown Jester (1931), Alumnae Secretary. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

Mary Edith Newton (1947), Manager of the Soda Shop. 

Barbara Ellen Parrish (1952), Assistant Placement Officer, Counselor. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. M.A., Columbia. 

35 Helen Lee Pickard (1923), Assistant Purchasing Agent. 
Elvira L. Prondecki (1946), Director, Elliott Hall. 

B.A., Smith. 

Josephine Parker Schaeffer (1950), Placement Officer, Counselor. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Ruthe Shafer (1942), Cashier. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

J. Moyer Sink (1911), Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 
Mabel N. Swanson (1938), Director of Dining Halls, Professor. 

B.S., Washington ; M.S. Columbia. 

Mary Alice Tennent (1913), Assistant Registrar. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

Virginia Dare Thomas (1949), Head Nurse, Infirmary. 

R.N., St. Leo's Hospital School of Nursing. 

Lila Peck Walker (1948), Sophomore Class Chairman, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., North Carolina. 

Albert A. Wilkinson (1947), Director of the News Bureau. 

B.A., Duke. 

Frances Lee Wolfe (1951), Administrative Assistant, Office of the 
Chancellor. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., Kansas. 

SECRETARIES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS 

Elizabeth Booker (1944), Office of the Class Chairmen. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Mazie Bain Bullard (1949), Office of Admissions. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 
85 Deceased February 16, 1953. 



28 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Terrell W. Cofield (1952), Office of Admissions. 

B.M., Rollins College. 

Louise Scott Crews (1948), Supervisor of the Switchboard. 
Evon Welch Dean (1942), Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Doris DeVeny (1948), Accompanist, Department of Physical Education. 

B.Mus., Oberlin Conversatory. 

Sara Clark Dobbins (1949), Office of the Department of Public Rela- 
tions. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Josephine M. Flynn (1952), Office of the Assistant Controller. 

B.A., M.S., North Carolina. 

Margaret H. Gerringer (1951), Office of the Chancellor. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Alice Irene Glass (1948), Office of the Dean of Instruction. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Helen Dobbins Green (1949), Office of the College Physician. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Edna Earle Gresham (1947), Office of the School of Education. 

C.C, Elon College. 

Charlotte Gulliver (1948), Manager of the Post Office, 

A. A., Centenary, N. J. 

Mary Randolph Gyles (1946), Office of the Department of Physical 
Education. 

Louise Atkins Hammond (1946), Office of the Graduate School. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Vivian K. Hardy (1952), Pay Roll Clerk, Accounting Department. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Edith Harwood (1923), Statistician, Office of the Registrar. 

B.L., Berea. 

36Betty Marsh Heist (1951), Office of Dean of the School of Music. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Ruth M. Howerton (1952), Manager of the Mimeographing Service. 

B.A., Judson College. 

Katherine Chauncey Huffine (1953), Office of the Dean of the School 
of Music. 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

37Tempe Hughes (1951), Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Ruth B. Jessup (1951), Assistant Auditor. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 



36 Resigned January 15, 1953. 
"Resigned December 15, 1952. 



Faculty 29 

Nicholas F. Johnson (1936), Office of the Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds. 

Diploma, Greensboro Business College. 

Louise Davis Johnson (1948), Office of the News Bureau. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Mildred Hood Johnson (1952), Office of the Registrar. 

Caroline T. Jones (1951), Administrative Assistant, Residence Halls. 

B.S., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Betty Perry Kirk (1951), Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Marie Lane (1949), Office of Distributive Education Service. 

Ella Mae Livingston (1945), Assistant to the Manager of the Soda 
Shop. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Pearl Fuller McCollum (1950), Cashier, Book Store. 

Kathleen Skipper Meyland (1952), Office of the Assistant Controller. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Sallie Tucker Mumford (1947), Laboratory Technician, Infirmary. 

B.A., North Carolina College for Women. 

Mary Jane Nisbet (1952), Office of the Department of English. 

B.S.S.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Phyllis B. Pettit (1952), Office of the Chancellor. 

B.A., North Carolina. 

Virginia Mae Powell (1945), Assistant Director, Dining Halls. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Nancy Bush Preas (1952), Administrative Assistant, Dining Halls. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Theda Pritchett (1939), Office of the Dietitian. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Eloise Taylor Robinson (1944), Bookkeeper, Book Store. 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Elizabeth B. Rockey (1950), Office of the School of Home Economics. 
Zella Marie Roden (1952), Assistant Dietitian. 

B.S., Michigan State. 

Dorothy Elizabeth Siegmund (1949), Office of Registrar. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Sara H. Smith (1952), Assistant Cashier, Accounting Department. 

B.A., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Laura Lucas Starnes (1951), Assistant Director, Residence Halls. 

B.S., M.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Mary Graves Turbville (1942), Assistant Nurse, Infirmary. 



30 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Mary Jane Venable (1949), Placement Office. 

C.C., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Ray Venable (1951), Nurse, Infirmary. 

R.N., North Carolina Sanatorium. 

R. Jeanette Wade (1948), Assistant Manager of the Book Store. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 

Louise G. Warden (1951), Office of the School of Home Economics. 
Julia White (1950), Nurse, Infirmary. 

R.N., St. Leo's Hospital School of Nursing. 

Louise H. White (1952), Office of the Registrar. 

Certificate, New Platz Teachers College. 

Bennie Brown Yerton (1950), Assistant Auditor, Accounting Depart- 
ment. 

C.C, Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Faculty Council. The Faculty Council, meetings of which are 
presided over by the Chancellor, is the legislative body of the College. 
It is composed of the Chief Administrative Officers, Professors, Asso- 
ciate Professors, Assistant Professors, and Instructors of three years' 
standing. The time for regular meeting is the evening of the third 
Tuesday of each month. 

Academic and Personnel. Miss Mossman (Chairman), Miss Tay- 
lor, Miss Davis, Chairman of Class of 1953; Miss Barksdale, Chairman 
of Class of 1954; Miss Walker, Chairman of Class of 1955; Miss Burns, 
Chairman of Freshman Class; Dr. Collings. 

Advisers. Members of the Faculty, under the guidance of the Class 
Chairmen, serve as advisers for all freshmen and sophomores. 

Advisory. Miss Arundel, Mr. Ashby 1 , Mr. Bridgers, Mr. Keister, 
Miss Ingraham, Mr. Ivy, Miss Largent, Miss Lewis, Mr. Prall, Miss 
Roberts 2 . 

Arts Forum. Miss Taylor (Chairman), Mrs. Carter, Miss England, 
Miss Grogan, Miss Hardin, M. Hardre, Mr. Macauley, Miss Moomaw, 
Mr. Opper, Miss Reardon, Mr. Weisgarber. 

Building. Mr. Hall, Mr. Lockhart, Miss Playfoot, Miss Taylor. 

Campus Stores Committee. Miss Prondecki (Chairman), Mr. Fer- 
gerson, Mr. Hagood. 

Catalogue. Mr. Wilson. 

Class Chairmen. Freshman, Miss Burns; Sophomore, Miss Walker; 
Junior, Miss Barksdale; Senior, Miss Davis. 



1 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 

'Serving remainder of Mr. Ashby's term for 1952-1953. 



Standing Committees of the Faculty 31 

Commencement. Mr. Shaftesbury (Chairman), Miss Davis, Miss 
Lewis, Mr. C. W. Phillips (Secretary), Mrs. Jester, Miss Newton, Miss 
Mossman, Mr. Sink, Miss Swanson, Miss Taylor, Miss Tennent. 

Concerts. Miss Minor, Miss Watkins, Mr. Weisgarber. 

Curriculum. Mr. Prall (Chairman), Mr. Ivy, Miss Coldwell, Mr. 
Littlejohn, Miss Schaeffer, Mr. Laine, Mr. Keister, Miss Arundel, Mr. 
Barrett, Miss Largent, Miss Agnes Coxe, Miss Watkins, Mr. Ashby, Miss 
Martus, Miss Reardon, Mr. Hooke, Mr. Morgan, Mr. Hurley, Miss Moss- 
man, Miss Duffy, Mr. Fergerson, Miss Schriver. 

Elections. Mr. Shaftesbury (Chairman), Miss Alexander, Miss 
Barton. 

Finance Board. Mrs. Adams, Mr. Barrett, Mr. Keister, Mr. Lockhart. 

General Education Evaluation. Miss Shivers (Chairman), Miss 
Burns, Mr. Friedlaender, Mr. Highsmith, Miss Mossman, Miss New- 
ton, Miss Reardon, Miss Taylor, Miss Watkins, Miss Frances Wolfe. 

General Education, the Humanities: M. Hardre (Chairman), 
Miss Barksdale, Miss Bush, Miss Cowling, Miss Farinholt, Miss Hege, 
Mr. Hurley, Mr. Macauley, Miss Miller, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Mueller, 
Mr. Tindall, Mr. Isenberg, Mr. Opper. 

General Education, Natural Sciences: Miss Dawley (Chairman), 
Miss Elizabeth Adams, Miss Barton, Miss Duffy, Miss Harpster, Miss 
Lewis, Miss Reardon, Miss Schaeffer, Mr. Shaftesbury, Mr. Cutter. 

General Education, Social Sciences: Mr. Parker (Chairman), 
Miss Arundel, Mr. Glenn Johnson, Mrs. Miriam Johnson, Mr. Keister, 
Miss Largent, Mr. Edinger, Mr. McCutchan, Miss Sara Smith. 

General Education Steering Committee. Mr. Friedlaender (Chair- 
man), Miss Barton, Miss Farinholt, Miss Ingraham, Miss Martus, Miss 
Mossman, Miss Schaeffer, Miss Dawley, M. Hardre, Mr. Parker, Miss 
Roberts, Miss Shivers. 

Graduate Creative Arts. Mr. Friedlaender (Chairman), Mr. Hur- 
ley, Mr. Ivy, Miss Martus, Mr. McNutt, ex officio. 

Graduate Study. Mr. McNutt (Chairman), Mr. Friedlaender, Miss 
Hunter, Mr. Littlejohn, Miss Mossman, Mr. Prall, Miss Barton, Mr. 
Cutter, Miss Martus, Miss Roberts. 

Harriet Elliott Social Science Forum. Miss Arundel (Chairman), 
Miss Duffy, Miss Draper, Miss Grogan, Miss Hege, Mr. Glenn Johnson, 
Mr. Keister, Miss Mossman, Mr. Procter, Miss Shivers. 

Honorary Degrees. Miss Barton (Chairman), Mr. McNutt, Mr. 
Morgan, Miss Mossman, Miss Taylor, Mr. Hooke. 

Honors. Mr. Bridgers (Chairman), Mr. Felt, Miss Maude Williams. 

Honors Work. Miss Barton ( Chairman), Miss Duffy, Miss Miller, 
Mr. Hurley, Miss Cowling, Miss Draper, Mr. Shaftesbury. 

Lectures. Mr. Hall (Chairman), Mr. Adams, Miss Harpster, Miss 
Martus, Miss Sara Smith, Miss Katherine Taylor. 



32 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Library. Miss Thrush (Chairman), Mr. Adams (Secretary, ex 
officio), Miss Mossman, Miss Duffy, Miss Hunter, Mr. Friedlaender, 
Miss Dawley, Miss Keeney. 

Mrs. Charles D. McIver Memorial Scholarship. Dr. Collings 
(Chairman), Miss Ingraham, Miss Mossman. 

Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Barrow (Chairman), Miss Petty, 
Miss Reardon, Miss Watkins. 

Mina Weil Memorial Scholarship. Mr. Keister (Chairman), Miss 
Alexander, Miss Shivers. 

Motion Pictures. Miss Reardon (Chairman), Miss Barrow, Mr. 
J. A. Smith. 

Points. Mrs. Funderburk, Mr. Tindall. 

Pre-Professional Education for Medicine. Miss Harpster (Chair- 
man), Miss Burns, Miss Sehaeffer, Mr. Bridgers, Miss Sara Smith, 
Mr. Parker, Miss Mossman, Dr. Collings, Mr. Cutter. 

Radio. Mrs. Rosa (Chairman), Miss Cowling, Miss Dorothy Davis, 
Miss Harpster, Miss Hege, Mrs. Jester, Mr. Vaughan, Mr. White. 

Religious Activities. Miss Draper (Chairman), Mrs. Clarke, ex 
officio (Secretary), Miss Griffin, Miss Shivers. 

Reviewing. Mr. Painter (Chairman), Miss Barksdale, Miss Griffin, 
Miss Lewis, Miss Prondecki, Mr. Vaughan. 

Rooms and Offices. Mr. Vaughan (Chairman), Miss Bush, Miss 
Griffin, Miss Sampson. 

Scheduling Public Events. Mr. C. W. Phillips (chairman), Miss 
Barton, Miss Griffin, Mr. Lockhart, Miss Taylor, Mr. Adams, Miss 
Playfoot. 

Scholarships and Student Aid. Miss Taylor (Chairman), Miss 
Burns, Mrs. Hawkins, Mr. Lockhart, Miss Mossman, Miss Newton, 
Mrs. Sehaeffer, Miss Thrush, Miss Tillett, Miss Leonard. 

Social. Miss Playfoot (Chairman), Mrs. Andrews, Mr. Hagood, 
Mrs. Sehaeffer, Miss Jane Cox, Miss Roden, Mrs. Starnes, Miss Moomaw, 
Mrs. Claire Atkisson, Mr. Painter. 

Student Legislature Representatives. Miss Cunningham, Miss 
Leonard, Miss Ryan. 

Television Advisory Council. Mr. McNutt (Chairman), Miss Moss- 
man, Mr. C. W. Phillips, Miss Taylor. 

Weil Fellowship. Miss Taylor (Chairman), Miss Davis, Miss 
Mossman. 

Winfield Endowment. Miss Summerell (Chairman), Miss Davis, 
Chairman of Class of 1953; Miss LaRochelle. 



II. THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, the first 
state-supported institution for the higher education of women in North 
Carolina, was established by legislative enactment on February 18, 
1891, and opened on October 5, 1892. The City of Greensboro, situated 
near the geographical center of the state, was selected for the location 
of the new institution. Its citizens voted bonds to the sum of $30,000 
for the erection of the first buildings, and the original ten-acre site 
was given by R. S. Pullen and R. T. Gray, of Raleigh. 

The College, for many years (1896-1919) the State Normal and 
Industrial College, and later (1919-1932) the North Carolina College 
for Women, came into being as a direct result of a crusade made by 
Charles Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of women. Other 
pioneers in public-school education — notably, Charles B. Aycock, Ed- 
win A. Alderman, and James Y. Joyner — came to Dr. Mclver's assist- 
ance; but to him more than to any other individual the College owes 
its foundation. He became its first president and served it until his 
death in 1906. In that year Dr. Julius I. Foust became president, and 
upon the foundation laid by Dr. Mclver he and his co-workers developed 
a strong liberal-arts college. 

The College became a part of the University of North Carolina in 
1931, when the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act to 
consolidate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh, and the North Caro- 
lina College for Women. By the provisions of this act the North Caro- 
lina College for Women, on July 1, 1932, became the Woman's College 
of the University of North Carolina. At that time, also, the Board 
of Trustees chosen by the General Assembly assumed control of the 
new university, and a few months later elected Dr. Frank Porter 
Graham its president. In 1934 Dr. Foust retired from active service 
and was made President Emeritus of the Woman's College. At the 
same time Dr. Walter Clinton Jackson, who had served the College as 
teacher and vice-president, was elected head of the institution with the 
title of Dean of Administration. By act of the Board of Trustees in 
1945, the title of the head of the institution was changed to Chancellor. 
Dr. Jackson retired on June 30, 1950, and on July 1, Dr. Edward Kidder 
Graham became Chancellor of the College. 

Although originally the main purpose of the Woman's College was 
to provide instruction for those expecting to enter the public-school 
system of the state, it has developed into a distinguished liberal-arts 
college. The College now offers liberal courses in the arts and sciences 
and in music, and at the same time it continues to give teacher train- 
ing and instruction in commercial branches, in home economics, and in 

33 



34 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

other subjects the mastery of which will enable women to become self- 
supporting. From a student body of 223 and a faculty of 15 the Col- 
lege has grown into one of the largest colleges for women in the coun- 
try, with a plant valued at approximately $22,000,000, a faculty of more 
than 280, and a student body of 2,500. 

The Woman's College is a member of the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Association of American Colleges, 
the American Council on Education, the Southern Association of Col- 
leges for Women, the North Carolina College Conference, the National 
Commission on Accrediting. Its graduates are eligible to membership 
in the American Association of University Women. 

The College confers seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Business Edu- 
cation and Secretarial Administration, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, 
and Bachelor of Fine Arts. Certain curricula of the Graduate School 
of the University are also offered at the Woman's College. These cur- 
ricula are in the fields of Business Education and Secretarial Adminis- 
tration, Elementary Education, Home Economics, and Fine Arts. The 
College is organized into the College of Liberal Arts, the School of 
Music, the School of Education, and the School of Home Economics. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina is a part 
of the public-school system of the state. As a state institution it desires 
to be of the greatest possible service to the people of North Carolina, 
and its advantages are open to all on similar terms. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Since its establishment the College has constantly added to its mate- 
rial equipment. The campus now consists of more than one hundred and 
thirty acres of improved and wooded land on which there are fifty build- 
ings. Apart from the residence halls, the following are the principal 
buildings: the Administration Building (1892) — offices of administration, 
classrooms, faculty offices; the dining rooms (1904, 1922, 1925, 1939) — 
four large halls (capacity 2,000) connected through a central serving 
room with kitchen and cold storage plant; the old Library (1905, rebuilt 
in 1933 after as disastrous fire) ; Mclver Building (1908) — class and 
lecture rooms, laboratories, and offices; the Anna M. Gove Infirmary 
(1912) — fifty beds for students, offices for consultation; examinations, 
and dispensary treatment, and a residence for nurses; the Home Man- 
agement Houses (1921, 1941, 1951) — of the School of Home Economics, 
furnished and equipped on moderate and low-income levels respectively, 
laboratories for conducting the activities of a home; the Outdoor Gym- 
nasium (1922) ; the Chancellor's Home (1923) — the residence of the 
family of the Chancellor; the Rosenthal Gymnasium (1923) — a main 
gymnasium and two small gymnasiums, various rooms for lecture and 
remedial purposes, offices, game room, swimming pool, dressing and 



Laboratories and Studios 35 

shower rooms; the Coleman Gymnasium (1952) — a modern gymnasium, 
dance studios, corrective and remedial laboratories, bowling alleys, golf 
room, lecture and study rooms, offices, examination rooms, complete 
locker and shower facilities, visual aids laboratory; the Music Building 
(1924) — a recital hall, classrooms, offices, and practice rooms; Aycock 
Auditorium (1926) — the large auditorium (capacity 3,000) reception 
rooms, cloak rooms, offices, an assembly room for the meeting of the 
Play-Likers, a large laboratory; Curry Building (1926) — the training 
school, with school and college classrooms, a large demonstration room, 
an auditorium (capacity 500), and offices; Curry Homemaking Cottage 
(1948) ; the old Home Economics Building (1927) — class and lecture 
room, laboratories, nursery school, offices; Alumnae House (1935) — for 
official alumnae and college functions, offices for the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, for student publications, for the Student Government Association; 
the Science Building (1939) — class lecture rooms and laboratories; the 
new Library (1950); the new Home Economics Building (1951), class- 
rooms, laboratories, conferences and reception rooms, a dining room, 
cafeteria, an auditorium and stage, and offices; the Coleman Gymnasium 
(1951) ; and Elliott Hall (1952)— the student union. 

LABORATORIES AND STUDIOS 

Art Studios — The Weatherspoon Art Gallery, in Mclver Building, 
provides suitable space for exhibitions of paintings, prints, sculpture, 
and other art forms. The North Carolina School Art Exhibition, the 
Student Exhibition, and the International Textile Exhibition are held 
here annually. The small adjacent gallery is used for the Senior Stu- 
dent Exhibitions and small loan exhibitions. From the various student 
exhibitions examples of work are selected each year to be added to 
the permanent collection of the Department of Art. The Art Refer- 
ence Room, adjacent to the Witherspoon Art Gallery, houses the collec- 
tion of reproductions of paintings, sculpture, architecture, etc.; the 
WPA collection of prints and watercolors, the collection of contempo- 
rary textiles, and the art periodicals. This room is also used for small 
exhibitions. The collection presented by the Weatherspoon Gallery Asso- 
ciation, consisting of works by living Americans, was begun in 1942, 
and will be increasingly important as the collection grows. 

Bioligy Laboratories — The Department of Biology occupies the 
second floor and part of the first floor of the Science Building. There 
are five suites of laboratories used by students in general biology, physi- 
ology and anatomy, zoology, botany, and bacteriology. In each suite 
there are a preparation room and a storeroom, with classrooms and 
offices nearby. Upon completion of the wings being added to the Science 
Building, six new laboratories will be available. Changes in the rooms 
previously used as laboratories will give needed classrooms and offices. 
Excellent equipment for biological work is provided. A constant-tem- 
perature animal room and an incubator room are used in advanced work, 
and good compound microscopes, models, charts, projection lanterns, 



36 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

slides, and museum collections are available for all courses. The Col- 
lege owns and operates a small marine laboratory at Beaufort, North 
Carolina, where summer courses in marine zoology are given and where 
research may be carried on. 

Chemistry Laboratories — The Department of Chemistry, housed in 
the Science Building, has well-equipped laboratories and preparation 
rooms for the various branches of chemistry, including general, ana- 
lytical, organic, physical, food, and biochemistry. Ajoining the analytical 
and phyical chemistry laboratory is a specially constructed balance 
room, and adjoining the food and biochemistry laboratories are a 
smaller balance room and a dark room. There is a large storeroom, and 
the classrooms are equipped for lecture demonstrations. The facilities 
for general chemistry, quantitative analysis and physical chemistry have 
recently been enlarged by the opening of two new wings of the Science 
Building. 

Home Economics Laboratories — The School of Home Economics is 
housed in a beautiful, modern building specially designed and equipped 
to facilitate the educational and research program of the School. Since 
laboratory experience is an integral part of much of the teaching in 
home economics, laboratories are maintained for work in nutrition, 
dietetics, and foods; in clothing, historic textiles and costumes; in 
textile research, including chemical and physical analysis, laundering 
and dry cleaning; in household equipment and household economics; in 
home furnishings; and in institution management. Special laboratories 
are housed in the building are the nursery school, the three home man- 
agement houses, and the Curry Cottage. 

Physics Laboratories — The Department of Physics is located in the 
Science Building on the first floor and in the south basement, has five 
well-equipped laboratories for work in general physics, mechanics and 
sound, heat, optics, electricity and mangnetism; two classrooms equipped 
for demonstration lectures; a suite of rooms for X-ray work; reading 
room; mechanics shop; storerooms and a photography suite which in- 
cludes four darkrooms, two studios, enlarging room, and a general work- 
shop. The department has a great variety of experimental equipment, 
including a windvane, anemometer, and a rain gage mounted on the 
roof of the Science Building, and a Foucault pendulum hanging in a 
shaft which extends the full height of the building with openings on 
each floor and the roof. 

Psychology Laboratories — The Department of Psychology has a 
laboratory for general psychology, equipped with modern apparatus. A 
mental-testing laboratory includes an observation room with one-way 
vision equipment for demonstrations, and four small rooms for indi- 
vidual testing. Mental-testing equipment includes most of the recog- 
nized tests available. The child psychology laboratory, equipped with 
booths for individual interviews, audiometer, and other apparatus is 
located in the practice school in Curry Building. The department also 
has fully equipped reading, animal, and research laboratories. 



Residence Halls 37 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

There are seventeen residence halls on the campus. In each hall is 
a counselor, to whom students may go for advice and who supervises 
social activities in accordance with regulations of the College. The 
rooms are comfortably furnished. Only single beds are used. North 
Spencer Hall and South Spencer Hall (1904, remodeled and modernized 
in 1938) — named for Mrs. Cornelia Phillips Spencer, one of North Caro- 
lina's most distinguished women, three hundred and sixteen students; 
Woman's Hall (1912) — dedicated by the General Assembly of North 
Carolina to the women of the Confederacy, fifty-six students; Kirkland 
Hall (1912) — named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first lady principal 
of the College, eighty-four students; Anna Howard Shaw (1920) — 
named for the great national woman suffragist, one hundred and four 
students; Gray Hall (1921) — named for Mr. Robert T. Gray, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the College from 1900 to 1912, one 
hundred and twenty-two students; Bailey Hall (1922) — named for Mr. 
T. B. Bailey, a member of the Board of Trustees of the College from 
1902 to 1916, one hundred and twenty-two students; Cotten Hall (1922) 
— named for Mrs. Sally Southall Cotten, one hundred and twenty-two 
students; Hinshaw Hall (1922) — named for Colonel G. W. Hinshaw, a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the College from 1910 to 1918, 
one hundred and twenty-two students; Laura Coit hall (1923) — named 
for Miss Laura Coit, late secretary of the College, one hundred and 
twenty-two students; Jamison Hall (1923) — named for Miss Minnie 
Jamison, one of the first students and long-time member of the faculty, 
one hundred and twenty-two students; Laura Coit Hall (1923) — named 
by the alumnae of the College in memory of the daughter of the late 
President Foust, one hundred and forty-six students; New Guilford 
Hall (1927)— a duplicate of Mary Foust Hall; Winfield-Weil Hall 
(1939) — named for Miss Martha Winfield, late professor of English at 
the College, and for Mrs. Mina Weil, benefactress of the College, two 
distinct but connected halls giving the appearance of one building, two 
hundred and ninety students; Mendenhall-Ragsdale Hall (1950) — named 
for Miss Gertrude Mendenhall, charter member of the faculty and late 
head of the Department of Mathematics, and Miss Virginia Ragsdale, 
who succeeded Miss Mendenhall as head of the Department of Mathe- 
matics, similar in construction to Weil-Winfield, three hundred and 
eight students. 

Gray, Cotten, Coit, Jamison, Bailey, Hinshaw, and Kirkland are 
freshman halls. 

THE LIBRARY 

The aim of the Library is to make available to the student a care- 
fully selected collection of books and other library materials in every 
field of study in which courses are offered and to provide a wide selec- 
tion of current books and periodicals of general interest. Further, it 



38 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

provides a service on these books and other materials which aids the 
student in her assigned work and directs her reading interests. The 
assistance given to students individually by members of the staff or in 
class groups is intended to be entirely suggestive as to procedure in 
searching for material, not a direct help in finding it. Special lectures 
are provided for classes with particular problems, and The Library — A 
Guide is issued for the freshmen and others using the Library for the 
first time. For the upperclassmen, graduate students, and faculty, spe- 
cial areas are provided for individual use. Through seminars and lec- 
ture rooms, the Library aims to bring students, faculty, and visiting 
lecturers in close relation to the use of its resources. Special collections 
are maintained in a few fields, such as The Woman's Collection, devoted 
to books by and about women, and in the College Collection, devoted to 
the history of the College. 

The new library building, completed in the spring of 1950, has a 
capacity for over 200,000 volumes and total seating facilities for 1,000 
students at one time. It now has 148,389 catalogued volumes and a 
selected collection of federal and state documents, pamphlets, and maps. 
It provides on open shelves a generous selection of reference books and 
bibliographies, current numbers of periodicals and bound volumes since 
1940, and reserve books for class assignments. In the General Reading 
Room there is a general selection of classics and current literature in 
all fields to encourage exploration beyond required reading. This area 
is attractively furnished to encourage leisurely reading and study. In 
the stacks faculty studies, carrells, desks, and tables are provided for 
concentrated work. Areas for typing are available and lockers for those 
who wish to leave their notes in the library. 

Special facilities have been provided for the use of audio-visual 
materials. Two small sound-proof rooms, seating as many as five or six, 
are provided for playing music recordings, and special machines with 
earphones are available for the use of diction records in other areas. 
A sound-proof seminar, seating about 70, and a large lecture room, 
seating 372, are provided for group use of documentary films, music, or 
lectures. The Library maintains a framed picture collection for rental 
to students for use in their dormitory rooms. Microfilm readers and a 
microcard reader are provided for use of back files of newspapers and 
specialized reference books not otherwise available in print. 

It is a distinct advantage to the College, from a library point of 
view, that it is located in a rich literary and cultural area. In addition 
to its own book collection the Library is able in a short time, by means 
of inter-library loan service, to make available for faculty and graduate 
research the extensive book resources of the other units of the Consoli- 
dated University, Duke University, and other libraries in the vicinity. 



Library Hours 39 

LIBRARY HOURS* 

During Academic Year 

Week-days 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 

Sundays 2:30 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. 

During Intersession 

Monday-Friday 9 :00 a.m.- 4 :00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon 

Holidays — Library Closed 
New Year's Day 
Thanksgiving Day 
Christmas Eve 
Christmas Day 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The student health service has as its aim the maintenance of good 
health among all members of the college community. To reach this 
objective, the work is necessarily of two types: first, preventive, and 
second, curative. Five types of preventive measures are taken. First, 
a complete medical examination is given to each student in both her 
freshman and her senior years. This examination includes a careful 
physical examination, laboratory tests, and a tuberculin test of each 
entering and senior student with a chest X-ray of each positive reactor. 
The health service occasionally must recommend to the administration 
that a student physically unable to carry the full college load be asked 
to lighten her work or to withdraw from college until such time as her 
health shall improve. Second, follow-up examinations are given all stu- 
dents showing remediable defects, with a special effort to see that all 
such defects are corrected as soon as possible. Third, a careful check 
is made of all students engaged in self-help activities, extra academic 
work, athletic contests, or other strenuous extra-curricular duties. 
Fourth, vaccinations for smallpox are given each member of the col- 
lege community every five years, in accordance with the ordinance of 
the City of Greensboro, and typhoid vaccination of all food handlers 
yearly. Influenza vaccine is offered to all students free of charge. Fifth, 
the physical conditions under which students work and live are care- 
fully supervised; proper diet, heating, lighting, ventilation, and sani- 
tation are all included among these conditions. The care of sick stu- 
dents, which is the second major duty of the health service, is centered 
in the Anna M. Gove Infirmary. Here, with a staff of two full-time 
physicians, a part-time psychiatrist, four graduate nurses, and a lab- 
oratory technician in attendance, all medical and minor surgical cases 
are given complete care. Major surgical cases must be referred to a 
hospital and surgeon not directly connected with the College. 



3 The schedule may vary according to the demand and the college calendar. 



40 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

All resident students too ill to attend their college duties are ad- 
mitted to the Infirmary for care, and excuses are issued upon their 
recovery and readmission to classes. Town students ill at home must 
bring to the College physician a note either from their parents or the 
attending physician within seventy-two hours of their return to school. 
Excuses are then issued by the medical staff in accordance with the rules 
laid down by the faculty council. Students should report promptly to 
the Infirmary in cases of illness of any kind. Prompt attention to 
minor conditions prevents the development of major ill health. In order 
to care for all cases promptly, the students' health service holds office 
hours as follows: 

DOCTORS 

8:30 A.M. to 12 :30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 

2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

Other times by appointment. Emergency at any time. 

NURSES 

7 :45 a.m. to 12 :30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 

2 :00 p.m. to 4 :30 p.m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. daily. 

9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Sunday. 

THE COMMUNITY 

Government 

The faculty and the students have integrated their ideas in the con- 
stitution governing the College. The law-making authority resides in a 
representative body from the student group and the faculty. All stu- 
dent officers are chosen democratically. The student organization works 
in close co-operation with the Dean of Students and the counselors who 
have charge of the residence halls. 

There are three divisions of the student-government machinery: the 
Judicial Board, the Legislature, and the House Organization, serving 
in their various capacities. It is understood that to the faculty and 
the executive officers is reserved the handling of such matters as affect 
academic questions, matters relating to the health of the college com- 
munity, the control of property, and of special cases of discipline which 
are outside student jurisdiction. 

Religion 

Voluntary Organizations. Though the College is nonsectarian, the 
students are surrounded by religious influences. In addition to the 
Young Women's Christian Association, there are organized church 
groups with which students identify themselves for a continuing source 
of strength and place of service. Participation in this group work is 



The Community 41 

invaluable training for religious leadership. Four churches — Methodist, 
Episcopal, Baptist, and Presbyterian — maintain student secretaries who 
live near the College and work through student centers and churches 
adjacent to the campus. 

Students through these member organizations make up the Student 
Christian Movement on the campus and are a part of the United Stu- 
dent Christian Council and the World's Student Christian Federation. 
Bible study, church affiliation, the service on the World Day of Prayer 
for Students, overseas student relief, and ecumenical conferences are 
among the undertakings which they share. In the college community, 
new steps are continually being taken to establish fellowship and ways 
of work among members of the historic divisions of the Christian 
movement. 

Y.W.C.A. The Young Women's Christian Association, affiliated with 
the national organization and with the World's Student Christian Fed- 
eration, seeks to aid students with their intimate daily problems of liv- 
ing, and also to form a channel through which they may unite them- 
selves with the great body of students throughout the world who seek 
the best way of life for themselves and for all people of all races. Any 
student of the College may become a member of the Association by ac- 
cepting its purposes. In conjunction with the church groups, the Asso- 
ciation sponsors seminars, discussion groups, services of worship and 
religious education, chapel programs, recreational activities, intercol- 
legiate conferences, campus and community service work, and other 
group and individual activity of religious nature and significance. 

The Inter-Faith Council is composed of student representatives of 
the church groups and of the Y.W.C.A., the four church secretaries, 
and faculty representatives or Greensboro ministers who are members 
of groups that have no student worker. The Council promotes under- 
standing of the common purposes of Jewish, Protestant, and Roman 
Catholic believers and unites all in joint activities. Members are work- 
ing with the whole College on the fund for a chapel, a building in which 
students of all faiths will be at home. Students are encouraged both by 
the College and the churches to attend regularly the church of their 
choice. 

Director. The College employs a Co-ordinator of Religious Activi- 
ties, whose office serves as a clearing-house for the activities of all 
campus religious organizations, and who advises students about their 
personal problems. 

University Sermons, inaugurated in 1934, are given by eminent 
leaders of different faiths. Each of the four classes sponsors one of 
these services on a Sunday morning during the year. 

Social Life 

The social life of the College centers around the residence hall units, 
the four societies, and various clubs and class organizations. Picnics, 
week-end camping trips, teas, and formal and informal dances help 



42 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

create a normal social atmosphere. Through certain of the clubs and 
through the advisory system, members of the faculty are able to estab- 
lish social contacts with the students. Altogether there are many oppor- 
tunities within the college community for a wholesome social life. 

Elliott Hall, the new Student Union, is the center of extra-curricular 
activities. Its facilities include a large ballroom, a game room, lounges, 
meeting-rooms, offices for publications, study and locker rooms for day 
students, and the College post office and book store. 

The Soda Shop is the campus snack bar, where students gather be- 
tween classes and in the evening. 

SPORTS 

The Athletic fields include twelve tennis courts; soccer, speedball, 
hockey, and Softball fields; a practice golf course, an archery range, 
and other outdoor play areas. The Recreation Association Camp, six 
miles from the city, is open to members of the Association for week-end 
camping groups. 

The Rosenthal Gymnasium houses the swimming pool, dressing and 
shower rooms, one large gymnasium floor, and three smaller ones. The 
Coleman Gymnasium provides the following modern facilities for a broad 
program of physical education for women: gymnasium, activity, terrace, 
corrective unit, two dance studios, bowling alleys, indoor golf range, 
game rooms, and instructional and administrative rooms and offices. A 
lake on the grounds provides for boating and canoeing. An amphitheatre 
is situated on the shore of the lake and is used for outside activities — 
May Day and other programs. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

The College is wholly or partly responsible for bringing to its stu- 
dent body every year a number of distinguished artists and lecturers 
in the fields of art, the dance, and letters. The College also co-operates 
with the Civic Music Association in bringing to the campus throughout 
the year persons distinguished in the field of music. 

DRAMATICS 

The College offers exceptional advantages to students interested in 
dramatic activities. Numerous class plays, experimental plays, depart- 
mental plays, one-act plays, as well as full-length plays presented by 
the Play-Likers, give a considerable number of students opportunities 
not only to act, but also to do creative work in the arts of the theatre. 
The facilities for carrying on such work in the College are exceptional. 
A large room in the basement of Aycock Auditorium is used by students 
in play production for designing, constructing, and painting scenery. 
Modern stage electrical equipment of every type is used in the lighting 
experiments. 



Radio and Television 43 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

In 1947-1948 the College included radio work in its curriculum. It 
now offers to its students courses in radio and television communication. 
The courses conform to the basic characteristics of a general education 
and at the same time introduce the student to the basic knowledge and 
skills employed in vocational radio and television as communication 
media from the viewpoints of historical background and evolution, eco- 
nomic growth and prominence, social impact and importance, govern- 
ment responsibility and control, and vocational employment. The courses 
train students in script writing and program planning and familiarize 
them with the technical aspects of production and direction. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

Societies. The Adelphian, Cornelian, Dikean, and Aletheian societies 
occupy an important place in student life. The societies as organiza- 
tions managed entirely by students give opportunity for a friendly 
social life. Membership is optional, but few representative students fail 
to identify themselves with one of the societies. Each society keeps open 
house several times during the year. Informal teas, dances, and parties 
are part of the regular programs, and each society has a formal dance 
during the spring semester. The regular business meetings are secret. 
The Board of Trustees prohibits any other secret organizations. 

Play-Likers. The College Theatre is operated by the Play-Likers 
under the guidance of a Faculty Director and the staff of the Drama 
Sequence division of the Department of English. Plays are presented 
as a part of the Lecture Bureau program and are open to the college 
and community public. During the more than twenty-five years of their 
existence the Play-Likers have staged hundreds of plays for audiences 
totaling approximately ten thousand persons each year. 

The work of this organization satisfies the need for entertainment 
of high standard and provides an outlet for practical laboratory work 
of the student majoring in dramatic art and taking the technical 
courses in the Drama Sequence. The work, both extra-curricular and 
in class, is exceptional in the undergraduate field. 

To recognize unusual merit and to distinguish the superior student 
in dramatics and workers in the College Theatre, membership is awarded 
in the Zeta Omega chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dra- 
matic fraternity, established at Woman's College some years ago. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Woman's College Section, Alpha Chapter of 
North Carolina, Phi Beta Kappa. Candidates for the A.B. degree who 
have high scholastic averages are eligible for election to Phi Beta Kappa. 
Ordinarily students are elected in the senior year, but juniors of excep- 
tionally high scholastic standing are also elected. Alumnae of not less 
than ten years' standing who have distinguished themselves in the arts, 
literature, or the sciences are eligible for election to alumnae member- 



44 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

ship. The Section makes an award every year to the junior with the 
highest scholastic average for the first two years of work at the Woman's 
College. 

Pi Kappa Lambda. Tau Chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda, the only na- 
tional honorary scholastic society recognizing superior students of music. 
Elections are from the senior class. 

Sigma Delta Pi. Alpha Tau Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, the national 
Spanish fraternity. 

Omicron Nu, national home economics honor society. 

Tau Psi Omega, national French fraternity. 

Sigma Alpha, national business education honor society. 

Alpha Kappa Delta, national sociology honor fraternity. 

Phi Alpha Theta, national history honor fraternity. 

Beta Beta Beta, national honor society for students in the biological 
sciences. 

Clubs. Students who are interested in some particular sport, pastime, 
or academic pursuit will find among the college clubs an organization 
that will give encouragement and counsel. Some groups are made up of 
both students and members of the faculty, but most often they are en- 
tirely controlled by the students themselves. Among the clubs which pro- 
mote interest in sports, music, dramatics, debating, or departmental sub- 
jects are the following: Archery Club, Coraddi Club, Band, Botany Club, 
Camera Club, Chemistry Club, Choir, Classical Club, Dance Club, Dolphin 
Club, Educational Club, Glee Club, Golf Club, Home Economics Club, In- 
ternational Relations Club, Masqueraders, Mathematics Club, Medical 
Technologist Club, Music Education Club, Orchestra, Physics Club, 
Play-Likers, Seal Club, Der Singkreis, Speakers' Club, Square Dance 
Club, and Zoology Field Club. 

The Recreation Association sponsors the following activities : swim- 
ming, gymnastics, modern dance, hockey, softball, basketball, archery, 
volleyball, soccer, tennis, riding, golf, boating, and speedball. 

Alumnae Association. The Alumnae Association of the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina was organized in 1893 and 
incorporated by act of the General Assembly of North Carolina on March 
8, 1909. The objects of the Association, as set forth in Section 3 of the 
Act incorporating it, are: "To encourage, foster, and promote education 
in the State of North Carolina; to aid and assist the Woman's College 
of the University of North Carolina, by donations or otherwise; to aid 
and assist, by loans or donations, or both, worthy young women of the 
state to obtain an education at the said College, and for such purposes 
to receive, hold, invest, manage, and disburse any fund or funds which 
may come into its possession." The official publication of the Alumnae 
Association is the Alumnae News, sent to active members of the Alum- 



Organizations 45 

nae Association four times each year. In addition to keeping records on 
and attempting to maintain contact with twenty-six thousand former 
students, the Alumnae Office assists in the promotion and organization 
of local alumnae chapters throughout North Carolina and in many cities 
outside the state. Alumnae House, opened in January, 1937, is headquar- 
ters for alumnae work in general. It also provides offices for the News 
Bureau, and an assembly room for meetings of student clubs. The House 
is available for official alumnae, student, and college affairs — social, cul- 
tural, and educational. Officers for 1952-1953 are: President, Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Sloan Swain, Raleigh; First Vice-President, Miss Annie Lee 
Singletary, Winston- S alem ; Second Vice-President, Mrs. Louise Dannen- 
baum Falk, Greensboro; Recording Secretary, Miss Jean Dickey, Dur- 
ham; Executive Secretary, Mrs. Betty Brown Jester, Greensboro. 

The Home Economics Foundation. The Home Economics Founda- 
tion was incorporated in July, 1946, with headquarters at the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, North 
Carolina. The corporation is a charitable, nonprofit, and educational or- 
ganization, having no capital stock. Its members shall include such 
individuals, firms, and corporations as shall meet the terms and condi- 
tions for membership as are prescribed from time to time by the by- 
laws of the corporation. The management of the corporation and its 
properties shall be vested in a Board of Directors, which shall have full 
power and authority to act. 

The purposes of the Home Economics Foundation are: (1) To aid 
and promote through financial assistance and other means all types of 
education, both undergraduate and graduate, and research in home 
economics in order that the School of Home Economics at the Woman's 
College may serve the people, the homes, the institution, and the indus- 
tries of North Carolina with maximum values at minimum costs in 
money, time, and labor. This contribution will include foods and nutri- 
tion, clothing and textiles, housing and furnishings, child development 
and family relationships, equipment and household operations, teacher 
education, and institution administration. (2) To enable the School of 
Home Economics to develop a strong teaching and research program 
through helping to secure and keep an outstanding and highly trained 
faculty. (3) To enable the School of Home Economics to offer short 
service courses throughout the state by correspondence, by radio, and 
by special courses, forums, and conferences on various subjects of home 
economics. (4) To enable the School of Home Economics to publish and 
distribute service bulletins and reports of research and studies on various 
subjects of home economics. (5) To enable the School of Home Eco- 
nomics to sponsor various projects for improving the home, industrial, 
and institutional life of this state. 

The Home Economics Foundation will serve the homemakers, the 
teachers, the public schools, the state departments and agencies, the 
hospitals, the clinics and other care institutions, the farmers, the food 



46 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

processors, the merchants, the manufacturers, the hotels, the restau- 
rants, and the public utilities of the state. 

All funds contributed to the Foundation will be used for the pur- 
chase of special and additional equipment and teaching materials, for 
the supplementing of salaries of professors, instructors, and research 
specialists, and for the publication and distribution of papers, bulletins, 
and books, all in the interest of the development and service of the 
School of Home Economics in the Woman's College to the people, homes, 
and industries of North Carolina and the South. All funds solicited and 
collected for the Foundation will be applied as the donor requests in so 
far as is consistent with the program adopted. 

The officers of the Foundation are: President, Mrs. R. S. Ferguson, 
Taylorsville; Vice-Presidents, Mrs,. E. B. Hunter, Charlotte; Thurmond 
Chatham, Elkin; Charles A. Cannon, Kannapolis; Sam Blount, Wash- 
ington; Mrs. B. B. Everett, Palmyra; A. G. Meyers, Gastonia; H. D. 
Bateman, Wilson; and George S. Coble, Lexington; Secretary, Mrs. 
L. L. Miller, Raleigh; Treasurer, John C. Lockhart, Greensboro. 

Further information regarding the Home Economics Foundation may 
be secured by writing to Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham of the 
Woman's College. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placement office, with the co-operation of department heads, 
assists students to secure positions in the field of their choice. The office 
maintains complete files for the information of prospective employers, 
many of whom send their representatives to the campus to interview 
candidates for positions. The services of the Placement office are avail- 
able without charge to all students and alumnae of the College. 

STUDENT AID 

Financial aid for students who are in need is available through self- 
help work, scholarships, and loan funds. Many students earn a portion 
of their expenses by working in the dining halls, in the library, in offices, 
and in laboratories. Scholarships and loan funds are listed on pages 
53-61. All applications for student aid should be addressed to the Stu- 
dent Aid officer, Mrs. C. G. Hawkins. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Bulletins and Catalogues: Issued quarterly by the College; these 
contain matters of general and specific interest to the citizens of the 
state, to the faculty and prospective students, and to the College as 
a whole. 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of the Alum- 
nae Association. 

The Carolinian: The College newspaper, issued Friday of each week. 



Public Relations 47 

The Coraddi: The literary magazine of the College, issued quarterly. 

New Books in the Library : A monthly list of the new books acquired 
by the library. 

The North Carolina Parent-Teacher Bulletin: Published monthly in 
co-operation with the North Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Pine Needles: The College annual. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Extension Division. The Extension Division of the University of 
North Carolina desires to render aid to teachers in service by arrang- 
ing for technical courses for credit toward a degree or certificate, and 
to offer to them and to other citizens of the state cultural and profes- 
sional courses. The state does not provide this service except as it may 
be self-supporting; but afternoon or evening courses can be arranged 
at a minimum cost to persons on or off the campus. Lecture series by 
members of the faculty can also be arranged. Guilford County and 
counties adjacent to Guilford are the special field of the Woman's 
College. 

As a part of the extension work of the College, the Library offers 
its services to the people of the state, particularly to teachers and 
alumnae. With the co-operation of the faculty on technical and highly 
specialized subjects, it acts as an information bureau in answering 
questions. In addition, it sends out books on many subjects, especially 
women's problems and books of professional interest to teachers, pro- 
vided that these books are not in demand on the campus. 

Conferences. A series of conferences, usually concentrated in the 
summer, are held on the campus. These conferences are planned as a 
service to the state and as a contribution particularly to girls and women 
who may participate in them. 

Promotion. Through the Department of Public Relations representa- 
tives visit high schools to give information regarding college opportuni- 
ties. The college welcomes the opportunity to participate in College 
Days, Career Days, Vocational Conferences, etc., in high schools. 

News Bureau. The college maintains a news bureau for the purpose 
of publicizing college events and for providing information to people 
of the state regarding the activities of the campus and the members 
of the student body. Mr. Albert A. Wilkinson is in charge of the News 
Bureau. 

For further information regarding the services of the Department 
of Public Relations address Mr. Charles W. Phillips, Director of Public 
Relations. 



III. EXPENSES 

RESIDENCE 

It is assumed that students know their correct residence status and 
that on their application and registration blanks they state truthfully 
the facts concerning it. Students in doubt should request clarification 
by writing to the Chancellor, preferably in advance of registration. 

The residence of a student is that of her parents or of her guardian 
unless she can show reason why her residence should not be so defined. 

Mere ownership of property or payment of taxes apart from resi- 
dence does not qualify one as a resident. 

All except bona fide residents of North Carolina must pay out-of- 
state tuition. The bona fide resident is one who has lived in North 
Carolina for at least six months next preceding the date of proposed 
enrollment, and who continues to live in North Carolina throughout her 
enrollment in the College. 



EXPENSES 

The College is organized and operated on the basis of a full scholas- 
tic year as a unit. Therefore all charges listed are for the full scholastic 
year and are due and payable in advance, but for the convenience of 
the students, charges may be paid at the times listed on the following 
pages. It is necessary that all bills be paid on dates specified. 

The College reserves the right, with the approval of the proper 
authorities, to make changes at any time in any of the charges listed. 

All students are supposed to matriculate for the full year, and must 
not expect any fees or dues remitted on account of their irregularities 
or change in plans, except in case of a serious illness which makes it 
necessary for the College physician to advise them to return home. All 
checks and money orders should be made payable to The Woman's Col- 
lege of the University of North Carolina. 

In all business matters, the College prefers to deal directly with the 
students rather than with their parents or guardians. This gives the 
students business experience and makes them realize the cost of their 
training. 



48 



Expenses 49 

For Students Living in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

Tuition $150.00 $360.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee 10.00 10.00 

Board (9 months) 270.00 270.00 

Room rent (9 months) 60.00 60.00 

Laundry 30.00 30.00 

Other fees and charges 26.00 26.00 



$561.00 $771.00 

Entertainment fee 1 9.50 9.50 

Student Activities fee2 10.50 10.50 



$581.00 $791.00 

Note: The $10.00 room reservation fee is due when the student re- 
ceives a statement of her admission to the College. There will be no 
refund of this fee after August 1. Each student is expected to bring 
for her own use the following: a pillow, bed linen, blankets (two pairs) 
bedspreads, and towels. 



For Students Not Living in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

Tuition $150.00 $360.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee 10.00 10.00 

Other fees and charges 26.00 26.00 

$201.00 $411.00 

Entertainment fee 1 9.50 9.50 

Student Activities fee2 10.50 10.50 



$221.00 $431.00 

In addition to the amounts heretofore listed, students must purchase 
a gymnasium outfit costing approximately $17.45. (Commercial students 
are charged $12.45 for gymnasium suit.) A fee of $1.00 will be charged 



a This fee admits to the Civic Music concerts and the lecture program of the College 
and certain other college-wide activities. 

^his fee was voted by the student body and approved by the administration. It pays 
membership or participation in the Student Government, the Y. W. C. A., the four 
societies, the Carolinian, the Coraddi, the Athletic Association, and other college-wide 
activities. For an additional payment of $4.00, the student may obtain a copy of the 
annual, Pine Needles. 



50 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

for rental of lock for gymnasium locker. A laboratory fee of $1.25 will 
be charged for the chest X-ray record which is required of every new 
student. 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will be due as fol- 
lows, in advance: 

For Students Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

Room reservation fee $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

On entrance 155.00 225.00 

November 15 140.00 205.00 

January 15 155.00 215.00 

March 15 121.00 136.00 



$581.00 $791.00 

For Students Not Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

On entrance $ 59.00 $122.00 

November 15 52.00 94.00 

January 15 59.00 122.00 

March 15 51.00 93.00 



$221.00 $431.00 

In addition to the above, for students taking private instruction in 
all departments of Applied Music, Instrumental, or Special Vocal Music, 
for each course : 

On entrance $15.00 

November 15 15.00 

January 15 15.00 

March 15 15.00 



$60.00 



Fee for the Use of Practice Piano or for Voice Practice 

Juniors and seniors in the B.M. course, $18.00 for the year. 
Freshmen and sophomores in the B.M. course, $14.00 for the year. 
Other music students, $9.00 for the year. 

Fee for Organ Practice 

One hour per week on the three-manual organ, $9.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two-manual organ, $5.00 for the year. 



Expenses 51 

Fee for Violin and Other Orchestral Instruments, Practice Room 

Freshmen and sophomores in the B.M. course, $7.00 for the year. 
Juniors and seniors in the B.M. course, $9.00 for the year. 
Other violin students, $4.50 for the year. 

A special fee of $45.00 for the year is charged for the two courses, 
Music 335 and 336. 

PAYMENT FOR NEW STUDENTS ENTERING THE 
SECOND SEMESTER 

For Students Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

On entrance $165.00 $225.00 

March 15 140.00 185.00 



$305.00 $410.00 



For Students Not Boarding in Residence Halls 

In State Out of State 

On entrance $ 60.50 $115.50 

March 15 50.00 100.00 



$110.50 $215.50 

LABORATORY FEES 

To defray the cost of materials used by the student in her laboratory 
work, certain fees will be charged, ranging in amount from $1.00 to 
$8.00 according to the course taken. These fees must be paid on the 
day of registration, and no student may be enrolled in a course until 
the required fee is paid. These fees are listed in course descriptions 
appearing elsewhere in the catalogue. 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

Additional expenses at the College will be the cost of textbooks, gym- 
nasium outfit, and diagnostic X-ray films, and a fee of $7.50 for 
graduation. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for some form of applied music only (piano, 
organ, voice, violin) pay $75.00. One-half of this sum is payable on 
entrance and the other half at the beginning of the spring semester. 



52 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

For day students who take six semester hours of work or less the 
charge is $5.00 a semester hour for bona fide residents of North Caro- 
lina and $12.00 per semester hour for all others. Students who register 
for more than six semester hours will be charged regular fees, as speci- 
fied on the preceding pages. 

Special students may audit not more than two courses. The charge 
is $5.00 per course. This charge includes the privilege of being present 
in the classroom, but not participating in class discussion or laboratory 
or studio work. 

TEXTBOOKS 

Students are required to purchase their textbooks. For their con- 
venience the College maintains a depository, where all necessary books 
may be had at list prices. Students are advised to bring any useful 
reference books they may already have. 

See also Graduate School. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Arranged alphabetically by the key word in the name of the fellow- 
ship or scholarship. 

Alex Mathews Arnett Memorial Scholarship Fund. Mr. C. Y. 
Stephens of Laurel, Maryland, established this fund as a memorial to 
Alex Mathews Arnett, former professor of history at the Woman's Col- 
lege. A sum of $1,000 annually is to be used to aid worthy and needy 
students. 

The Borden Home Economics Scholarship Award. The Borden 
Company Foundation, Incorporated, New York City, established at the 
Woman's College an annual scholarship award in the amount of $300. 
All senior students majoring in home economics who have included in 
their curricula two or more courses in food and nutrition shall be eligible 
for the award. A student will be selected from those eligible on the 
basis of highest scholastic achievement prior to the senior year. 

The Hennie Bynum Fund. The late Judge John Gray Bynum be- 
queathed to the College $1,000, the income from which is used to aid 
young women from the Presbyterian Church of Morganton, North 
Carolina. 

The Mary Channing Coleman Memorial Fund. This fund is estab- 
lished by the staff and the graduates of the Department of Physical 
Education in memory of Miss Mary Channing Coleman, who was head 
of the department from 1920 until her death in 1947. The fund offers a 
scholarship for graduate work in Health, Physical Education, and Rec- 
reation. The scholarship is awarded to a senior candidate for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. If there is no member 
of the graduating class who meets the conditions of the scholarship 
committee, the committee shall have the right to award the scholarship 
to a student who has completed her undergraduate professional educa- 
tion at the Woman's College within the preceding five years. A com- 
mittee shall be appointed by the Chancellor to assist in making the 
award. 

The Danforth Summer Fellowships. The Danforth Foundation of 
St. Louis, Missouri, has established two annual fellowships at the 
Woman's College for home economics majors. Each fellowship covers 
the expenses of the respective award. The recipients of these fellow- 
ships are selected by the home economics faculty. One fellowship is to 
an outstanding junior in home economics for four weeks of study, travel, 
and recreation in July and August, two weeks in St. Louis and two 
weeks at Camp Miniwanca of the American Youth Foundation on Lake 

53 



54 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Michigan. The other fellowship is to an outstanding freshman in home 
economics for two weeks of study and recreation in August at Camp 
Miniwanca. 

The Harriet Elliott Social Science Forum Fund. This fund has 
been set up as a memorial to Dean Harriet Elliott, who was for many- 
years a professor of political science at the College and Dean of Women 
for twelve years. The income from the fund will be used for the support 
of the annual Social Science Forum and for the establishment of scholar- 
ships or fellowships in political science. 

Escheats Fund. A number of scholarships valued at $100 or more 
are given each year to students who are residents of North Carolina, 
through the Escheats Fund of the consolidated University of North 
Carolina. 

The Roxie Armfield King Scholarship. The Roxie Armfield King 
Scholarship Fund is made possible through the generosity of the late 
Mrs. Roxie Armfield King, a long-time resident of Guilford County. 
Mrs. King bequeathed to the Woman's College of the University of 
North Carolina a substantial sum, the income from which is to be used 
for the purpose of establishing this scholarship fund to give encourage- 
ment and financial assistance to worthy students who are residents of 
North Carolina. 

Kroger Scholarships. The Kroger Company provides two $200 
scholarships for freshman students in home economics. Awards are 
made on the basis of scholastic achievements in high school as well as 
leadership qualities demonstrated in school, church, and youth organi- 
zations. Need for financial aid may also be considered. 

The Mrs. Charles D. McIver Memorial Scholarship. This scholar- 
ship was established from a legacy of the late Dr. Anna M. Gove. The 
income from the $5,000 gift is to be awarded "every other year as a 
scholarship to some capable, well-trained and upright Junior or Senior 
who is planning to study for and secure the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine." 

The Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Gertrude Whittier Menden- 
hall, head of the Department of Mathematics from the founding of the 
College until her death in 1926, left to the College a fund of $2,091.41 
to endow a scholarship to be named in honor of her aunt, Judith J. 
Mendenhall. The will provides that a faculty committee award the 
scholarship annually to a deserving student "who has made good records 
in preparatory and freshman mathematics and who desires to do higher 
work in mathematics and allied sciences." 

Palmyra Pharr Scholarship Fund. Dr. Fred W. Morrison, a for- 
mer member of the College faculty, established this fund in 1942 in 
honor of his mother, Palmyra Pharr Morrison, and has made subsequent 



Fellowships and Scholarships 55 

additions to the fund. The value of the fund is $32,816.00. At present 
both principal and income are to be used to aid students designated by 
Dr. Morrison with the advice of the Committee on Loans and Scholar- 
ships. Preference will be given to students from Rowan and Cabarrus 
counties. 

Phi Beta Kappa Award. The Woman's College Section of the Alpha 
Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in North Carolina makes every fall an award 
of $25 to that junior who in her first two years at the Woman's College 
has made the highest average in her class. 

Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholarship Fund. Mrs. Elizabeth Reeves 
Lyon, Class of 1938, has established the Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholar- 
ship Fund in honor of her mother. The income from the funds invested 
shall be used to support a scholarship which shall be awarded annually 
to a student registered or registering as an art major in the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina. 

Scholarship in Science. The Faculty Science Club offers a scholar- 
ship in science. This scholarship is awarded to a rising junior, a rising 
senior, or a graduating senior of the Woman's College majoring in any 
department represented in the Science Club. The award is made on the 
basis of scholarship, personality, and financial need. The fund for the 
award consists of a percentage of the dues of members of the Science 
Club, of contributions which the various student organizations in science 
may make, and of gifts from members of the Science Club and from 
others interested in science. 

Sears-Roebuck Foundation Scholarships. Scholarships of $100 or 
more are given each year to a limited number of graduates of North 
Carolina high schools who wish to enter the School of Home Economics. 
Funds for the scholarships are provided by the Sears-Roebuck Founda- 
tion. Preference is given to students from rural areas and awards are 
made on the basis of need, scholastic record in high school, participation 
in 4-H club projects and other community activities. 

The Anna Howard Shaw Scholarship Fund. The late Miss Lucy 
B. Anthony of Moylan, Pennsylvania, established this fund to keep alive 
the memory of Dr. Anna Howard Shaw. The scholarship is awarded 
annually to an outstanding student in the field of social science. 

The United Daughters op the Confederacy Scholarship. The 
North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy 
offers twelve scholarships at Woman's College to descendants of Con- 
federate veterans. These scholarships are worth from $120.00 to 
$150.00 each. 

Consolidated University Graduate Scholarship. The University 
at Chapel Hill offers a graduate scholarship of $350.00 each year to a 
graduate of the Woman's College. The student must pay the tuition 



56 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

charges ($150.00). Applications are made to the Administrative Board, 
Woman's College Division of the Graduate School. 

Sarah McIntosh Wade Scholarship. This scholarship was estab- 
lished in 1949 by Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Phillips, in memory of Mrs. Phil- 
lips's mother, Sarah Mcintosh Wade of Beaufort, North Carolina. Pref- 
erence will be given an eastern North Carolina girl with a rural back- 
ground, and one who is doing some self-help work. The amount is a 
minimum of $50.00, and will be awarded annually. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. The late Mrs. Henry Weil of Golds- 
boro, North Carolina, established at the College in memory of her hus- 
band a fund now amounting to $24,000.00, known as the Henry Weil 
Fellowship Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to a mem- 
ber of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the class 
who meets the conditions of the award, the committee shall have 
the right to award the fellowship to a member of any class grad- 
uating within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Chancellor to assist in mak- 
ing the award. 

The Mina Weil Endowment Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Bluethenthal 
established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her mother. The in- 
come from this fund is granted for scholarships. 

The Mina Weil Memorial Scholarship. In memory of her mother, 
Mrs. Mina Weil, Miss Gertrude Weil has given $3,000 for the establish- 
ment of a scholarship in the social sciences. The income from this fund 
will be awarded annually to a member of the junior or senior class who 
is majoring in a social science. The student shall be selected by a com- 
mittee from the social science faculty, appointed by the Chancellor. 

The Winfield Endowment. Miss Martha Elizabeth Winfield, for 
many years a professor of English in the College, left an endowment of 
$3,000. The income is awarded each year as a scholarship to a junior 
or senior of promise in the Department of English who is in need of 
financial assistance. 



LOAN FUNDS 

Arranged alphabetically by the key word in the name of the fund. 

It is the general policy of the Loan Fund Committee to give prefer- 
ence to applications from juniors and seniors in their borrowing. The 
total amount for any student is limited. Loans that are made are based 
somewhat on the scholarship of the student as well as on her financial 
needs. 

All loans are secured by notes, signed by the borrower and two guar- 
antors. For most loans, interest at three per cent begins in June after 
graduation or after withdrawal from college. Some funds draw interest 
from the date of the note. 

The Alamance County Chapter of the Alumnae Association 
established a loan fund. It is now $419.00. Students from Alamance 
County are eligible for aid from this fund. 

The Alumnae Class Organ Fund, now amounting to $807.00, was 
established as a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. This will 
then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Alumnae Loan and Scholarship Fund. For the purpose of 
making loans to worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, who could 
not return to college without aid, the Alumnae Association raised a 
fund. This fund amounts to $34,070.00. 

The Washington, D. C, Chapter of the Alumnae Association 
established a loan fund. It is now $209.00. 

The Sarah Atkinson Loan Fund was established by the Class of 
1939 and the Art Club as a memorial to Sarah Atkinson, a member of 
the Class of 1939. Family, friends, and students have contributed to 
the fund to the extent of $289.00. This will be used to aid worthy 
students. 

Emily S. Austin Loan Fund. Miss Emily S. Austin, Class of '01, 
has established this fund of $500.00. Preference is given to students from 
Edgecombe County. 

Mrs. James Boyd, Southern Pines, North Carolina, contributed 
$300.00 to be used as a loan fund. 

The Bryant Loan Fund. The Bryant Loan Fund of $7,500 be- 
queathed to the College by the late Victor S. Bryant, of Durham, North 
Carolina, is in constant use. Notes made from this loan fund bear six 
per cent interest from the date of the loan. 



57 



58 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Gladys Bullock Memorial Loan Fund. Mrs. S. F. Bullock of 
Stem, North Carolina, established a loan fund of $300.00 as a memorial 
to her daughter, Gladys Bullock, Class of 1927. 

The Daphne Carraway Memorial Loan Fund. Miss Irma Carra- 
way, Class of 1897, established this loan fund in memory of her sister, 
Daphne Carraway, Class of 1902. Graduates of the Barium Springs 
Orphanage have the preference to these loans. The amount of this fund 
is $623.00. 

The Class of 1925 established a loan fund of $100. It is now $179.00. 

The Class of 1929 Loan Fund. The class of 1929 established a loan 
fund. It is now $540.00. 

The Class of 1932 gave a fund of $150.00 to be used as a loan until 
the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1933 gave $75.00 as a loan fund. 

The Class of 1935 gave a fund to be used as a loan. It is now 
$441.00. 

The Class of 1936 established a loan fund of $275.00. This will be 
used for loans until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1940 established a loan fund of $150.00. 

The Judge E. B. Cline Loan Fund of $50.00 was established by the 
late Mrs. Cline in memory of her husband. Students from Hickory or 
Catawba County are given preference for aid from this fund. 

The Laura H. Coit Loan Fund is being given by students of the 
College. It is now $4,014.00. 

The Ida Haughton Cowan Loan Fund. Miss Ida H. Cowan, Class 
of 1902, gave a loan fund in memory of her mother. It is now $227.00. 

Federation of Women's Clubs Music Loan Fund. A fund of $200.00 
was established by the Federation of Women's Clubs. The loans are 
granted to residents of North Carolina, preference being given to juniors 
and seniors. 

Mollie K. Fetzer Loan Fund. This loan was established by T. J. 
Fetzer as a memorial to his sister. It is now $642.00. 

The Mary Foust and Caroline McNeill Loan Fund was estab- 
lished jointly by Dr. J. I. Foust, late President, and Mrs. J. I. Foust in 
memory of Mary Foust Armstrong and Carolina McNeill. The fund is 
now $1,187.00. 



Loan Funds 59 

Gray Hall Loan Fund. The students of Gray Hall have established 
a loan fund which will be increased by the students from that hall from 
year to year. 

Martha Irvin Groome Memorial Loan Fund. Mrs. Ina Lee Groome, 
Class of 1934, has established this fund in memory of Mrs. Martha Irvin 
Groome. Students in the School of Home Economics are eligible for aid 
from the fund. 

The Claude Heath Loan Fund. Mrs. W. O. Nisbet of Charlotte, 
North Carolina, established a fund in 1938 in memory of her brother, 
Mr. Claude Heath. The fund amounts to $119.00. 

The Home Economics Club established a loan fund which amounts 
to $545.00. 

Lucille Horn Memorial Fund. The Alumnae of Davie County have 
established this fund to aid students from Davie County. 

Mr. J. B. Ivey of Charlotte, North Carolina, gave $300.00 to be 
known as The J. B. Ivey Student Loan Fund. 

The North Carolina Association of Jewish Women established a 
loan fund for emergency aid to students in case of serious illness. It is 
now $267.00. 

The Liberty Hall Chapter Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion Membership Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund. The loan fund 
was established in June, 1935, as a memorial to members of the chap- 
ter. The fund now amounts to $2,020.00. It is available to juniors and 
seniors. 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler Loan Fund. This fund was established by 
Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first woman principal of the College, in 
memory of her niece. This fund is now $285.00. 

The Katharine Mavity Martin Loan Fund. The faculty wives 
through their organization gave to the College the Katharine Mavity 
Martin Loan Fund of $300.00 for use in emergencies. This fund is a 
memorial to Mrs. Katharine Mavity Martin, wife of W. W. Martin, 
retired, professor of psychology at the College. 

The Masonic Theatre Educational Loan Fund of New Bern. The 
Scottish Rite Masons of Eastern North Carolina contributed a loan fund 
of $200.00. It is now $374.00. 

The McIver Loan Fund. As a memorial to the founder and first 
President of the College, the Alumnae Association raised the McIver 
Loan Fund, now amounting to $14,910.00. 

Miss Jessie McLean gave $50.00 to be used as a loan for students 
needing special medical attention. It is now $81.00. 



60 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The General Medical Fund of $177.00 was established for use as 
a loan fund for emergency aid to students needing special medical 
attention. 

Methodist Student Loan Fund. This is a limited fund available in 
small amounts to Methodist students who are meeting fully all of the 
requirements of the Board of Education of the Methodist Church. 

The Lily Conally Morehead Loan Fund. The late Mrs. Lily 
Mebane, of Spray, North Carolina, gave $4,170.00 as a nucleus of a loan 
fund in memory of her mother. The fund is now $6,636.00. 

The Musgrove Memorial Fund. Mrs. Jeannette Musgrove Bounds, 
Class of 1914, established a loan fund of $100.00 in memory of her 
father. It is now $173.00. 

May Oettinger Memorial Loan Fund. This fund has been estab- 
lished by the Business and Professional Women's Club of Kinston, N. C, 
as a memorial to Miss May Oettinger. The recipient of any part of the 
loan fund shall be a bona fide graduate of one of the Lenoir County 
high schools. 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial Loan Fund. This was estab- 
lished in 1932 by Mr. John J. Phoenix and family in memory of his 
daughter. It is now $284.00. 

The Helen Lee Pickard Memorial Fund. A fund has been estab- 
lished by friends and the family of the late Helen Lee Pickard, former 
member of the administrative staff of the College. This fund is used 
for aiding worthy students. 

The Eunice Kirkpatrick Rankin Loan Fund. This fund of $270.00 
was established by the Atlanta Alumnae Club in memory of Mrs. Eunice 
Kirkpatrick Rankin, a member of the Class of 1901 and a former presi- 
dent of this club. The fund is to be used preferably, but not necessarily, 
to aid a student from Georgia. 

The Camilla Croom Rodman Scholarships. The late Col. W. B. 
Rodman of Norfolk, Virginia, established two scholarships in memory 
of his mother. One scholarship is to be awarded to a student from Hyde 
County and the other to a student from the state at large. This is a 
loan fund except when descendants of Colonel Rodman are designated. 

The Winfield H. Rogers Fund. The Quill Club of 1947 has estab- 
lished a loan fund of $177.00 in memory of Dr. Winfield H. Rogers, 
former head of the Department of English. English majors are eligible 
for loans from this fund. 

The Royal Arch and Knights Templar Loan Fund was estab- 
lished in the fall of 1921. It is now $3,392.00. 



Loan Funds 61 

Student Government Fund of 1935. This fund was established as 
a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. It amounts to $315.00. 

The Students' Loan Fund was established in 1892-1893. It is made 
up of funds given by a number of friends of the College. Among these 
are the following: Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, who gave the Ade- 
laide Worth Daniels Fund; Mrs. J. C. Buxton; General and Mrs. Julian 
S. Carr; Charles Broadway Rouss; and Mr. and Mrs. V. Everit Macy. 
This fund now amounts to $7,302.00. 

Mary McLean Taylor Memorial Fund. Carrie McLean Taylor, 
Class of 1926, has established a loan fund of $300.00 as a memorial to 
her mother, Mary McLean Taylor. Preference will be given to students 
of the one-year commercial course. 

The Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund. The late Mrs. 
C. W. Tillett of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1933 to 1935 donated 
$100.00 yearly to the College for a gift scholarship. In September, 1935, 
she founded the Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund with an 
initial gift of $100.00. This fund is available for juniors and seniors, 
preferably seniors. It is a memorial to Mr. Tillett's small daughter, 
Carrie MacRae Tillett. 

Town Students' Loan Fund. The Town Students' organization 
established a loan fund of $75.00. The money is to be lent in small 
amounts to junior, senior, and commercial town students needing finan- 
cial assistance. 

Ruth Gooding Worley Fund. Mrs. Ruth Worley Simmons, an alum- 
na of the College, and the other children of Mrs. Ruth Gooding Worley 
established this fund of $100.00 in memory of their mother. 

Doris Wright Memorial Fund. This fund of $1,000.00 was contrib- 
uted by friends of the late C. C. Wright, Superintendent of Education 
in Wilkes County. This fund is used for aiding students from Wilkes 
County. It is now $2,133.00. 



IV. ADMISSION 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants for admission to the College should be at least sixteen 
years of age, of good character, and in good physical condition. 

Students are admitted by certificate or by examination. Those ad- 
mitted by certificate must be graduates of standard secondary schools 
and must be recommended by the school. The College reserves the right 
to reject any applicant who ranked in the lower half of her graduat- 
ing class. For cause the Committee on Admissions may disapprove any 
application for admission. 

A report from the applicant's physician is required. Blanks for this 
purpose are furnished with the application blanks and must be returned 
when the application for admission is submitted. 

Early application is advisable. Rooms in the residence halls are 
assigned in order of application, and applications will not be accepted 
after all rooms have been assigned. The $10.00 room reservation fee 
should be sent upon receipt of a statement of admission. 

Requests for application forms or other communications concerning 
admission should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission to the freshman class must be a graduate 
of a standard secondary school and must present at least fifteen accept- 
able units of credit. 

Ten and one-half units are prescribed for admission to candidacy 
for any degree. They are English 4, algebra 1%, plane geometry 1, 
foreign language (two years of one language) 2, and social science 2, 
one of which must be in history. For the degrees of Bachelor of Science 
in Home Economics, Physical Education, and Nursing, 1 unit of 
science 1 is required. For the Bachelor of Arts in Music or the Bachelor 
of Music, 2 units of music are required. This work is usually taken in 
private lessons. For the Bachelor of Fine Arts with a major in art, 1 
unit of typewriting is required. It is strongly recommended that two 
languages be taken with 4 units submitted for admission. However, 
students who have not completed the two years of foreign language but 
who are otherwise qualified for admission are encouraged to submit their 
credentials and will be given special consideration if their records 
warrant. It is also recommended that 2 units of science (chemistry* 
biology, or physics) be submitted for admission. 

It is strongly recommended that the 2% to 4% elective units be 
made up from the fields of mathematics (second-year algebra for a full 
year, solid geometry for a half year, and plane trigonometry for a half 



1 Biology, chemistry, general science, or physics. 

62 



Admission 63 

year) ; social science (ancient history, medieval and modern history, 
modern history, English history, American history, American history 
and civics as a combination, civics, sociology, and economics) ; foreign 
language (French, German, Spanish, Latin, and Greek, with not fewer 
than 2 units in any one) ; and science with full laboratory (chemistry, 
physics, biology, botany, zoology, geology, physiography, and general 
science). One unit is allowed for a full year's work in any one of the 
named sciences provided lectures or recitations and laboratory work are 
involved; if no laboratory work is included, any one of the named 
sciences, taken for a full year, carries only a half unit of credit. Other 
elective subjects allowed are: art, Bible, music, and speech, a half or 
1 unit each; vocational subjects (which include shorthand and type- 
writing, 1 unit; bookkeeping, 1 unit; commercial arithmetic, 1 unit; 
home economics, 2 units; and commercial geography, a half unit), 3 
units, maximum generally allowed. 

A credit of a half unit is allowed in very few subjects; less than a 
half unit will not be allowed in any subject. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students entering with advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the freshman class. 

An applicant for admission from another college should send to the 
Registrar: (I) an official statement of entrance and college records; 
(2) a catalogue of the institution from which she transfers, marked to 
indicate the courses taken; and (3) a statement of honorable dismisal. 
It is desirable that there be sent to the Registrar before May 1 an 
official transcript of the applicant's entrance and college record of work 
to the end of the first semester of the year prior to her transfer. This 
certificate should include a statement of the subjects being pursued 
during the second semester, together with the number of hours of credit 
to be secured in each. The letter of honorable dismissal and the final 
record of the second semester should be sent to the Registrar before 
July 1. 

An average of at least C is required for admission to advanced 
standing. After admission an average of at least C must be maintained 
by all transfer students who enter the junior class. The standing of 
the college previously attended and the quality as well as the quantity 
of the student's work will receive consideration when credit is estimated. 
Should the student's work during her first year at this College prove 
unsatisfactory, the amount of credit allowed may be reduced. 

ADMISSION OF SERVICE WOMEN 

The Woman's College is on the approved list of the Veterans Admin- 
istration and may accept students for regular, retraining, or refresher 
courses under the provisions of the Service Men's Readjustment Act 
of 1944, Public Law Number 346. 

For more detailed information, write the Director of Admissions. 



V. DEGREES 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

The College offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
with an opportunity for major work in sixteen fields and in five inter- 
departmental majors; Bachelor of Science, with majors in four profes- 
sional fields; Bachelor of Music, with a major in Music; and Bachelor 
of Fine Arts, with a major in Art. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. A 
freshman whose proficiency in composition and in reading is below col- 
legiate standard shall be enrolled in English A. without credit, until 
the required standard is attained and she can be admitted to English 
101. A deficient student may also be asked to work one or two hours 
a week in a special section in remedial English while taking English 
101. Any undergraduate whose work in any course gives evidence of 
lack of proficiency in written English or in reading ability shall be 
referred to the Department of English; she will then be sent to a section 
in remedial English to correct her deficiencies. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is the 
completion of 122 semester hours with 204 quality points. The hours re- 
quired must include: 

S.H. 

Englishi 101-102, 211-212 12 

Social Sciences 2 12 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 3 12 

Foreign Languages 4 (one) 12 

or a reading knowledge 5 

Health 101 3 

Major Subjects 24 to 42 

Physical Education 2 



'See the statement above regarding the English proficiency requirement. 

2 Six hours must be in history (usually History 101-102) ; the remaining six may be 
in history, government, economics, sociology, or geography. See footnote 3. 

3 Six hours must be taken in biology, chemistry, or physics ; the remaining six may 
be in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, Psychology 211-212, or Geography 211- 
212. Geography 211-212 may be taken in partial fulfillment of the natural science re- 
quirement; certain courses in regional and economic geography may be taken in partial 
fulfillment of the social science requirement, but no student may offer geography in 
partial fulfilment of both requirements. 

4 A student continuing in college a language presented for entrance credit must take 
a course in advance of the work for which entrance credit has been given. 

^o prove a reading knowledge of a language, the student must take an examina- 
tion, the result of which will be judged by accuracy in understanding the passages read. 

64 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 65 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

The specified requirements for graduation, except those in the major 
subject, must ordinarily be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. 
In exceptional cases a required subject may, with the consent of the 
adviser and the class chairman, be taken later than the freshman and 
sophomore years. 

Freshmen are expected to register for the following courses : 

English 101-102, 6 hours; foreign language, 6 hours; Biology 101- 
102, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104, Mathematics 101-102, 103-104, or 
105-106, or Physics 101-102, 6 hours; History 101-102, 6 hours; Health 
101, 3 hours, and elective, 3 hours, taken in alternate semesters; and 
physical education. Electives open to freshmen: Art 101, 103; Astron- 
omy 101; Biology 121; Classical Civilization 111; English 105, 107, 111; 
Geography 101; History 105; Music 127; Sociology 111. 

Some exceptions to these requirements follow: 

Pre-medical students and those preparing to be laboratory techni- 
cians are advised to take biology and chemistry in the freshman year 
and two sciences in the sophomore year. Such students need not take 
Health 101. 

Students who plan to major in mathematics and who wish to secure 
a certificate to teach general science also are advised to choose both 
mathematics and a science in the freshman year. 

Freshmen may take 4 hours of applied music of college grade pro- 
vided that a music faculty committee grants permission after an en- 
trance test in performance. Any first registration for credit in applied 
music must be preceded by a successful examination before a music fac- 
ulty committee. Twelve hours is the maximum credit allowed. 

Sophomores are expected to register for the following courses: 

English 211-212, 6 hours; foreign language (continuation of fresh- 
man language), 6 hours; biology, chemistry, geography, mathematics, 
physics, or psychology, 6 hours; social science 6 (Grade II), 6 hours; 
electives 7 (Grade II), 6 hours. 

Courses primarily for freshmen and sophomores are designated as 
Grade I, numbered 100-199; those primarily for sophomores as Grade 
II, 200-299; those primarily for juniors and seniors as Grade III, 300- 
399. Grade IV, 400-499, indicates courses open only to seniors. Grade 
V, 500-599, includes courses open to advanced undergraduate and grad- 
uate students. Freshmen are admitted to courses of Grade II and soph- 
omores to those of Grade III only by special permission given by the 
class chairman and the instructor concerned. 



e Political Science is not open to sophomores. 

7 Sophomores planning to teach should elect Psychology 221, 222. 



66 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

JUNIOR-SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

In her junior and senior year each candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts must complete a considerable amount of work in a 
field of concentration. The selection of the field for intensive study 
shall be made by the student after consultation with her class chairman 
not later than the second semester of her sophomore year. In the field 
of concentration two types are provided: 

I. Departmental Major 

The departmental major lies within one department. The following 
subjects offer an opportunity for major work: Art, Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, English 8 , French, German, Greek, History and Political 
Science, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, 
Spanish. 

A student must take not less than 24 nor more than 36 hours above 
Grade I in the major subject. With the approval of the major depart- 
ment adviser and her class chairman, however, she may choose part 
of the major work from closely related departments. 

II. Interdepartmental and Preprofessional Majors 

Five interdepartmental majors are offered: 

Laboratory Technician 

Pre-medical 

Elementary Education 

Art, Dance, and Drama 

Recreation 

An interdepartmental major includes work in two or three depart- 
ments. When in two departments, not less than 15 hours nor more than 
21 shall be offered in one subject, the minimum total to be 36 hours 
above Grade I. When in three departments, not less than 9 hours in a 
subject shall count toward the major, the minimum total to be 42 hours. 

The specified requirements for three of the interdepartmental ma- 
jors are listed on pages 67-69. The requirements for the other two will 
be furnished upon request. 



8 A student majoring in English is permitted to take six hours in speech and/or in 
radio or play production techniques as part of her free electives. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 67 

HONORS WORK 

A program of Honors Work for very superior seniors was estab- 
lished at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 
1947. The purpose of the Honors program is to unify and deepen the 
student's grasp of the whole field of her major and to develop the stu- 
dent's intellectual initiative and independence through special study or 
research of particular interest to her. 

Requirements for Admission to the Program 

Only very superior students may be considered as candidates for 
Honors Work. 

The specific requirements for eligibility are: (1) recommendations 
from three members of the faculty, including the head and one other 
member of the department in which the student wishes to do Honors 
Work (these recommendations shall be sent to the Committee on Honors 
Work independently and shall, with the possible exception of the head 
of the department, be from members of the faculty who have taught 
the student) ; (2) a minimum average for courses taken at the Woman's 
College — 3.5 in courses in her major subject above Grade I and 3.0 
in all other courses which carry credit (both hours and quality points) 
for graduation; (3) approval of the Committee on Honors Work. 

Method of Admission to Candidacy 

Application for admission should be made by the student not later 
than May 15 of her junior year, on the regular application form. This 
form should be in the hands of the Chairman of the Committee on 
Honors Work by the date indicated. 

Work of the Candidate 

The Honors Work shall replace 6 semester hours of classroom work 
in the senior year, 3 in each semester. Approximately half of the work 
is to be devoted to an intensive study in the major subject, the other 
half to preparation for an Honors Examination in the major subject, 
both parts of the program to be carried out under the guidance of a 
member of the faculty. Upon successful completion of her Honors Work, 
the student shall receive her degree with Honors in the field of her 
major. 

More detailed information may be obtained from the Committee on 
Honors Work or from department heads. 



68 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Freshman-Sophomore 

Requirements S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

History 101-102, 211, 212 12 

Science or Mathematics 9 12 

Foreign Language (one) or a 

reading knowledge 12 

Health 101 3 

Psychology 221, 222 6 

Physical Education 2 



Elective 



59 
3 

62 



Junior-Senior 
Requirements 



S.H. 

. 15 



Education 317, 330, 481, 463*0 

Education 413, 414, 424, for 

Primary majors, or 443-444, 

446 for Grammar Grade 

majors 8 

Art 101 11 , 333 6 

Geography 335, 336 6 

Health 341 3 

Music 341, 342 6 

Political Science 321 or 322 . . . 3 

Psychology 326 .. . 3 

Physical Education 341 3 



Electives (Junior-Senior) 



53 

7 



60 
Total 122 and 204 quality points 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN ART, DANCE, AND DRAMA 
LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The purpose of this course is twofold: 

1. To correlate the arts and provide opportunity for experience and 
investigation in each of the several arts for the student who does 
not know which art she wishes to emphasize, and 

2. To provide a broad background for student who may wish to take 
professional training or to do graduate work in one of the fields 
after graduation from college. The end in view is not to produce 
finished actors, artists, or dancers. The emphasis is rather upon an 
integrated program of study that utilizes the courses in each de- 
partment most closely related to courses in other departments. 

This program is administered by a committee composed of the head 
of the Department of Art, the director of Dance in the Department of 
Physical Education, and the chairman of Drama in the Department of 
English. 



9 Six hours must be taken in biology, chemistry, or physics ; the remaining six may 
be in mathematics, biology, chemistry, Geography 211-212, or physics. 

10 Educ. 463 not required if candidate has had successful teaching experience at the 
proper level, and substitution of other courses is recommended by the Dean of the School 
of Education. 

"If Art 101 is taken as the freshman elective, three additional hours of general elec- 
tive work may be taken in the junior-senior years. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 69 

The requirements for the freshman and sophomore years are those 
of the Bachelor of Arts degree except that students are advised to take 
Art 101, Design, in the freshman year and Physical Education 145 and 
245, Dance, in the sophomore year. 

The requirements for the junior and senior years include work of 
not less than 9 hours in each of the departments of Art, English, and 
Physical Education. 

The courses required in each department, and the semester hours of 
credit, are: 

Art 373, 377, and one Grade III Art History course 9 

English 327, 329, 333, 335 12 

Physical Education 345, 346, 354, 355, 356 10 

The remaining hours of the minimum total of 42 hours required for 
an interdepartmental major in three departments will be taken accord- 
ing to the need or interest of the individual student. 

In the entire program there are 24 hours of free electives, 6 in the 
sophomore year and 18 in the junior-senior years. These 18 hours shall 
not be taken in any of the three fields involved in this major. 

In addition to the specific requirements for the junior and senior 
years, each interdepartment degree candidate is required to make a 
major contribution in each of the three fields, the nature of the contri- 
bution to be determined by the committee directing the degree program. 
The possibilities are, for example: designing the set or costumes for a 
major production of a play; choreographing a group dance for the 
annual dance recital; playing a leading role in a major production in 
drama. 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR IN RECREATION 

An interdepartmental major in Recreation leading to a Bachelor of 
Arts degree is offered by the Departments of Sociology and Physical 
Education. 

A committee composed of one member from each of the departments 
of Sociology and Physical Education administers the program. A stu- 
dent will be admitted to this major only after approval by the two de- 
partments. The following is the curriculum: 

Freshman-Sophomore Requirements 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

History 101-102, Sociology 211, 212 12 

Biology* 2 101-102, Psychology 211-212 12 

Foreign Language (one) or a reading knowledge. . 12 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 241 5 13 

Elective 6 



"Chemistry or physics may fulfill this requirement on the approval of the adviser. 
"Includes two hours of freshman-sophomore required physical education. 



70 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Junior- Senior Requirements 

Junior Year S.H. Senior Year S.H. 

Physical Education 339, 334 2 1 Economics 325 3 

Physical Education 344, 342 3 2 English 327 or 317 3 

English (Speech) 217 2 English 367 2 

Sociology 325 2 Phys. Ed. 336, or 337 1 

Sociology 333, 340 3 3 Phys. Ed. 338, 340, 343 4 

Art 336 2 Sociology 326 3 

Health 236 1 Elective Sociology . . . 3 

Political Science 322 3 Elective (B.S.) 14 2 

Elective 6 Elective 6 3 



15 15 15 15 

Summer Experience: Between the sophomore and junior years, a 
student will be expected to have a playground or camp counseling expe- 
rience, approved by the committee administering the Recreation major. 
During the summer between her junior and senior years, the committee 
will work out a summer experience suited to the student's particular 
range of interests. 

PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN SOCIAL WORK 

The Department of Sociology has planned a sequence of courses for 
those students who are preparing themselves for graduate professional 
education in social work, and also for those students who wish to 
qualify for positions in social agencies for which graduate professional 
education is not now required. This sequence follows the standards set 
by the American Association of Schools of Social Work. 

An adviser in the Department of Sociology has been assigned to ad- 
vise all students interested in the preprofessional program in social 
work. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Courses fulfilling the requirements for graduation in the fields of 
concentration shall be above Grade I. At least 36 of the student's last 
60 hours shall be of Grade III or IV, and not more than 12 of the last 
60 may be of Grade I. When, however, this regulation will work a 
special hardship upon a student, adjustments will be made by the class 
chairman and the student's adviser. 

Students desiring to teach are advised to fulfill the requirements of 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the certificate in the 



14 Two-hour elective to be taken in one of the B.S. departments other than the De- 
partment of Physical Education. If the student takes a three-hour course, only two of 
the three hours shall count in credit. Courses elected must be from those approved for 
B.A. credit. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 71 

state in which they expect to teach. For students preparing to teach in 
the high school 15 hours of Education may be credited toward the 
Bachelor of Arts degree; for those preparing to teach in the elementary 
grades, 21 hours of Education are allowed. 

Regulations Concerning B.S. and B.M. Elective Hours 

Under the restrictions noted below a certain number of hours of 
elective work chosen from the departments which give courses leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree and to the Bachelor of Music degree 
may be credited toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. The courses chosen 
must be from those approved for Bachelor of Arts credit by the Cur- 
riculum Committee and the Faculty Council. 

Also students whose major is in one of the departments with work 
leading to the B.S. or the B.M. degree may take courses in another de- 
partment offering work toward the B.S. degree, subject to the restric- 
tions listed below. 

1. Beginning in 1948-1949 any course taught in a department whose 
work leads to the B.S. or the B.M. degree shall count toward the 
maximum number of B.S. or B.M. hours to be credited toward 
the B.A. or the B.S. or the B.M. degree. 

2. Students taking the B.A. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation not more than 12 hours from the offerings of a single 
department whose work leads to the B.S. or the B.M. degree, not 
more than 15 hours from the offerings of two such departments, 
and not more than 18 if taken in more than two of these de- 
partments. 

3. Students taking the B.S. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation a maximum of 9 hours of free elective work in other 
departments whose work leads to the B.S. or the B.M. degree. 
Students taking the B.M. degree are permitted to count toward 
graduation a maximum of 9 hours of free elective work in de- 
partments whose work leads to the B.S. degree. 

These limits do not apply to the Interdepartmental Major in 
Recreation. 

The courses chosen for B.A. credit must be selected from the fol- 
lowing: 

Approved Business Education courses are: Business Education 211, 
212, 311-312, 321-322-42315, 331, 332, 351, 428, S431, 433, 501, 502, 506, 
507, and 508. Courses 211, 212, and 433 are the only courses available 
to students below the junior level. 



"Shorthand 321-322-423 may not be taken for less than nine semester hours if the 
credit is to be applied toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. 



72 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Approved Home Economics courses are: Home Economics 101, 213, 
300, 301 (limited to Art majors) , 302, 335, 341, 351, 353, 355, 446, 504, 
512, 514, 536, and 555. 

Approved Music courses are: Music 100, 101, 102, 111, 112, 127, 150, 
201, 202, 211, 212, 231, 232, 301, 302, 327, 328, 329, 338, 355, 356, applied 
Music courses to which the student may be admitted in accordance 
with the School of Music rules. 

The approved courses in the Department of Physical Education are: 
Physical Education 241, 334, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 
345, 346, 354, 355, 356. 

Certain departmental regulations govern the choice by the individual 
student of any of the above courses. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

I. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The minimum general education and major field requirements for 
the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics degree are: 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

Science 12 

Social Science^ 12 

Foreign Language (one) 12 

Art 101 3 

Home Economics 42 

Electives 27 

Physical Education 2 

12217 

The School of Home Economics offers several curricula, organized to 
meet specialized subject-matter interests and the requirements of official 
groups responsible for the accrediting of professional training courses. 

These several majors are: Teacher Training; Institution Economics; 
General Home Economics; Clothing and Textiles; Foods and Nutrition; 
Housing; Child Development and Home Relationships. 

The core Curriculum for these several majors consists of 3 hours in 
each of the following fields: Clothing, Foods, Home Furnishings, Child 
Development; 2 hours in Family Relationship; and 4 hours in Home 
Management; total, 18 hours. 

"Six of these hours must be History 101-102; for specified sequences the remaining 
six must be in economics and/or sociology. 

"A minimum of 204 quality points is required. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 73 

II. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The minimum requirement for the degree is the completion of 122 
semester hours with 204 quality points. The hours required must in- 
clude: 

S.H. 

English 101-102, English 211-212 12 

Social Science 18 12 

Natural Science 19 12 

Foreign Language 20 12 

Health 101 3 

Major Subjects (including General Physical 
Education) 33 to 42 

The Department of Physical Education offers four sequences which 
are organized to meet specialized interests of students and the require- 
ments of state and national accrediting agencies in professional educa- 
tion in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. The four majors 
within the department are: Teacher Education, Dance Education, Rec- 
reation in Physical Education, and Corrective Physical Education. 

The core curriculum for all majors in Physical Education is as fol- 
lows: Physical Education 111-112, 211-212, 241, 351, 376, 434 21 , 461-462, 
465, 449, 463, 568; total, 26 hours. 

In addition to the core curriculum, the following specific require- 
ments must be met in the major sequence chosen by the student: 

Teacher Education in Physical Education 

Physical Education 352, 359-360, 464, 469-470, 476; total, 12 hours. 
Psychology, 6 hours; Biology, 9 hours; Health, 3 hours; Education, 
6 hours; total, 24 hours. 

Dance in Education 

Physical Education 345, 346, 348, 354, 359-360, 469-470; total, 14 
hours. 

Psychology, 6 hours; Biology, 9 hours; Health, 1 hour; Education, 6 
hours; total, 22 hours. 

Recreation in Physical Education 

Physical Education 359-360, 469-470, 476, 553; total, 12 hours. 
Biology, 6 hours 22 ; Sociology, 6 hours 23 ; Health, 1 hour; total, 13 
hours. 



18 Six hours must be in History 101-102. 

"Includes Biology 101-102 for all sequences and Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104 for all 
sequences except Recreation. 

M If a student chooses to continue language offered for admission, 6 hours will ful- 
fill this requirement. 

21 No credit allowed. 

^May count in this sequence as 6 hours of natural science requirement. 

^May count in this sequence as 6 hours of social science requirement. 



74 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Corrective Physical Education 

Physical Education, 476, 557, 571; total, 7 hours. 

Biology, 12 hours; Physics, 6 hours; Health, 1 hour; total, 19 hours. 

In addition to the hours of academic credit, physical education major 
students are required to complete the following hours in physical edu- 
cation activities: 

Freshman Year — First semester: Physical Education 111 (hockey, 
soccer, swimming, gymnastics, stunts), 6 hours weekly, one-half credit. 
Second semester: Physical Education 112 (gymnastics, stunts, swim- 
ming, modern dance, softball, tennis), 6 hours weekly, one-half credit. 

Sophomore Year — First semester: Physical Education 211 (golf, 
volleyball, speedball, swimming, social dance, basketball), 6 hours 
weekly, one-half credit. Second semester: Physical Education 212 (bad- 
minton, folk dance, archery, modern dance, clog and tap dance) , 7 hours 
weekly, one-half credit. 

Junior Year — First semester: Physical Education 359 (hockey, soc- 
cer, basketball coaching and officiating, tennis, gymnastic teaching, 
inarching and apparatus), 6 hours weekly, 2 credits; Physical Educa- 
tion 351 — as laboratory hours — (child rhythms, English country dance, 
stunts). Second semester: Physical Education 360 (folk dance teach- 
ing, intramurals, marching and apparatus, modern dance, camp leader- 
ship theory, American country dance, track and field, softball coaching 
and officiating), 8 hours weekly, 2 credits. Included in the Camp Pro- 
gram in June of the junior year; volleyball coaching and officiating, 
water-front supervision, swimming methods, recreational sports, boat- 
ing and canoeing, practical camp leadership. 

Senior Year — First semester: Physical Education 469 (sports offici- 
ating and coaching, modern dance), 5 hours weekly, 1 credit. Second 
semester: Physical Education 470 (sports officiating and coaching, fes- 
tivals, bowling, squash, fencing, handball, lacrosse, golf methods), 5 
hours weekly, 1 credit. 



III. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Business Education and Secretarial Administra- 
tion offers three sequences providing variations in the junior-senior 
years which make it possible for students to prepare for various kinds 
of business and teaching positions. 

The minimum requirements for a degree are completion of 122 hours 
with 204 quality points, including the specific courses listed. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 75 

Freshman-Sophomore Requirements (for all sequences): 

Freshman Year S.H. Sophomore Year S.H. 

English 101-102 6 English 211-212 6 

History 101-102 6 Economics 211, 212 6 

Foreign Language 24 6 Economics 233-234 6 

Science 25 or Mathematics 26 .... 6 Geography 237 and 

Health 101 and Elective 25 6 History 213 2 ? 6 

Physical Education 1 Foreign Language 24 or Elective. 6 

— Business Education 211-212 .... 2 
31 Physical Education 1 

33 

Junior-Senior Requirements: 

Three sequences are offered. The courses in each of these sequences 
are divided into groups from each of which a stated number of semester 
hours must be chosen. 

A. Secretarial Sequence: Office Skills, 16 hours (including 2 hours 
in typewriting) ; Management and Accounting, 6 hours; Economics, Psy- 
chology, and Retailing, 15 hours. 

B. Business Teacher Sequence: Office Skills, 12 hours (including 2 
hours in typewriting); Management and Accounting, 9 hours; Eco- 
nomics and Retailing, 9 hours; Professional courses, 18 hours. 

C. Distributive Education (Retailing) Sequence: Retailing and re- 
lated courses, 18 hours; Economics and Sociology, 12 hours; Professional 
courses, as required by the State Department of Public Instruction. 

IV. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing will be granted upon 
the successful completion of two years of work at the Woman's College 
as outlined below, and a three-year (or equivalent) basic program taken 
at a school of nursing approved by the College. 

Freshman Year S.H. Sophomore Year S.H. 

Biology 101-102 6 English 211-212 6 

Chemistry 101-102 6 Psychology 211-212 or 221, 326. 6 

English 101-102 6 Sociology 211, 212 6 

Foreign Language 28 6 Electives 29 12 

History 101-102 6 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 — 

— Total 31 

Total 31 



M A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must con- 
tinue a foreign language offered for entrance. 

ffi A student planning to specialize in Retailing should take Chemistry 101-102 and 
Art 101. 

20 Students electing mathematics should take Mathematics 105-106. 

"Students electing History 211 may substitute History 212. 

^Since only one year of foreign language is required in college, it must be a con- 
tinuation of a foreign language offered for admission. 

29 Electives must be chosen from Grade II or above subjects except where courses at 
the Grade I level in mathematics or physics seem desirable. 



76 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts 
is the completion of 128 semester hours with 214 quality points. The 
hours required must include: 

S.H. 

English 101-102, 211-212 12 

Social Science — History 101-102; the remaining six 
hours may be in history, government, economics, 

or sociology 12 

Natural Science 6 

Foreign Language 30 (must be a continuation of lan- 
guage taken in secondary schools) 6 

Philosophy 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 2 

Major Requirements for the Following Sequences with a Major 
in Art: 

Art Education: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design— Art 
101, 224, 227, 331, 336, 377; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 
383. Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239; Art Education — Art 354; 
Psychology 221, 222; Education 350, 461, electives, 6 hours; Art or a 
related course approved by the adviser, 2 hours. 

Costume Design and Fashion Illustration: Art History — Art 103, 
325, 330, 349; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 322, 324, 327, 359; Drawing 
and Painting— Art 241, 342, 364, 383; Home Economics 301, 504; Physics 
209; Art and related courses approved by the adviser, 12 hours; Art 
450, 569. 

Design for Advertising: Art History — Art 103, 325, 357, 366, and 
one of the following: 329, 339, 350; Design— Art 101, 224, 227, 327, 379; 
Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326, 342, 351, 364, 383; Business Edu- 
cation 506; Physics 209; Art and related courses approved by the ad- 
viser, 15 hours; Art 450, 569. 

History and Interpretation of Art: Art History — Art 103, 325, 330, 
341, 349, 350, 487, elective, 6 hours; Design— Art 101, 227, 332; Draw- 
ing and Painting — Art 342. Recommended courses in other fields: His- 
tory 211, 353, 354; Languages — Greek, Latin, German, or Romance Lan- 
guages— 6 hours; Physics 209, 310; Sociology 326, 328. 

Industrial Design: Art History — Art 103, 325, 349, 357; Design — 
Art 101, 224, 227, 331, 359, 375; Drawing and Painting— Art 373; 



S0 lf a new language is begun, 12 semester hours must be completed. 



Requirements for the Degree op Bachelor op Fine Arts 77 

Ceramics and Sculpture— Art 239, 344; Physics 209; Mathematics 101- 
102 or 103-104; Business Education 506; Art and related courses ap- 
proved by the adviser, 13 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Interior Design: Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349, 357, 366; De- 
sign—Art 101, 224, 227, 332, 338, 359; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 
373, 383; Sociology 326; Art and related courses approved by the ad- 
viser, 18 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Paintings', Art History— Art 103, 325, 330, 349; Design— Art 101, 
224; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326, 328, 342, 351, 360, 364, 383, 
581; Ceramics and Sculpture — Art 239, 344; Art and related courses ap- 
proved by the adviser, 14 hours; Art 450, 569. 

Textile Design: Art History— Art 103, 325, 341, 349; Design— Art 
101, 224, 227, 359; Drawing and Painting— Art 241, 326; Home Eco- 
nomics 341, 514; Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104 and 6 hours of advanced 
chemistry courses; Physics 209; Art and related courses approved by 
the adviser, 9 hours; Art 450, 569. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

See School of Music. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

See Graduate School of the University of North Carolina, Woman's 
College Division. 



VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Class Chairmen and Academic Advisers 

There is a class chairman for each of the four classes. The Fresh- 
man Chairman gives her entire time to each freshman class. The other 
three chairmen act in an advisory capacity to members of a specified 
class for the entire three years after the freshman year. There are 
special advisers for small groups of freshmen and sophomores, and the 
heads of departments advise the juniors and seniors majoring in their 
particular departments. In this way each student has individual advice 
concerning her academic work throughout her entire college course, un- 
der the direction of members of the faculty acquainted with her needs 
and interests. 

The Academic and Personnel Committee 

Guidance of students in academic and extracurricular matters is ad- 
ministered through the Academic and Personnel Committee. This com- 
mittee is composed of the four class chairmen and five other members 
of the faculty, with the Dean of Students as chairman. The committee 
acts as a clearing agency between the faculty and students in academic 
matters. 

REGISTRATION 

Freshman Week 

To aid new students in becoming adjusted to college life as quickly 
as possible, the College has established Freshman Week. The program 
of this week includes mental and physical measurements, pre-registra- 
tion counseling, special lectures on student traditions, library tours, and 
social gatherings, in addition to the registration for courses. This pro- 
gram begins with a meeting of all new students in Aycock Auditorium 
at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, September 11. Freshman and transfer stu- 
dents — all new students except Commercial students — are required to be 
present at this and all other appointments of the program of Fresh- 
man Week. 

Registration Dates 

Freshmen and Commercial students will register Tuesday, Septem- 
ber 15. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors will consult advisers Tuesday, 
September 15. Sophomores and upperclassmen will complete registration 
Wednesday September 16. 

A fine of $1.00 a day is charged for late registration. 
78 



Academic Regulations 79 

General Regulations 

Every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must conform to the resi- 
dence requirement of this College. 

The student herself is responsible for fulfilling all requirements for 
the degree for which she is registered. 

Not later than May 1 of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years 
each student shall hand to the Registrar a copy of her program of 
study for the coming year. This program must have the official endorse- 
ment of the student's adviser and her class chairman. 

Without the permission of her class chairman no student may reg- 
ister for more than 16 hours of work in either semester except under 
the following regulations: Students may register for two half-hour les- 
sons a week in applied music (without credit) in addition to their regu- 
lar work so long as they are doing satisfactory work in all courses. 

Requests for permission to register for more than 16 hours should 
be handed to the class chairmen at the dates to be announced in the 
Carolinian. All permissions for extra work are subject to the approval 
of the College physician. 

No regular College student may carry less than 12 hours of work. 

Change op Course. Changes in course should not be made after 
registration except in unusual cases. For one week after registration 
a student may make necessary changes by presenting to the Registrar 
a change-of-course card signed by her adviser and her class chairman. 
A student is not officially dropped from a course until she has followed 
this procedure. 

Students are not permitted to enroll in a course for credit later than 
one week after registration. 

A course dropped after November 30 or after April 12 shall be 
recorded as a failure. 

Credits. No student may receive credit for any course for which she 
has not officially registered and presented to the instructor a card of 
admission from the Registrar. Students are required to register and pay 
all course fees on appointed dates. Failure to do so will result in for- 
feiture of registration and credit. 

Auditing Courses. Auditing a course is allowed under the follow- 
ing conditions: 

1. No student may audit more than one course a semester. 

2. To audit a course, a student: 

(a) must have the permission of her class chairman and the instruc- 
tor whose course is to be audited; 



80 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

(b) must register for the course as prescribed by the Registrar. 

3. A student auditing a course shall be required to meet the same at- 
tendance regulations as one taking the course for credit. 

4. An instructor may request that a student be dropped from a course 
if attendance requirements or other conditions set by him are not 
satisfactorily met. 

Classification. At the beginning of the college year the following 
minimum semester hours of credit (exclusive of required physical edu- 
cation) shall be required for the classification indicated: 

S.H. 

Seniors 84 

Juniors 50 

Sophomores 21 

On recommendation of the appropriate class chairman, the Academic 
and Personnel Committee may modify the foregoing regulations in the 
case of a meritorious student. 

Entrance Deficiencies. Graduates of approved high schools who 
present the required 15 units may be admitted to the College. To be ad- 
mitted as a candidate for a degree, the student must meet the specific 
requirements laid down for that degree. If there are deficiencies, they 
must be made good before the student may be classed as a sophomore. 

Quality Points. Every candidate for a degree must present at least 
204 quality points on the 120 required hours. If more than 120 hours 
are taken, a credit ratio of 1.7 must still be maintained. Transfer stu- 
dents entering the junior class must maintain an average of at least C, 
a credit ratio of 2. The points are computed by giving the following 
values to the grades now in use: 

A =4 quality points for each hour of credit. 
B = S quality points for each hour of credit. 
C=2 quality points for each hour of credit. 
D = l quality point for each hour of credit. 

Residence Requirements. Not fewer than 42 of the last 60 semester 
hours required for any Bachelor's degree shall be done at the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina. Of these 42 semester hours, 
at least 30 shall be done in the regular sessions of the College from Sep- 
tember to June. In general, 12 of these hours shall be devoted to sub- 
jects in the department of the student's major interest. 

Students who have successfully completed three years of work in a 
standard college and whose credits have been accepted by the College 
are required to do 30 rather than 42 hours in residence. 



Academic Regulations 81 

Summer Session, Correspondence, and Extension Credits. Stu- 
dents desiring to apply toward their degrees work taken at the summer 
sessions of other colleges must confer with the Registrar of this College 
for permission to take such courses. No credit is assured unless a course 
has been so approved. 

Summer session students (other than those who have matriculated 
during the regular year of the College) planning to apply their sum- 
mer session work toward a degree must file a record of their entrance 
credits with the Registrar of the College previous to matriculation. In 
general, students who wish to apply summer session work toward a 
degree shall fulfill the prerequisites laid down in the regular catalogue. 
A maximum of seven credits earned in one six-weeks' session, or four- 
teen credits earned in two six-weeks' sessions, may be counted toward 
a degree. 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work taken 
while a student is registered for work at this College. 

To have extension work credited, the student must have attained 
junior standing and have a cumulative average of C. 

Not more than one-fourth of the requirement for a degree may be 
done by extension work, and not more than 8 semester hours of exten- 
sion work may be done in any one year. Required freshman and sopho- 
more work may not be done by extension. 

Examinations. Every student is required to take an examination, 
if one is given, on every course for which she is registered. No exami- 
nations may be given except during the three regular examination 
periods of the year: Steptember 15 and at the end of each semester. 
Examinations for the removal of conditions and for proficiency ex- 
aminations will be held on September 15. 

Blanks on which to apply for September re-examinations are sent 
from the Registrar's office in July. In January and May the students 
must file requests for re-examinations to be given at the close of the 
first and second semesters, respectively. 

Requests for re-examinations must be filed with the Registrar's office 
not later than the following times: 

September 1, for re-examinations to be taken on September 15. 

January 12, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the first 
semester. 

May 9, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the second 
semester. 



82 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

An E may be removed by re-examination before the beginning of the 
corresponding semester of the next year in which the student is in 
residence. If not removed, an E automatically becomes an F. Unless 
otherwise stated by the instructor, an E received in the first half of a 
year course may be removed by obtaining a grade of C or better in the 
last half of the course. Students receiving a grade of F must repeat 
the course in order to receive credit. 

The work for which an I has been given must be completed before 
the beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year in which 
the student is in residence; otherwise, the 7 automatically becomes an F. 

Proficiency Examinations. Full credit will be given for passing a 
proficiency examination in any course listed in the catalogue. Not more 
than 12 hours earned by proficiency examinations shall be credited to- 
ward graduation. A grade of D is passing but quality points will be 
given only for a grade of C or better. 

Proficiency examinations will be given during the three regular ex- 
amination periods. 

Written requests for proficiency examinations should be mailed to 
the Registrar at least two weeks prior to examination week. 

Report. A report of the students' work is mailed to the parent or 
guardian at the end of each semester. A report is also sent to each stu- 
dent at the end of the first semester. The reports are based upon the 
following system of marking: 

A — Excellent. 

B— Good. 

C — Average. 

D — Lowest passing mark. 

E — Conditioned. 

F — Failure. 

I — Incomplete. 

Students must attain a grade of at least D to pass in any course. 
Grade E indicates that the student is conditioned but will be given an- 
other opportunity to remove the deficiency. An F may be removed only 
by repeating the course. 

Attendance. First-semester freshmen and commercial students and 
all other students with lower than a C average are permitted one un- 
excused absence in each course during a semester. Excues for absences 
caused by illness must be secured from the College physician, as ex- 
plained on page 

Detailed information about regulations governing absences is given 
in the Handbook of the Student Government Association. 



Academic Regulations 83 

Town students ill at their homes should communicate with the Col- 
lege physician before returning to the campus, and should report at the 
Infirmary within 72 hours after their return, bringing a certificate 
of professional attendance signed by their home physician. 

Withdrawal From the College. Formal withdrawal from the Col- 
lege is arranged through the office of the Registrar and must then be 
approved by the Dean of Students. Such withdrawal becomes effective 
only when the completed application is filed in the office of the Registrar. 

Dean's List. Two groups of students are eligible for the Dean's 
List. In September, seniors who have been in residence the preceding 
semester are eligible. In January, seniors and juniors who have been 
in residence the preceding semester are eligible. Eligible students are 
placed upon the Dean's List if they have made at least a B average 
and if they have received no grade lower than C for the immediately 
preceding semester, provided they are not otherwise disqualified. For 
further special conditions, exceptions, and responsibilities see the Stu- 
dents' Handbook. 

Graduation With Honors. Honors are awarded to seniors at com- 
mencement. For summa cum laude a minimum average of 3.90 is re- 
quired; for magna cum laude, 3.60; for cum laude, 3.30. Averages are 
computed on the basis of those courses which have been taken for credit 
and which have been completed by the end of the first semester of the 
senior year. Any senior is eligible for honors who at the end of the 
first semester has completed at least 45 hours of work (not including 
hours for which credit has been received by proficiency examinations) 
in residence at the Woman's College and who has received not more 
than three semester hours of F in courses of Grade I and II. 

Exclusion from College. During the first semester that a student 
is enrolled, she must pass at least 6 hours of work to remain in college. 
Every semester after the first, a student must pass at least 9 hours 
to remain in college or to be readmitted. This regulation may be waived 
at the discretion of the Academic and Personnel Committee. This regula- 
tion does not take into account proposed summer school work. 

Transcript of Record. Only one complete transcript for each stu- 
dent registered will be furnished without charge. Except in the case of 
seniors applying for teaching certificates in North Carolina, one such 
transcript is furnished free. Additional copies will be made only on 
receipt of a fee of one dollar ($1.00), or 50 cents for a single summer 
session record, to cover clerical expenses involved. 



VII. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

First semester courses are usually given odd numbers. 

Second semester courses are usually given even numbers. 

An r after a course number indicates that the course may be given 
either semester. 

An s before a course number indicates that the course is given only 
during the summer. 

A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to an 
hour class period per week through one semester. 

A year course, indicated by hyphenated numbers, must be completed 
before credit will be allowed. 

A comma between course numbers indicates that independent credit 
is granted for the work of one semester. 

Courses of Grade I are numbered 100-199 and are primarily for 
freshmen and sophomores; those of Grade II, 200-299, primarily for 
sophomores; those of Grade III, 300-399, primarily for juniors and 
seniors. Grade IV, 400-499, indicates courses open only to seniors. Grade 
V, 500-599, includes courses open to advanced undergraduates and grad- 
uate students. 

For necessary adjustments in grading, see page 70. 

It is a requirement of the University that department heads obtain 
the special approval of the Chancellor to offer regularly scheduled under- 
graduate classes for which fewer than ten students enroll or graduate 
classes for which fewer than five students enroll. 

If enrollment does not justify continuation of a class, it may be 
withdrawn. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Ivy (Head of the Department) ; Associate Pro- 
fessors Thrush, Opper; Lecturer Davis; Assistant Professors 
Jastrow, Hardin, Williams, Barksdale; Instructor Barch- 
enger; Graduate Assistant Click. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

DESIGN 
101r. Design 

Basic course in the fundamentals of design from the following ap- 
proaches: art structure, free expression, functional, geometric, and ab- 
stract. Through many problems in various media, creative ability as 
well as intelligent choice and judgment in the use of art will have op- 
portunity for development. Required of art majors. One lecture and 
six studio hours. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.50. Staff. 

84 



Department op Art 85 

224. Color 

A continuation of Art 101 with emphasis on color. A study of color 
theories and the decorative and structural use of color in creative prob- 
lems. Required of all art majors. Prerequisite, Art 101. One lecture 
and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy, Miss Hardin. 

227. Lettering 

A study is made of the historical background, fundamental princi- 
ples, and the essentials of good lettering. Application of this study 
through suitable lettering problems develops skill and creative ability. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

322. Costume Design and Fashion Illustration 

A basic study of creative design in costume, and an introduction to 
various media used in commercial fashion illustration. Prerequisites, 
Art 101, 22k, 24-1. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barksdale. 

323. Interior Design 

Creative work in interior design based on the controlling factors of 
function, the inherent qualities of material, and contemporary ways of 
construction. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241* One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$1.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

324. Costume Design and Illustration 

A continuation of 322 with emphasis on perfecting techniques and 
original composition; a broadening of the field to include all forms of 
dress — sports, evening, business, etc. (for men, women, and children) — 
also costuming for the theatre. Problems in both two-dimensional de- 
sign (illustration on paper) and three-dimensional design (draping 
model or manikin.) Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241, 364, 322. One 
lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barksdale. 

327. Design for Advertising and Display 

A course for students interested in advertising art. Creative work 
in commercial advertising and window display. Prerequisites, Art 101, 
103, 224> One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 

331. Industrial Design 

Problems using a variety of materials executed with emphasis on 
design and suitability for mass production. Furniture design and con- 
struction, metal work, weaving, and related processes are studied. Pre- 
requisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241. One lecture and six studio hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00 Miss Hardin. 



86 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

332. Architectural Design 

Creative work in architectural design based on the controlling factors 
of design, function, the inherent qualities of material, and the structural 
principles of architecture. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224., 24.1. One 
lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

336r. Introduction to Crafts 

Problems using a variety of materials including wood, clay, metal, 
and various textile processes are executed. Prerequisite, junior standing. 
Four studio hours. Credit, two semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss 
Hardin. 

338. Perspective and Architectural Rendering 

Problems involving the use of various media and instruments are 
used to develop skill and knowledge necessary for making pictorial rep- 
resentations and perspective renderings of exterior and interior archi- 
tectural designs. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 241, 373. One lecture and 
six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

359. Textile Design 

A study to acquaint the student with techniques in which new ma- 
terials and textures are important. Emphasis on structural design in 
weaving, with some attention to design as in silk-screen printing and 
block printing. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224- One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Miss Hardin. 

361. Printing Textiles 

A course of advanced practice and execution of original designs for 
printed textiles, layout suitable for design studio and converter use, 
and practice in the art and technology of block and screen printing. 
Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241, 331, 359. One lecture and six studio 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. 
Miss Hardin. 

362. Weaving of Textiles 

A study and practical application of the materials and techniques 
of weaving, with special attention given to the fundamental elements 
of design as related to woven fabrics. Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241, 
331, 359. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Miss Hardin. 

375. Industrial Design 

A continuation of Art 331, with greater emphasis being given to the 
technical problems involved. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 24.1, 331. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Miss Hardin. 



Department of Art 87 

377. Design for the Theatre 

Problems, materials, and techniques related to design for the theatre. 
Elevations and model sets for various types and period productions will 
be planned and executed. Prerequisite, Art 101. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. 

379. The Art of the Book 

A course for students interested in book illustrations. Creative prob- 
lems in layout and illustration are included. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 
22b, 2U1> One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

The purpose of this course is to co-ordinate the previous course work 
of the student in the field of art and to present a general survey of the 
field. Prerequisite, senior standing. Two lecture hours and two studio 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ivy. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DRAWING AND PAINTING 

241. Drawing 

Fundamental principles of drawing and composition. Experimental 
studies in the studio and out-of-doors, using various media. Required of 
all art majors. One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

326. Wood and Linoleum Block Printing 

A study through creative problems of the techniques of wood cutting 
and wood engraving. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22b, 2bl. One lecture 
and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

328. Etching 

A study through creative problems of the processes of etching, dry- 
point, aquatint, and soft ground etching. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 
22b, 2bl. One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

342. Painting 

A continuation of Art 241 with attention to problems in color. Op- 
portunity for experimental studies in the technique of oil painting. Pre- 
requisites, Art 101, 103, 22b, 2bl. One lecture and six studio hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Thrush, Mr. Opper. 



88 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

351. Lithography 

A continued study of composition in black and white, using the litho- 
graph stone as a medium of expression. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 241. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Opper. 

360. Painting 

Experimental problems in form, volume, space, and light expressed 
in color. Still life and landscape subjects are executed in both water 
color and oil. Prerequisites, Art 101, 241, 342. One lecture and six studio 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Miss Barksdale. 

364. Figure Drawing and Painting 

The first half of this course is devoted to figure construction in black 
and white, and the second half is devoted to problems in color. Prerequi- 
sites, Art 101, 241, 842. One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Barksdale. 

373. Mechanical Drawing 

Designed to equip the student to produce and read working draw- 
ings and plans such as may be used in industry and by interior de- 
signers. The theory of projection, the use of scales, and the technique 
of projectioning. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 241. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

383. Painting 

Practical experience with the various techniques of water-color paint- 
ing; transparent, gouache, egg tempera, and other closely related media. 
Prerequisites, Art 101, 224, 241. One lecture and six studio hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Opper. 

HISTORY AND INTERPRETATION OP ART 

103r. Introduction to Art 

The nature and materials of art, and the relation of art to man and 
his physical and cultural environment. The chief purpose of this course 
is to establish a basis for intelligent appreciation. Required of all art 
majors. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. 
Miss Jastrow. 

325. Modern Art 

The origin and development of the important art movements and 
theories beginning with the nineteenth century and continuing through 
the present time. The work of the leaders in various movements will 
be studied. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Mr. Ivy. 



Department of Art 89 

329. Primitive Art 

Outstanding examples of the arts of prehistoric and primitive cul- 
tures of various continents will be studied. Prerequisite, junior stand- 
ing. One lecture, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Studio 
fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

330. Ancient Art 

Art of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and pre-Hellenic art of the 
Mediterranean. Greek and Roman art, with emphasis on the cultural 
background as well as the structural principles of Greek art and their 
amalgamation with the Roman spirit, which underlie European arts 
of later periods. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00, Miss 
Jastrow. 

334. Arts of East Asia 

The development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts 
in India, China, and Japan from antiquity through the nineteenth cen- 
tury will be studied. Attention will be given to the social, economic, 
and religious background and to the relations with Western art. Pre- 
requisite, junior or senior standing. Three lecture hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

339. Early Arts of the Americas 

An introduction to pre-Columbian and Spanish colonial arts. Monu- 
ments of the Mayan and other past civilizations and the early period 
of Latin American countries. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. 
One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Studio fee, $1.00. 
Miss Jastrow. 

341. Arts of the Middle Ages 

Early Christian and Byzantine art, with emphasis on the background 
of ancient art and culture. Romanesque and gothic art as expression of 
the cultural and religious development of the Middle Ages, with empha- 
sis on the formative artistic principles. Prerequisite, junior or senior 
standing. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

349. Arts of the Renaissance 

Development of the arts within the cultural background of the Ren- 
aissance, with emphasis on the works of the outstanding artists and 
their contributions to later periods. Architecture, sculpture, painting, 
and minor arts. Elective open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores 
on permission of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 



90 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

350. Western European Arts of the Renaissance 

Introduction to the development of the arts in Western Europe since 
the late Gothic period and under the influence of the Italian Renais- 
sance. Prerequisite, junior or senior standing. One hour, second semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

353. Arts of the United States 

The development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts 
in the United States will be studied. The influence of European art and 
of the American environment will be given consideration. Prerequisite, 
junior or senior standing. Three lecture hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

(Not offered in 1952-1953.) 

357. History of Architecture 

A study of the architectural forms and the chief historic styles, with 
emphasis on the relation of architecture to the civilization which pro- 
duced it. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

366. History of Furniture 

Period styles of furniture and interior design and the relation of 
these to the life of the time. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Mr. Barchenger. 

487. Introduction to Museum Work 

A study will be made of the function of a museum in life today. 
Seminar and laboratory problems will emphasize the fundamentals of 
current procedures in the selection, preservation, and presentation of 
art work. Prerequisites, senior standing and the permission of the head 
of the department. Two lecture or seminar and two laboratory hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Jastrow. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

CERAMICS AND SCULPTURE 

239. Modeling 

A general course in the preparation of clay, designing and modeling 
animal and figure compositions in relief and in the round, ceramic 
sculpture, and the surfacing of clay work. One lecture and six studio 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 
Mrs. Davis. 

340. Pottery 

A study of the design and the processes of pottery making: primi- 
tive coil method, use of potter's wheel, two- and three-piece mold cast- 



Department op Art 91 

ings, preparation, application, and fusing of glazes. Prerequisites, Art 
101, 108, 239. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Mrs. Davis. 

344. Sculpture 

A creative study of the sculptural and plastic problems encountered 
in various sculptural media — terra cotta, stone, wood, plaster — and the 
relationship of sculpture to architecture through creative problems; the 
making of piece molds and casting in clay. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 
239. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Mrs. Davis. 



ART EDUCATION 

333. Art Education in the Elementary School 

A study of the aims and the philosophy of art education in the ele- 
mentary school and of the art curricula of public schools. Opportunity 
for observation of the elementary school art program in progress will 
be arranged. Prerequisite, Art 101. Two lecture and two studio hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams. 

354. Art Education in the Secondary School 

The aims of art in the public school, the curricula of the creative 
program in schools for kindergarten through high school, and the selec- 
tion, preparation, and use of teaching materials. Observation and criti- 
cism of children's creative work, combined with the planning of a 
course of study for a typical public school. Prerequisite, eighteen semes- 
ter hours of art. Two lecture and two studio hours, first semester. Credit 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Opper. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

569r. Studio Problems 

Special problems adjusted to the needs and interests of the individual 
students. Prerequisite, senior or graduate standing. Three conference 
hours. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00 to $5.00. Staff. 

581. Painting 

A study of the problems encountered in landscape painting. Theories, 
methods, and techniques characteristic of recent trends in painting are 
studied. Prerequisite, senior or graduate standing. One lecture and 
eight studio hours, first semester. Credit, four semester hours. Studio 
fee, $3.00. Mr. Ivy. 



92 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

A graduate major in Painting and Graphic Arts is offered within the 
Department of Art as a part of the degree program leading to the Mas- 
ter of Fine Arts. Graduate courses sufficient to constitute a minor in 
Painting and Graphic Arts or Art History are also available. 

In addition to the regulations governing the Creative Arts Program 
and graduate work in general at the Woman's College found on page 
217, it is desirable that the student electing a major program in Paint- 
ing and Graphic Arts should have 54 semester hours or the equivalent 
in undergraduate credits in art with a distribution of courses showing 
15 semester hours in art history, 6 semester hours in design, 18 semester 
hours in drawing and painting and 15 semester hours in art electives. 

The culmination of the program will be an exhibition showing the 
creative power and technical ability of the student and a paper inter- 
preting or outlining the nature of original contribution or dealing with 
sources, historical influences, or compositional problems. 

Additional information may be had from the Office of the Associate 
Dean of the Graduate School or the head of the department. 

521. Serigraphy 

Research of an historical and technical nature is combined with 
creative problems emphasizing the use of color in silk screen printing. 
Prerequisite, graduate standing. One lecture and six studio hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Hardin. 

526. Woodblock Printing and Engraving 

A study through creative problems of the techniques and technical 
processes involved in wood cutting, wood engraving, and printing. At- 
tention will be given to the use of black and white and color. Research 
of an historical and technical nature required. Prerequisite, graduate 
standing. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 

528. Etching 

A study through creative problems of the use of the etching process 
as an art medium. Research of an historical and technical nature re- 
quired. Prerequisite, graduate standing. One lecture and six studio 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Miss Thrush. 

542. Drawing and Painting 

Creative work emphasizing the use of landscape, still-life, etc., as 
subject matter and oil and watercolor as media. Research of an his- 
torical and technical nature required. Prerequisite, graduate standing. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy. 



Department op Art 93 

551. Lithography 

A study through creative problems in (a) black and white, (b) color, 
the use of the lithograph stone as an art medium. Research of an his- 
torical and technical nature required. Prerequisite, graduate standing. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Opper. 

560. Drawing and Painting 

Creative work in mural painting with research of an historical and 
technical nature required. Prerequisite, graduate standing. One lecture 
and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $3.00. 

564. Drawing and Painting 

Creative work emphasizing the use of the human figure as subject 
matter and oil as a medium. Research of an historical and technical 
nature required. Prerequisite, graduate standing. One lecture and six 
studio hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. 

587, 588. Painting Research Seminar 

Research and study on selected painting problems involving work of 
an historical and technical nature. Prerequisite, graduate standing. 
Credit, three or six semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy, Mr. 
Opper. 

591-592-593. Thesis 

Credit, six semester hours. 

Minor program may be selected from this group: 

534. Painting in East Asia 

A study of the development of painting in East Asia from antiquity 
through the nineteenth century. Prerequisite, graduate standing. Three 
lecture hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

549. Italian Renaissance Painting 

The development of painting in Italy from 1300 to 1600 is studied 
with emphasis given to the work of the outstanding painters. Prerequi- 
site, graduate standing. Three lecture hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 

550. Northern Renaissance Painting 

The development of painting in the northern European countries 
from 1350 to 1700 with emphasis given to the work of the outstanding 
painters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. Three lecture hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Jastrow. 



94 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

561, 562. Modern Painting 

Important art movements and theories will be studied in consider- 
able detail; impressionism, post-impressionism, cubism, surrealism, etc. 
The work of the leaders of the movements will be emphasized; Monet, 
Cezanne, Braque, Picasso, etc. Prerequisite, graduate standing. Three 
lecture hours. Credit, three or six semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. 
Mr. Ivy. 

590r. Experimentation and Analysis — Painting and the Graphic Arts 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of painting as 
a creative activity. The title defines the method of approach. Not open 
to painting majors. Prerequisite, graduate standing. One lecture and 
six studio hours. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 

Tools of Research and Composition — Painting 

See Philosophy 590 — Aesthetics. Required of all graduate majors in 
painting. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Ashby. 

Note; The graduate course in Philosophy of Education (Education 640) 
may be taken as a part of the minor in painting. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professors Cutter (Head of the Department) , Ingraham, 
Shaftesbury; Associate Professors Coldwell, Williams, 
Love, Thiel; Assistant Professors Gangstad, Harpster, 
Dawley, Rogers; Instructors Frost, Laffin; Assistants 
Wooten, Clark, Bolinger. 

biology 

1101-102. General Biology 

A study of selected types of plants and animals, designed to acquaint 
the student with the structure, activities, and life relations of organ- 
isms. Biological principles are stressed. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00 each semester. Miss Coldwell, Mr. Shaftesbury, Miss Ingraham, 
Mr. Cutter, Mr. Thiel, Miss Gangstad, Miss Harpster, Miss Dawley, 
Mrs. Frost, Miss Clark, Miss Bolinger. 

449. Co-ordinating Course: Great Problems in Biology 

A review of the principles of biology organized in terms of current 
problems in the biological sciences. The student will be expected to 



'Specially qualified students may enter General Botany 221 or Plant Morphology 222 
or General Zoology 241-342 upon presentation of their high-school biology note book, if 
accepted after an interview with the head of the Department of Biology. 



Department op Biology 95 

make individual contributions to the course in the form of independent 
readings, bibliographic work, and simple laboratory experiments. Re- 
quired by the department of all senior biology majors. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Cutter. 

492. Heredity and Eugenics 

The history and significance of the theory of organic evolution; 
Mendelism, with modern trends in genetics; contributions of genetics to 
the improvement of mankind. Lectures, reading in text and reference 
books, with written reports. Prerequisites, nine hours of biological 
science. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Cutter. 

499r. Biological Problems 

Individual studies in botany, zoology, or other fields. The laboratory 
work and reading of the student will be guided by a weekly conference 
with the instructor in charge. A written report will be required. Lab- 
oratory work and conferences are arranged. Credit, three or more semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 a credit hour. Staff. 

BOTANY 

2121r. Ornamental Plants 

Garden plants, their identification and ornamental value in land- 
scaping and interior decorations, their cultural requirements, methods 
of propagation, and the means of protecting them against insect and 
fungus pests. Designed primarily as a freshman elective. Three one- 
hour lectures or demonstrations per week. Credit, three semester hours. 
Fee for demonstration material, $1.00. Miss Gangstad. 

221. General Botany 

A survey of the life of seed plants with special emphasis on the 
relations between structure and function. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 
or the equivalent. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. 
Thiel, Mr. Rogers. 

222. Plant Morphology 

A study of the structure, life history, reproduction, and relation- 
ships of selected types from the thallophytes to the spermatophytes. 
Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 or the equivalent. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel, Mr. Rogers. 

324. Local Flora 

Methods and principles of plant classification. The identification of 
flowering plants. Field trips. Prerequisites, Biology 101-102 and three 



This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



96 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

additional semester hours in biological sciences. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Rogers. 

325r. Histology and Anatomy 

The technique of preparing plant material for anatomical studies; 
methods of killing, imbedding, sectioning, and staining. The tissues are 
studied as to origin, differentiation, and organization. Prerequisite, 
Biology 221. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. 

327. Plant Ecology 

An elementary study of plants in their natural habitats and in rela- 
tion to the factors of environment such as soil, water, heat, light, and 
animals. Major emphasis is placed upon the laws of plant distribution 
and the factors involved in plant associations. Prerequisites, Biology 
101-102 and three additional semester hours in biological sciences. Two 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Rogers. 

330. Diseases of Plants 

A study of the diseases of plants, their causal organisms, distribu- 
tion, and methods of prevention and control. Prerequisite, Biology 221 
or 222. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. ThieL 

ZOOLOGY 

241-342. General Zoology 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, ecology, distribution, 
and economic importance of animals, and of the general principles of 
animal biology. The laboratory work includes dissection of animals rep- 
resenting each of the principal groups. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 
or the equivalent. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semester. 
Mr. Shaftesbury, Miss Harpster. 

247. Economic Ornithology 

Laboratory work and lectures on the classification, distribution, food 
relations, and conservation of birds. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 or 
the equivalent, and approval of the instructor. First semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

248. General Ornithology 

Chiefly field work on the identification and seasonal distribution of 
our native birds. Each student must be provided with opera glass or 
low-power field glass. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102 or the equivalent. 
Second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. 



Department of Biology 97 

345. Animal Ecology 

A study of the relations of animals to the conditions in which they 
live, with special emphasis upon adaptations and conservation. The 
field work includes a general survey of the ponds and streams of the 
Greensboro region. Prerequisites, Biology 101-102 and three additional 
semester hours in biological sciences. Two lecture hours and three lab- 
oratory hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

351. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates 

A study of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the vertebrates, 
with dissection of a series of types. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. Two 
lecture hours and six laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, four 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

s353. Invertebrate Marine Zoology 

Offered for six weeks during the summer under the natural condi- 
tions of environment at the Carolina Marine Laboratory of Woman's 
College at Beaufort, North Carolina. For advanced college students, 
high-school teachers, and others interested in professional biology. Lec- 
tures, laboratory and field study, and assigned readings. Chiefly on 
marine invertebrates, together with an introduction to the study of the 
vertebrates. Prerequisite, at least two years of college biology or ex- 
tended teaching experience in biology. Credit, six semester hours. Since 
the enrollment is limited, application should be made before April 1 to 
A. D. Shaftesbury, Director, Carolina Marine Laboratory, Woman's Col- 
lege of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

354. Vertebrate Embryology 

A comparative study of embryos of frog, chick, and mammal. Obser- 
vation of living material, practical histological technique, the study of 
serial sections, and dissection of the larger embryos and foetal mem- 
branes. Prerequisite, nine hours in biological sciences. Two lecture 
hours and six laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, four semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

356. Parasitology 

An introductory study of the biology, life histories, distribution, and 
control of animal parasites, with special reference to those producing 
diseases of man and domestic animals. Prerequisites, Biology 2U1 and 
$h2 or Biology 381. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Mr. Shaftesbury. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

271. Mammalian Anatomy 

Human anatomy studied by means of skeletons, anatomical prepara- 
tions, models, and a manikin. The cat is dissected. Prerequisite, Biology 



98 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

101-102. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Miss Dawley, Mr. 
Laffin. 

277r. Physiology of the Human Body 

A brief consideration of the structure and functions of each system 
of the human body. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. Two lecture hours 
and three laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Mr. Laffin. 

372. Histology and Organology 

A study of the microscopic structure of the principal tissues and 
organs of the animal body, with practical work in histological technique. 
Prerequisite, Biology 271 or the equivalent. One lecture hour and six 
laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Miss Harpster, Mr. Laffin. 

373. Physiology of the Neuromuscular System, Respiration, 
and Circulation 

A detailed study of muscle, nerve, blood, circulation, and respiration. 
Prerequisites, nine hours in biological sciences and Chemistry 101-102 
or 103-10 U- Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Mr. 
Laffin. 

374. Physiology of Digestion, Metabolism, Excretion, and Reproduction 

A study of the physiology of digestion, metabolic changes, excretion, 
and endocrine glands. Prerequisite, Biology 373 or the equivalent. Two 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Mr. Laffin. 

378. Physiology of Activity 

A study of mechanisms involved in adjustments of the body to 
physical activity. Prerequisites, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-10 U and 
Biology 271 and 277. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams, Mr. Laffin. 



BACTERIOLOGY 

381r. General Bacteriology 

A survey of the fundamentals of bacteriology. Laboratory technique 
is emphasized. Prerequisite, Biology 101-102; prerequisite or parallel, 
Chemistry 101-102 or 103-lOk. One lecture hour and six laboratory 
hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love, 
Miss Wooten. 



Department of Biology 99 

382. Pathogenic Bacteriology 

The relation of bacteria to disease in man. Clinical and diagnostic 
methods; isolation and identification of pathogenic micro-organisms. 
Prerequisite, Biology 381. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

383. Laboratory Methods in Clinical Diagnosis 

Examination of blood, spinal fluid, and other body fluids. Designed 
for medical laboratory technicians. Prerequisite, Biology 382. One lec- 
ture hour and six laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

384. Immunology 

A study of the reaction of the body against infection, with demon- 
strations of antibody formation, and diagnostic serological reactions. 
Prerequisite, Biology 383. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Miss Love, Miss Wooten. 

NATURAL HISTORY 

3 333r. Natural Science 

A general course intended to cultivate an interest in and under- 
standing of one's natural environment. A number of the laboratory 
periods will be used for field study. Two lecture hours and three lab- 
oratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Rogers. 



^his course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



100 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION AND 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Littlejohn (Head of the Department) ; Asso- 
ciate Professors Spruill, 1 Wellman; Assistant Professors 
Adams, Hardaway, Whitlock; Instructors Smith, Sarah 
W. Jones; Visiting Lecturer May Belle Jones; Assistant 
Orrell; Graduate Assistant Orange. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Secretarial Administration integrates a broad general education with 
special education for students who are planning to enter business or 
business teaching. Three areas of concentration are provided: (1) a sec- 
retarial sequence, leading to secretarial and related positions; (2) a 
business teacher sequence, leading to clerical, stenographic, and basic 
business teaching positions in secondary schools and junior colleges; 
and (3) a distributive education (retailing) sequence, leading to store 
service positions and distributive education positions in secondary 
schools. The business teacher sequence and the distributive education 
(retailing) sequence include courses required for a Grade A teaching 
certificate, valid in the high schools of North Carolina. 

The requirements in the freshman and sophomore years correspond 
to those of a liberal-arts curriculum. Certain basic courses in economics 
which provide a fundamental understanding of the operation of busi- 
ness and of economic organization are required as a foundation for the 
more specialized courses offered in this department. 

For the requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Secretarial Administration, see page 74. 

Graduate work leading to the degree of Master of Scienee and Master 
of Education with a major in business education is offered through 
courses in both the regular sessions and the summer sessions at the 
Woman's College Center of the Graduate School of the University of 
North Carolina. 

See also Graduate School. 

OFFICE SKILLS 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

211-212. Elementary Typewriting 

Development of basic typewriting skills and their application to the 
production of letters, tabulations, and manuscripts. Students other than 
majors may take 211 for one credit without taking 212. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semes- 
ter. Miss Wellman, Mrs. Smith, Miss Orrell, Miss Jones. 



*0n leave of absence. 1952-1953. 



Department op Business Education 101 

311-312. Advanced Typewriting 

Development of sustained production on various kinds of typewriting 
problems. Major emphasis on typewriting problems commonly met in 
business offices and measured by office standards. Prerequisite, courses 
211-212 or the approved equivalent. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semester. Miss Orrell, 
Miss Jones. 

321-322-423. Shorthand 

Development of reading and writing skills in Gregg shorthand and 
ability to take dictation and transcribe it. A minimum amount of di- 
rected work experience required during the third semester or during 
the summer preceding the third semester. (See courses 428 and 550.) 
Prerequisite, courses 211-212 or the approved equivalent. Daily for three 
semesters. Credit, nine semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each, 321 
and 322; $2.00, 423. Miss Spruill, Miss Wellman, Miss Whitlock, Miss 
Orrell, Mr. Orange. 

331r. Duplicating Machines 

Development of skills in the use of gelatin, fluid process, and stencil 
duplicators. Prerequisite, courses 211-212 or the approved equivalent. 
Six laboratory hours for one-half semester. Credit, one semester hour. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Adams. 

332r. Transcribing Machines 

Development of a marketable skill in the use of transcribing ma- 
chines. Prerequisite, courses 211-212 or the approved equivalent. Re- 
quirement: satisfactory completion of prescribed course evidenced by a 
certificate of proficiency on Ediphone, Dictaphone, or Sound Scriber. Six 
laboratory hours for one-half semester. Credit, one semester hour. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. Miss Adams. 

341r. Secretarial Forms and Usage 

Training and practice in the correct use of business terms and vocab- 
ulary in order to develop proficiency and skill in the effective use of 
English for business purposes. Primarily for juniors. Two hours. Credit, 
two semester hours. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

351r. Filing 

Study of various systems of filing, both visible and vertical. Certifi- 
cate of American Filing Institute awarded on satisfactory completion 
of the course. Two laboratory hours. Credit, one semester hour. Lab- 
oratory fee, 50 cents. Miss Spruill. 



102 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

428. Advanced Dictation and Transcription 

Further development of dictation and transcription skill with em- 
phasis on "mailable" transcripts. A minimum amount of secretarial ex- 
perience required if not completed in courses 423 or 550. Prerequisite, 
courses 321-322-423 or the approved equivalent. Daily, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill, Miss 
Wellman, Miss Whitlock. 

430. Specialized Dictation and Reporting 

Court, convention, and conference reporting. Attention to specialized 
secretarial work in such fields as civil service, insurance, medicine, law, 
textile industry, aviation, and engineering. Undergraduates may not 
take this course for credit if they have 12 hours of credit in shorthand. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill. 

s431. Office Machines 

Development of a fair degree of skill in the use of office machines 
and equipment: gelatin, stencil, and fluid process duplicators; adding, 
calculating, and posting machines ; dictating and transcription machines ; 
and the Vari-Typer. Four laboratory hours, daily. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Adams. 

433r. Circulating Machines 

Development of a marketable skill in the use of adding, calculating, 
and posting machines. Six laboratory hours. Credit, two semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Adams. 

550. Directed Business Practice 

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Mathematics 3J+1. Statistical Methods I. 

314r. Business Data 

Uses, sources, and correct interpretation of numerical data in busi- 
ness and economics. Practice to develop proficiency in the techniques of 
collecting, compiling, analyzing, and interpreting elementary statistical 
material, with emphasis on ratios, index numbers. Two hours. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Hardaway. 

338. Institution Accounting 

The fundamental principles and techniques of accounting applied to 
a tea room, a school cafeteria, the nutrition department of a hospital, 
a college residence hall, a city club, and similar organizations. Two lab- 
oratory hours and two recitation hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. 



Department of Business Education 103 

courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates 

501. Advanced Accounting 

Rapid review of the accounting processes, with particular emphasis 
on adjustments, working papers, financial statements, and closing and 
reversing entries. An intensive study of accounting statements and the 
items that comprise them, with major attention to procedures involved 
in evaluating, reporting, and interpreting accounting statement items. 
Prerequisite, Economics 233-234- or the equivalent. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Littlejohn. 

502. Advanced Accounting 

Some of the technical accounting procedures arising out of such 
specialized business situations as are encountered in income tax, part- 
nership, consignment, agencies and branch offices, installment sales, and 
mergers and consolidations. Prerequisite, course 501 or the equivalent. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Littlejohn. 

504r. Office Management 

Principles, materials, and techniques of office procedures and man- 
agement. Two hours. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Wellman, Miss 
Jones. 

509r. Business Correspondence 

Introduction to current practices in business correspondence and com- 
position of business letters. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Whitlock. 



RETAILING 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

314. Business Data 

Art 101. Design. 

Art 224. Color. 

Art 327. Design for Advertising and Display. 

Home Economics 341. Textiles. 

Psychology 232. Applied Psychology. 

Psychology 335. Personnel Psychology. 

Psychology 340. Measurement in Personnel Work. 



104 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

courses for advanced undergraduates and graduates 

506r. Introduction to Retailing 

Fundamental principles of retail store organization; management, 
merchandising, publicity, and control. Basic course for students planning 
to enter retailing as a career. Students preparing to teach business sub- 
jects in the secondary schools should find this course valuable. Elective 
for juniors and seniors. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Jones. 

507. Merchandise Information 

Intensive study of selected items of non-textile merchandise. The 
preparation of a merchandise manual by each member of the class. Pre- 
requisites, course 506 and consent of the instructor. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mrs. 
Jones. 

508. Problems in Retailing 

Critical examination and analysis of the problems in retail store 
operation. Classroom work correlated with specific store situations. 
Prerequisites, course 506 and consent of instructor. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Jones. 

550r. Directed Business Practice. See below. 

Economics 530. Principles of Marketing. 

WORK EXPERIENCE 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

550r. Directed Business Practice 

Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. A paper 
or project and a rating by the employer required. This course meets 
the work experience requirement in courses 423 and 428, and partially 
fulfills the state requirements for certification as retail-selling co-ordi- 
nator. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Time to be arranged. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Whitlock, Mrs. Jones. 

PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS TEACHER EDUCATION 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

365r. Principles of Business Education 

The scope and functions of the agencies and institutions for busi- 
ness education; the aims and objectives of business education. An eval- 
uation of various business curricula in relation to modern educational 
philosophy, trends in business education, and findings of research. Three 
hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hardaway, Mr. Littlejohn. 



Department of Business Education 105 

463r. Methods and Student Teaching in the Skill Subjects 

Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials, and methods for 
teaching office skills. Provisions for directed observation of demonstra- 
tion teaching and for supervised teaching experience in the Curry 
School, in the Greensboro Senior High School, and in other co-operating 
public high schools. A co-ordinated program in which classroom lectures 
and individual and group conferences are closely related to the imme- 
diate teaching experience of the student teacher. Credit, three semester 
hours. Materials fee, $1.00. Staff. 

464r. Methods and Student Teaching in Basic Business Subjects 

Selection, organization, and evaluation of appropriate textbook and 
supplementary materials, and critical analysis of techniques and pro- 
cedures in teaching basic business subjects. Study of methods and ma- 
terials co-ordinated with directed observation of demonstration teach- 
ing and supervised teaching in the Curry School, in the Greensboro 
Senior High School, and in other co-operating public high schools. 
Credit, three semester hours. Materials fee, $1.00. Staff. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate program in business education for the Graduate School 
of the University of North Carolina is a function of the Woman's Col- 
lege Center. Students are encouraged to complete some graduate study 
at the Chapel Hill Center. The program is designed to prepare master 
teachers and supervisors of business subjects, including teachers and 
heads of departments in secondary schools, junior colleges, and teacher- 
training institutions. The teacher-training function of the North Caro- 
lina Distributive Education Service is an integral part of the graduate 
program in business education. A special leaflet outlining the require- 
ments for the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education 
may be obtained from the head of the department, on request. 

505. Business Statistics 

A study of the steps in the statistical approach to problems in busi- 
ness and economics; collection of data; presentation of tables and 
graphs; analysis of frequency distributions and time series; calcula- 
tion of ratios, index numbers, and linear correlation coefficients. Em- 
phasis on the significance, usefulness, and limitations of statistical 
methods in dealing with economic data. Credit, two to three semester 
hours. Miss Hardaway. 

510. Research Seminar 

An introductory course in research which the student should take 
before attempting to write a thesis. A general introduction of methods 
of advanced study, a critical analysis of research in business education, 
and intensive work on a definite problem. Credit, two to four semester 
hours. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn, Miss Hardaway. 



106 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

511. Review of Research 

An advanced course in research, providing for intensive study, 
analysis, and evaluation of research in business education and related 
fields. Credit, two to four semester hours. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn. 

512. Field Study 

Opportunity for individual investigation, conducted in absentia with 
periodic conferences and reports required. Students are encouraged to 
study their individual problems with approved research techniques. 
Credit, two to four semester hours. Staff. 

514. Tests and Measurements in Business Education 

A study of the types, functions, construction, evaluation, adminis- 
tration, and scoring of tests in business courses. Analysis and inter- 
pretation of test results. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Hardaway. 

515, 516. Seminar in Teaching 

Critical examination and evaluation of current research in teaching 
procedures. One hour. Credit, one semester hour. Credit for two semes- 
ters may be allowed in this course. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn. 

520. Principles and Problems in Business Education 

Problems and issues in business education, including philosophy, 
functions, and relationships. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Little- 
john, Miss Hardaway. 

523. Principles and Problems in Distributive Education 

Orientation in the field of distributive education: discussion of the 
principles and relationships in the federally aided programs and other 
types of co-operative and part-time programs. Consideration given to 
materials and procedures in retailing. Credit, two semester hours. 

525. Organization and Administration of Distributive Education 

The selection, placement, supervision, co-ordination, and teaching of 
students in co-operative work-study programs in secondary schools. 
Special consideration given to federal and state legislation and regula- 
tions governing distributive education. Credit, two semester hours. 

529a. Curriculum Problems in Business Education 

An evaluation of present curriculum practices and trends in terms 
of the functions of education and business education. The curriculum 
workshop technique is followed. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Littlejohn. 

529b. Course-Making in Technical Business Education 

The statement of objectives, selection of appropriate teaching ma- 
terials, learning exercises, and recommended teaching procedures in the 
courses which have as their primary purpose technical skill develop- 



Department of Business Education 107 

ment and job training for the office occupations. The curriculum work- 
shop technique is followed, with an opportunity to work on individual 
problems. Credit, one to two semester hours. Staff. 

529c. Course-Making in Basic Business Education 

Consideration of the scope, objectives, teaching materials, and teach- 
ing procedures in (1) the courses which have for their primary pur- 
pose the development of economic intelligence of all students, and (2) 
the courses which have for their primary purpose the development of an 
understanding of business and job intelligence essential for success in 
business occupations. The curriculum workshop technique is followed, 
with an opportunity to work on individual problems. Credit, one to two 
semester hours. Mr. Littlejohn. 

s531. Improving Instruction in Bookkeeping 

Recommended materials and procedures in teaching bookkeeping, and 
an analysis of standardized test materials. Credit, two semester hours, 
Staff. 

532. Improving Instruction in Distributive Education 

Organization and presentation of materials in retailing, with par- 
ticular reference to their use in co-operative programs; the conference 
method as an integrating procedure. Credit, two semester hours. Staff. 

s535. Improving Instruction in Gregg Shorthand 

Materials and methods in Gregg shorthand, new classroom pro- 
cedures and techniques, and recent research and standards of achieve- 
ment. Opportunity for observation in a demonstration class. Credit, two 
semester hours. Staff. 

s536. Improving Instruction in Typewriting 

Materials and methods of teaching typewriting. Special attention to 
a study of individual differences. Opportunity for observation in a dem- 
onstration class. Credit, two semester hours. Staff. 

539r. Improving Instruction in Office Practice 

Materials and teaching procedures in office and clerical practice, in- 
cluding an acquaintance with and instructional use of office machines. 
Six laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Miss Adams. 

591,592. Thesis 

Graduate students with approved thesis subjects may register for 
this course. Credit may be divided between two semesters. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Wellman, Mr. Littlejohn, Miss Hardaway. 



108 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Schaeffer (Head of the Department), Petty, 
Barrow; Associate Professor Marble; Assistant Professor 
Adams; Instructor Alice Ryan; Assistants Georgia Ryan, 
Taylor, McRimmon. 

101-102. General Chemistry 

An introduction to the theories, principles, and applications of the 
various fields of chemistry. Two lecture hours and three laboratory 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.50 
each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Adams, Miss Ryan, Mrs. Ryan. 

103-104. General Chemistry 

A general course designed for those students who have had high- 
school chemistry. Offered for students who present one unit in chem- 
istry for entrance. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.50 each semes- 
ter. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Ryan, Mrs. Ryan, Miss Taylor. 

221. Qualitative Analysis 

A study of the theoretical principles of inorganic qualitative analysis, 
with laboratory work in the separation and identification of the com- 
mon cations and anions using the semi-micro technique. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104. One lecture hour and six laboratory 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.50. Miss Marble, Mrs. McRimmon. 

225. Introductory Course in Organic Chemistry 

An introduction to organic chemistry in preparation for Chemistry 
326. Prerequisite, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Barrow, Miss Taylor. 

231-332. Organic Chemistry 

A study of the aliphatic hydrocarbons, their derivatives, fats, carbo- 
hydrates, proteins, and the aromatic series of organic compounds. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 101-102 or 103-104- One lecture hour and six lab- 
oratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.50 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Adams, Mrs. McRimmon. 

322. Inorganic Quantitative Analysis 

An introduction to quantitative analysis including a study of the 
principles and methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. In the 
laboratory work the main emphasis is placed upon volumetric methods. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 221. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4*50. 
Miss Marble, Mrs. McRimmon. 



Department of Chemistry 109 

323. Advanced Inorganic Quantitative Analysis 

A continuation of Chemistry 322. In the laboratory work the em- 
phasis is placed upon gravimetric methods of analysis. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 822. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, first semes' 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Marble. 

326. Introductory Course in Biochemistry 

An introduction to biochemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 225. Two 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Barrow, Miss Taylor. 

335-336. Biochemistry 

The chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, with studies in 
digestion, urine and blood analysis, and tissues. Prerequisites, Chem- 
istry 231-832, 322. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50 each semester. 
Miss Barrow, Miss Taylor. 

337, 338. Qualitative Organic Analysis 

A study of the identifying characteristics of various classes of or- 
ganic compounds, together with laboratory practice in the identification 
of pure compounds and simple mixtures. Prerequisite, Chemistry 231' 
332. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours for the year. Credit, 
three hours each semester. Laboratory fee, $4.50 each semester. Miss 
Adams. 

(Offered on demand.) 

342. Physical Chemistry Lectures 

An introduction to the principles and problems of physical chemistry. 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 221, 322, 231-332; Mathematics 101-102 or 103- 
104; Physics 101-102. Two lecture hours, first semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Schaeffer. 

343. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

To accompany Chemistry 342. Practice in the making of fundamen- 
tal physico-chemical measurements, with emphasis on the mathematical 
treatment and interpretation of scientific data. Prerequisites, see Chem- 
istry 342. Six laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $4-50. Miss Marble. 

344. Physical Chemistry 

A continuation of Chemistry 342, 343 dealing with chemical equi- 
librium and kinetics, electrochemistry, atomic structure, and colloid 
chemistry. Prerequisites, Chemistry 842,343. One lecture hour and six 
laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $4.50. Miss Marble. 



110 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

The purpose of this course is to co-ordinate the previous course work 
of the student in the field of chemistry and to present a general survey 
of the field. Required of all students majoring in chemistry. Three 
lecture hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Schaeffer. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Lecturer in the Humanities 1 Isenberg (Acting Head of 
the Department) ; Assistant Professor 2 Laine (Head of the 
Department) ; Lecturer Madie W. Barrett. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION 
(No knowledge of Greek or Latin required) 

lllr. Mythology 

Designed mainly for freshmen. The great myths of the world, with 
frequent references to the literature which they inspired. The Greek, 
Roman, and Norse mythologies are stressed. Three hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

330. Ancient Art. See Art 330. 

335. Greek and Latin Literature in Translation 

Introductory lectures on the art of epic poetry and the influence of 
the Greek and Roman epic upon subsequent literature. Homer and Ver- 
gil studied in translation. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Laine, Mr. Isenberg. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

336. Greek and Latin Literature in Translation 

Devoted mainly to the study of Greek tragedy through the medium 
of translations, though some attention is paid to other types of Greek 
and Latin literature. Accompanied by lectures on Greek literary and 
religious conceptions, on the ideals which made Greek culture pre-emi- 
nent in the history of thought, and on the influence of Greek literature 
upon subsequent thought. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Laine, Mr. Isenberg. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 



a For 1952-1953. 

2 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



Department of Classical Civilization 111 

397. The Epic in World Literature 

A course in the comparative study of major world epics through the 
medium of translations. The following works will be read in whole or 
in part: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Maha-Bharata, Ramayana, Chanson de 
Roland, Nibelungenlied, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, 
KalevaUi, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

398. Studies in World Types of the Drama 

Comparative studies by means of translations of some of the best 
of the Greek, Latin, and modern plays. Representative plays from 
Aeschylus through Euripides, Terence, and Racine to O'Neill. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

GREEK 

201-202. Greek for Beginners 

Greek language and cultural influences. Emphasis on the fundamen- 
tal principles of grammar, and special attention to the correlation of 
Greek grammar with the grammar of modern languages, particularly 
English. Open to freshmen and recommended for students of the lan- 
guages, religion, and medicine. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Laine, Mr. Isenberg. 

203-204. Xenophon, "Anabasis"; Selections from the New Testament 

Designed to develop fluency in the reading of Greek and to introduce 
the student to a part of the great literature of the past. Selections from 
Lucian. Prerequisite, Greek 101-102 or two entrance units. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

325, 326. Homer, "Illiad" 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

401, 402. Plato, Selected Works (Apology, Crito, etc.) 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

403, 404. Greek Drama 

Selected works of Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes; 
lectures on the development and production of ancient dramatic litera- 
ture. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Laine, 
Mr. Isenberg. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

450. Co-ordinating Course for Majors 

Extensive reading in literature of the Classics selected in accordance 
with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, and quizzes 
throughout the term. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 



112 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

LATIN 

101-102. Latin for Beginners 

Essentials of grammar and reading of selections from Caesar. De- 
signed to give a fundamental knowledge of the Latin language, to pre- 
sent an introduction to the further study of Roman literature and civili- 
zation, and to provide for a greater understanding of English by means 
of the comparative study of English and Latin words and syntax. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. Barrett. 

103-104. Intermediate Latin 

Review of fundamentals. Selected reading from Caesar, Cicero, Ovid, 
and others. The second semester will be devoted to Vergil's Aeneid, I-VI, 
with lectures on pertinent topics and emphasis upon literary apprecia- 
tion. Prerequisite, Latin 101-102, or two or three entrance units. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. Barrett. 

201-202. Roman Comedy and Lyric 

Study of the background of the Roman drama and lyric; selections 
from the odes and epodes of Horace and the poetry of Catullus. Read- 
ing of selected plays of Plautus. Prerequisite, Latin 10 3-10 U or four en- 
trance units. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Isenberg. 

209. Latin Prose and Poetry Selections 

Livy, Sallust, Ovid, Suetonius, Gellius, etc. Prerequisite, four en- 
trance units or three entrance units by consent of the instructor. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

210. Roman Oratory and Philosophy 

Readings from Cicero and Lucretius. Prerequisite, 201-202 or four 
entrance units. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

COURSES FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

Not all of the following courses will be offered in any one year; a 
selection will be made to meet the needs and desires of students major- 
ing in Latin. Other courses in Latin literature will be offered as needed. 
These courses may be offered either semester. 



Commercial Department 113 

322. Roman Comedy 

Terence. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

323. Elegiac Poetry 

Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. A study of Latin elegiac 
poetry; its source, types, and influence. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Laine. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

326. Roman Satire 

Readings from Martial and Juvenal. Lectures and written reports. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

331. Advanced Prose Composition 

Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

333. Vergil 

Readings in the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. The art of Vergil 
in its development. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

342. History and Politics in the Times of Julius Caesar 

A study of the period 63-44 B.C. Readings from Sullust's Catiline, 
Suetonius's Life of Julius Caesar, Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War, 
and Cicero's Orations and Letters. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Laine. 

450. Co-ordinating Course for Majors 

Extensive readings in literature of the Classics selected in accord- 
ance with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, and 
quizzes throughout the term. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Laine. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Assistant Professors Fergerson (Acting Head of the De- 
partment), Harrell, Devinny; Instructors Weyl, McEntire, 
Debter, Secor. 

Applicants for admission to the Commercial Department must be 
graduates of accredited high schools. Two courses, secretarial and ac- 
counting, each leading to a certificate, are offered by the department. 
The two courses are the same for the first semester. 



114 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



At the beginning of the second semester a student may choose be- 
tween Accounting 34 and Shorthand 22. To receive a certificate, a stu- 
dent must complete satisfactorily the prescribed courses and meet spe- 
cific skill requirements in typewriting, shorthand, and office machines. 
Credits earned in the Commercial Department may be applied toward 
a Bachelor's degree. Students transferring to a degree program must 
satisfy the entrance requirements for the degree chosen as listed on 
page 74. 



First Semester S.H. 

Typewriting 11 1 

Shorthand 21 3 

Accounting 33 3 

Business Correspondence 26r . . 3 

Health 103r 2 

Physical Education 107r 1 

Office Machines 

(either semester) 



Second Semester S.H. 

Typewriting 12 1 

Shorthand 22 3 

or 

Accounting 34 3 

Business Correspondence, Health, 
Physical Education, and Office 
Machines if not taken in first 
semester. 



11-12. Typewriting 

Development of basic typewriting skills and sustained production on 
various types of problems met in the business office. Students receiv- 
ing a certificate must be able to type with a minimum rate of 65 correct 
words a minute on a series of five-minute straight copy tests with er- 
rors totaling no more than 5 per cent of words typed; to maintain a 
rate of speed, on a series of production tests, comparable to office re- 
quirements; 33 words a minute on rough drafts; and 1.5 envelopes a 
minute. All production work must be mailable. Five hours for the year. 
Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fees, $4.00. Miss DeVinny, 
Miss Weyl, Mrs. Debter, Miss Secor, Mr. Fergerson. 

21. Shorthand 

The fundamental principles of Gregg Shorthand. Pretranscription 
training. Daily. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harrell, Miss Weyl, 
Miss Devinny, Mrs. McEntire, Mrs. Debter, Miss Secor. 

22. Shorthand 

An intensive course in dictation and transcription. Students receiv- 
ing certificates in the secretarial course must be able to pass with a 
transcription rate of 25 words a minute and 99 per cent accuracy a 
series of shorthand tests dictated at the rate of 90 words a minute for 
a minimum of five minutes; to average for a given period a minimum 
transcription rate of 22 words a minute on letters of medium length 
and difficulty, with 60 per cent in mailable form. Two hours daily. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harrell, Miss Weyl, Mrs. McEntire, 
Miss DeVinny, Mrs. Debter, Miss Secor. 



Department of Economics 115 

26r. Business Correspondence 

A detailed study of the major types of business letters and practice 
in the composition of office correspondence. Three hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Harrell, Mrs. McEntire. 

33-34. Principles of Accounting 

The principles of accounting theory, closing the books, and prepara- 
tion of statements. Analysis of forms and procedures currently used 
in business organizations. Recitations and laboratory problems. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Fergerson, Mrs. 
McEntire. 

Office Machines 

Development of a working knowledge in the use of adding and cal- 
culating machines and a marketable skill on voice-writing machines, 
with emphasis on mailable transcripts. No credit. Miss DeVinny. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Professors Keister (Head of the Department), Little- 
john; Assistant Professor Lindsey; Instructors Renfroe, 
Frazier. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

211. Principles of Economics 

A study of the present-day economic system; specialization; machine 
industry; large-scale production; function of middlemen and markets; 
demand, supply, and prices; money, credit, and banking. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Frazier, Mr. Renfroe. 

212. Principles of Economics 

Business cycles and depressions; international trade, foreign ex- 
change, protective tariffs, and monopolies; the distribution of wealth in 
modern society; consumption; a comparison of capitalism, fascism, so- 
cialism, and communism. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Frazier, Mr. Renfroe. 

1233-234. Principles of Accounting 

The typical transactions of a business firm as they pass through the 
books ; closing the books and making up the statements. Business forms 
and practices are analyzed to give a familiarity with modern business 
procedure. Recitations and laboratory problems. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Lindsey. 



3 This course cannot be offered to satisfy the social science requirement for graduation. 



116 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

325r. General Economics — Briefer Course 

A survey of elementary economics especially designed for students 
who may want only one semester of work in the field. A brief treat- 
ment will be given to the production and distribution of wealth in 
society, to money and banking, to the organization of corporations, to 
the business cycle, and to labor problems. Elective for juniors and sen- 
iors except those who have had Economics 211, 212. Three hours. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Frazier, Mr. Renfroe. 

327. Money and Banking 

How our different varieties of money and credit instruments are 
issued and secured; the functions performed by money in our society; 
the services of commercial banks and of the Federal Reserve System. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

431-432. Business Law 

The general principles of business law, including contracts, agency, 
sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, and bank- 
ruptcy. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Littlejohn. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

523. Public Finance 

The chief governmental expenditures and the main sources of reve- 
nue used by governments ; property taxes ; income and inheritance taxes, 
and various forms of sales taxes; the distribution of the tax burden on 
different classes in society; improvements needed in the tax structure; 
managing the heavy federal debt. Open to graduate students in Busi- 
ness Education. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Renfroe. 

524. Labor Problems 

The conflict of interest between workers and employers, and some of 
the more important results of this conflict, such as labor organizations, 
collective bargaining, and labor legislation. Open to graduate students 
in Business Education. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

528r. The Management of Personal Finances 

Budgeting and keeping account of one's personal funds; borrowing 
money; buying on credit and making out personal income tax returns; 



Department op Economics 117 

saving and the wise investing of savings. Open to graduate students in 
Business Education. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Keister. 

530r. Principles of Marketing 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of 
the functions, policies, and institutions involved in the marketing process. 
Marketing changes brought about by chain stores, super-markets, frozen 
foods, etc., will be studied. Open to graduate students in Business Edu- 
cation. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

534. Social Control of Business 

The responsibilities of business to society are emphasized in this 
course. Different methods of encouraging and compelling business to 
recognize its social responsibilities are discussed, including governmental 
regulations of corporations, rate fixing of public utility enterprises, the 
conservation of natural and human resources, and the better ethical 
practices voluntarily developed by business itself. Open to graduate stu- 
dents in Business Education. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

550. Comparative Economic Systems 

A comparison of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism as 
economic systems and as philosophies. The practical difficulties encoun- 
tered when a society changes from one system to another and when any 
system operates on a nation-wide basis in the modern world. Open to 
graduate students in Business Education. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Renfroe. 



118 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Hurley (Head of the Department), Hall, 
Taylor, Dunn, Wilson, Summerell, James Painter, ^ried- 
laender, Tillett; Associate Professors Rowley, Bridgers, 
2 Jarrell, Bush; Assistant Professors Spivey, England, 
Bowman, Rogers, Macauley, Mueller; Instructors Kath- 
leen Painter, ^ink, Griffith, White, Snider, Perrin; 
Graduate Assistant Burgess. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. A 
freshman whose proficiency in composition and in reading is below col- 
legiate standard shall be enrolled in English A, without credit, until 
the required standard is attained and she can be admitted to English 
101. A deficient student may also be asked to work in a special section 
in remedial English, one or two hours a week, while taking English 
101. Any undergraduate whose work in a course in any department 
gives evidence of lack of proficiency in written English or in reading 
ability shall be referred to the Department of English; she will then 
be sent to a section in remedial English to correct her deficiencies. 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

REQUIRED COURSES 

English A. 

A non-credit course required of freshmen whose proficiency in com- 
position and in reading, as shown in the placement tests given all be- 
ginning students, is below collegiate standard. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. No credit. Mrs. Painter, Mrs. Sink, Miss Snider. 

101-102. English Composition 

A course designed to develop the student's ability to read with dis- 
crimination and to write effectively. Frequent practice in theme writing 
throughout the year. First semester: a review of fundamentals in Eng- 
lish, the reading and writing of exposition. Second semester: a con- 
tinuation of the study of exposition, the use of source materials, and 
some study of various types of narrative, dramatic, and critical writ- 
ing. For freshmen. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Painter, Mr. Hall, Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wilson, Miss Summerell, 
Mr. Friedlaender, Miss Tillett, Miss Rowley, Mr. Bridgers, Mr. Jarrell, 
Miss Bush, Mrs. Spivey, Mrs. Rogers, Mr. Macauley, Mr. Mueller, Mrs. 
Painter, Mrs. Sink, Mr. Griffith, Miss Snider, Mr. Perrin. 



*On leave of absence, second semester, 1952-1953. 
2 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



Department of English 119 

211-212. English Literature 

An introduction to English literature through the study of major 
works. The reading and writing discipline of English 101-102 is con- 
tinued, with the emphasis upon the interpretation of literary masters 
and upon the intelligent appreciation of certain masterpieces. For sopho- 
mores. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hall, 
Mr. Hurley, Mr. W. R. Taylor, Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wilson, Miss Summerell, 
Mr. Painter, Mr. Friedlaender, Miss Tillett, Miss Rowley, Mr. Bridgers, 
Miss Bush, Mrs. Spivey, Mrs. Rogers, Mr. Macauley, Mr. Mueller, Mrs. 
Sink, Mr. Griffith, Miss Snider, Mr. Perrin. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The courses listed below are open to qualified students according to 
the college regulations except as specifically stated in the course descrip- 
tions. For example, although Speech 111 ordinarily will be elected by 
first-year students, it may be elected by upperclassmen. Courses 327 
and 335, Play Production, and Stage Lighting, for example, and courses 
301 or 302, European Literary Masterpieces, although primarily junior 
and senior electives, may be elected by sophomores who have shown 
distinction in English 101-102. 

The student who majors in English, in addition to the required Eng- 
lish Literature and Composition (211-212), is expected to elect three 
hours of American Literature (351 or 352 or 554) and to elect Shake- 
speare (339). Beyond these elections, with the advice of the head of the 
department or her department adviser, she will be expected to decide 
on one of the following sequences: (1) English Literature, (2) Ameri- 
can Literature, (3) Writing and Language, (4) Drama and Theatre. 
The student should also arrange, when possible, for the intelligent cor- 
relation of her sequence with other subjects. Details concerning these 
sequences may be obtained at the office of the Department of English. 
The student majoring in English is permitted to take six hours in speech 
and/or in radio or play production techniques as part of her free elec- 
tives. Courses from which the six hours of free electives may be taken 
are 215, 217, 219, 220, 229, 231, 317, 327, 332, 335. In preparation for 
the departmental examination, the major in English will be assigned to 
a tutor, with whom she will work individually and in small groups in 
English 449. 

105. An Approach to Narrative 

The course, intended primarily for freshmen who do not plan to 
major in English, is designed to give the student a knowledge of various 
types of narrative and to stimulate purposeful and discriminating read- 
ing for pleasure. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. 



120 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

107r. Introduction to the Dramatic Arts 

An elementary course in the nature of the theatre: its materials, 
its methods, its literature. The varied aspects of the theatre will be 
studied, with selected plays used as illustrative material. Intimate 
acquaintance with theatre problems will be supplied by crew work. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. Thirty 
crew hours per semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 

SPEECH 

lllr. Oral Composition 

The theory and practice of speech communication. The gathering and 
organizing of materials; special stress on vocabulary building, and on 
the principles and technique of composing and projecting effective 
speech. Training in diction and stage presence. Subject matter for 
practice speeches is varied to suit all types of formal and informal pub- 
lic address. Whenever possible this subject matter is related to cur- 
rent work in Freshman English. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Taylor, Mr. White. 

215. Speech for Drama and Radio 

A fundamental course designed to develop the technique needed for 
these media of communication; the mechanism of the voice; enunciation 
and pronunciation; tone, color, pitch, dialects. Two hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. White. 

217r. The Speaking Voice 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enunciation 

and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises designed to 

overcome the defects of the individual voice. Two hours. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss England. 

219. Speech Clinic 

Remedial speech work for students with speech defects. This work 
will be adapted to the varying needs of class members. Students are 
expected to come into the class of their own accord or upon recommenda- 
tions of advisers, department heads, or interested faculty members. Cer- 
tain students who elect English 217 may be placed in this special class. 
Two hours. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

220. Oral Interpretation 

A course designed to develop proficiency in reading and in the oral 
interpretation of literature. Prerequisite, English 217 or permission of 
the instructor. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss England. 

229r. Fundamentals of Speech 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enunciation 
and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; application in the reading of 



Department of English 121 

■ 

prose and verse. A basic course designed for those who are planning 
to meet the recommendations for teacher education and open to other 
students as an elective. A student who has had 217 will not be admitted 
to this course. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss England. 

367. Storytelling 

A study of the art and technique of storytelling; of the material 
available in the field; practice in the telling of stories. Prerequisite, 
English 217 or 229. Required of students in the interdepartmental ma- 
jor in Recreation; elective for others with the approval of the instructor. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss England. 

WRITING AND LANGUAGE 

221. Advanced Composition 

A writing course for students beyond the freshman year. 

Section A. Creative Writing. A beginning course in the writing of 
the short story and poetry. Student work will be discussed in class and 
in individual conferences. Parallel reading of contemporary authors 
will be stressed. Mrs. Rogers. 

Section B. A Course in Expository Writing. Reading, class discus- 
sion and practice in the writing of essays, criticism, and other forms 
of exposition. Miss Summerell. 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

222. Advanced Composition 

A writing course for students beyond the freshman year. 

Section A. Creative Writing. A continuation of English 221. Mrs. 
Rogers. 

Section B. Studies in descriptive, interpretative, and narrative writ- 
ing. Practice designed to meet the interests of the class. Miss Summerell. 

May be elected independently of English 221. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

223. Journalism I 

An elementary course in journalistic writing, with special emphasis 
on the gathering and writing of news. Analysis of formal and informal 
stories of news and the analysis and writing of feature articles and 
editorials. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Dunn. 

224. Journalism II 

A continuation of Journalism I, with emphasis upon the editorial 
point of view. Further study and writing of the forms of news-stories. 
Emphasis on the understanding and practice of the reading of copy and 
proof and of headline- writing and make-up. (Students who may be 



122 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

called upon later to help others in the publication of high-school news- 
papers and magazines should find the course helpful.) Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. 

313. The English Language I 

The origin and nature of language. The Indo-European languages. 
Readings in Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and early Modern English 
to show the influence of these on current English. The influence of other 
languages on English — especially Greek, Latin, and French. Simple 
and compound words, prefixes and suffixes, etymology. Phonology, mor- 
phology, word-finding, problems in usage, proper names. Linguistic 
laws. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Wilson. 

314. The English Language II 

Semantics. Restrictions on language. Current influences on English 
A study of British and American dictionaries: merits and defects; 
editors and their policies; diacritical marks and phonetic alphabets; 
vocabulary, definitions, synonyms, idioms, standards of pronunciation. 
Variant and disputed pronunciation ; the pronunciation of classical words 
in English context; historical background of spelling, simplified and 
phonetic spelling, variant and preferred spelling, plurals, spelling rules. 
Readings in good English to illustrate its qualities. Language and in- 
ternational affairs. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Wilson. 

319. English Grammar 

A brief course in modern English grammar; the relationship of 
grammar and composition. Designed for prospective teachers who have 
taken or are taking courses in advanced composition. Credit will not 
be given for both S19 and 321. One hour, first semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Mrs. Painter. 

321. Grammar and Composition 

The content of the course includes the principles of grammar and 
rhetoric and weekly composition illustrative of the fundamentals of 
writing. This course satisfies the state requirement for prospective 
teachers of English. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Wilson. 

325. The Writing Workshop I 

A writing laboratory course devoted to fiction, verse, and criticism. 

Section A. Fiction. A course in the writing of fiction. Student work 
will be criticized in class and in individual conferences. There will be 
parallel reading and class discussion of the work of contemporary novel- 
ists and short story writers. Mr. Macauley. 



Department of English 123 

Section B. Poetry and Criticism. The student writes poems or criti- 
cism of fiction and poetry, according to her special interests; student 
work is criticized in conference, or occasionally, in class. Works by 
poets such as Auden, Eliot, Dickinson, Hardy, Donne, and Blake; by 
writers such as Chekov, Tolstoy, Melville, James, Dickens, and Malraux; 
and by critics such as Eliot, Empson, Blackmur, and Wilson, are read 
and analyzed in class. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

Prerequisite, the completion of either English 221 or 222, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 

326. The Writing Workshop II 

A continuation of English 325. 

Section A. Fiction. Mr. Macauley. 

Section B. Poetry and Criticism. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

Prerequisite, the completion of either English 221 or 222, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. This course may be elected independently of 
English 325. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

THEATRE 

231. Acting 

Fundamental acting techniques. Theory and practice in vital expres- 
siveness of thought and emotion through voice and body under special 
conditions. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
White. 

317. Radio and Television Production 

A basic course in the elements of radio and television production 
covering the problems faced by the director and the producer. All im- 
portant types of broadcasts and specific problems of each type are 
studied. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
White. 

318. Writing for Radio and Television 

A basic course in writing designed to acquaint the student with 
problems and demands of the radio and television media. All important 
types of continuity and script are studied. Students write a minimum 
of one script each week. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. White. 

327. Play Production 

A practical study of problems and techniques involved in the con- 
struction and painting of scenery, stage lighting, make-up, costuming, 
and stage design. Qualified sophomores will be admitted to this course 
by permission of the instructor. One lecture and six laboratory hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. 
Bowman. 



124 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

335. Stage Lighting 

A beginning course in the theory and practice of stage lighting. 
Qualified sophomores will be admitted to this course by permission of 
the instructor. One lecture and six laboratory hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Bowman. 

329. Playwriting 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 

332. Play Direction 

A study of modern methods and techniques in the direction of plays, 
with extensive practice in actual direction of short scenes. Three lec- 
ture-laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Bowman. 

333. History of the Theatre 

Intended to give the student a knowledge of the specific conditions 
under which the great plays of the western world have been produced. 
A consideration of audience, actors, patrons, the physical conditions, 
architecture, and the relation of the theatre to the various arts. Project- 
tion of the production of representative plays, which the student will 
read. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. 

literature 

271, 272. The Literary Study of the Bible 

A study of the Bible as a part of the world's great literature. This 
course seeks to give the student a fuller comprehension of the Bible 
through a more intelligent appreciation of its excellencies of form and 
structure. Representative masterpieces will be considered — among them 
essays, orations, stories, and poems. Two hours for the year. Credit, 
two hours each semester. Mr. Hall. 

301. European Literary Masterpieces, 400-1600 

A reading course designed to acquaint the student through transla- 
tions with the outstanding monuments of our western literary heritage. 
Literature originally written in English will be excluded. Emphasis 
upon the understanding of complete texts. A consideration of Dante, 
Erasmus, Montaigne, Cervantes, and others. Prerequisite for sopho- 
mores, B or better in English 102. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 

302. European Literary Masterpieces, 1600-1900 

A continuation of English 301. A consideration of Moliere, Voltaire, 
Goethe, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Stendhal, Tolstoy, Zola, and others. Pre- 
requite for sophomores, B or better in English 211. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 



Department of English 125 

311. Readings in English and American Literature 

Designed to allow the student to follow and to develop her reading 
interests in an informal way. The students will meet in small groups, 
membership in which will be determined by common interests. Designed 
especially for the non-English major. Especially qualified sophomores 
will be admitted to this course by permission of the instructor. One 
hour f first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Painter. 

312. Readings in English and American Literature 

A continuation or a repetition of English 311. This course may be 
elected by students who have had English 311. One hour, second semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Painter, Mr. Hurley, Mr. Taylor. 

336. Chaucer 

A study of the major and certain of the minor poems of Chaucer, 
with literary rather than linguistic emphasis. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Summerell, Mr. Bridgers. (In 
1953-1954, Mr. Bridgers.) 

339r. Shakespeare 

A study of twelve representative plays: Richard HI, Henry IV 
(Part 1 or Part 2), Henry V, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Mer- 
chant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, The Tempest, As You Like 
It, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra. Three 
hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender, Mr. Bridgers, 
Mrs. Spivey. (In 1953-1954, first semester, Mrs. Spivey; second semes- 
ter, Mr. Bridgers.) 

341. Milton 

Milton's major poetry in its seventeenth-century setting in poetry 
and philosophy. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Rowley. 

342. The Seventeenth Century 

A consideration of the major writers in England from 1610 to 1700. 
Particular attention to Bacon, Browne, Dryden, Butler, Milton's prose 
and minor poems, seventeenth-century lyricism; some attention to the 
drama of the Restoration. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Rowley, Mr. Mueller. 

359. The Eighteenth Century 

English literature from 1700 to 1785. Particular attention to the 
periodical, to Pope, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, and Burke; some con- 
sideration of eighteenth-century drama, especially of the plays of Far- 
quhar, Goldsmith, Sheridan. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Painter. 



126 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

343. Wordsworth and Coleridge 

An intensive study of the works of Wordsworth and Coleridge, with 
attention to the development of the Romantic movement. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

344. The Later Romanticists 

The major poems of the later Romantic poets and some prose of the 
period. May be elected independently of English 3U3. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

345. Victorian Literature 

The important writings (exclusive of the novel) of the era between 
1832-1880. Although some attention will be given to the historical and 
cultural aspects of the age, the major emphasis will be upon the litera- 
ture. The following are among the main figures studied: Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, Rossetti, Elizabeth Browning, Carlyle, 
Ruskin, Newman, Morris, Clough. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Bush. 

351. American Literature to 1850 

American culture and literature from 1667 through Emerson. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the expansion of the American mind in the 
writings of Benjamin Franklin, Freneau, Brown, Irving, Cooper, Bryant, 
Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whittier, Thoreau, and Emerson. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

352r. American Literature from 1850 to 1900 

American literature from the middle of the nineteenth century to 
1900. Emphasis upon the effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction; 
Upon the local color movement; upon the rise of realism, the develop- 
ment of the social revolt, and the beginnings of naturalism. Among the 
authors studied are: Lowell, Longfellow, Holmes, Melville, Whitman, 
Lanier, Mark Twain, Howells, James, Lafcadio Hearn, Henry Adams, 
Crane, Norris, and Emily Dickinson. Three hours. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. First Semester, Mr. Hurley; second semester, Mr. Hall. 

382. The Modern Drama 

The drama of the late nineteenth century and of the twentieth cen- 
tury. A consideration of plays by such representative writers as Ibsen, 
Hauptmann, Sudermann, Strindberg, Gorky, Tolstoy, Chekov, Brieux, 
Rostand, Maeterlinck; D'Annunzio, Pirandello, Synge, Yeats, O'Casey, 
Wilde, Shaw, Barrie, Galsworthy, Molnar, O'Neill. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

384. The Short Story 

The history and development of the short story, with analysis and 
discussion of the best classic and contemporary stories, both European 
and American. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Rowley. 



Department of English 127 

449r. Co-ordinating Course 

The co-ordinating course is designed to give the student opportunity 
to organize significantly her work in her major subject and to co-ordi- 
nate this with work in other subjects. The course is conducted by the 
tutorial method. Required of all senior English majors. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

525. Writing — Advanced 

A continuation of English 325; a course reserved for writers wha 
have been encouraged to continue creative work through a second year 

Section A. Fiction. An advanced course designed for those who have 
had at least one year's instruction at the undergraduate level in the 
writing of narrative and have demonstrated through the submitting oi 
MSS an understanding of the principles of the composition of fiction 
and proficiency in the practice of it. Although the emphasis in class 
discussion will fall upon the writing done by the students, extensive 
reading of fiction and of the criticism of fiction will be required. Pre* 
requisites for graduate credit: (1) the successful completion of a semes- 
ter course in advanced composition and in English 325-A (or the equiva* 
lent) ; and (2) permission of the head of the Department of English and 
of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semestef 
hours. Mr. Macauley. 

Section B. Poetry and Criticism. An advanced course for those who 
have had instruction at the undergraduate level in the writing of verse 
or criticism and have demonstrated through the submitting of MSS an 
understanding of the medium and promise in it. Although emphasis in 
class discussion will be placed upon the writing done by the students, 
extensive reading in poetic and critical literature will be required. Pre* 
requisites for graduate credit: (1) the successful completion of English 
325-B (or the equivalent) ; and (2) permission of the head of the Depart* 
ment of English and of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

526. Writing — Advanced 

A continuation of English 326 and 525; a course reserved for those 
writers who have been encouraged to continue creative work through 
a second year. 

Section A. Fiction. Mr. Macauley. 

Section B. Poetry and Criticism. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 



128 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Prerequisites for graduate credit: (1) the successful completion of 
English S 25-3 26- A or B (or its equivalent) and of English 525- A or B; 
and (2) permission of the head of the Department of English and of the 
instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

530. Playwriting and Advanced Production 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. The num- 
ber of students admitted to this course must be limited to twelve. Merit- 
able scripts written by students in this class and in English 329 will be 
given production. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the successful com- 
pletion of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and Ameri- 
can literature above Grade I, of which at least three hours must have 
been in play production. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Bowman. 

537. English Literature to 1500 

An introduction to the culture of the Middle Ages. Selected readings 
in English literature from Beowulf to Malory: epic and romance (with 
special emphasis on the Arthurian legend), tales, ballads, lyrics, the 
church drama; a consideration of some of Chaucer's poems in their rela- 
tion to other works of the same types. Works in Anglo-Saxon and some 
of those in Middle English in translation. Some attention to compara- 
tive materials in other literatures and to medieval themes and forms in 
later English literature. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the success- 
ful completion of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and 
Americn literture above Grade I. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Bridgers. 

538. Literature of the English Renaissance 

English literature from 1500 to 1610. A consideration of the prin- 
cipal dramatists other than Shakespeare and of Elizabethan non-dra- 
matic poets. In addition some consideration of the prose, including 
translations of the Bible. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the success- 
ful completion of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and 
American literature above Grade I. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender, Mr. Mueller. 

540. Advanced Shakespeare 

An intensive study of eight plays of Shakespeare's maturity. Pre- 
requisite for graduate credit: the successful completion of at least nine 
hours of approved courses in English and American literature above 
Grade I, of which at least three hours must have been in the study of 
Shakespeare. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Friedlaender. 

(Offered in 1953-1954; not offered in 1954-1955.) 

547. The English Novel Through the Nineteenth Century 

An historical and critical study of the English novel from its begin- 
ning through Thomas Hardy; with emphasis on the novel in the nine- 



Department of English 129 

teenth century. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the successful comple- 
tion of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and Ameri- 
can literature above Grade I. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

548. The Modern Novel 

A study of a group of selected novels from notable novelists of the 
late nineteenth and twentieth centuries; emphasis on continental novel- 
ists with some comparative study of a few English and American novel- 
ists. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the successful completion of at 
least nine hours of approved courses in English and American literature 
above Grade I. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Spivey. 

549. Literary Criticism 

A study of important critical writings from Plato to Conrad. Par- 
ticular attention to English criticism, and to the writings which will 
assist the student in the formulation of her own critical attitude. Pre- 
requisite for graduate credit: the successful completion of at least nine 
hours of approved courses in English and American literature above 
Grade I. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Bush. 

550. Modern English Literature 

English literature since 1885. Consideration of a selected group of 
outstanding writers — essayists, novelists, dramatists, and poets. Pre- 
requisite for graduate credit: the successful completion of at least nine 
hours of approved courses in English and American literature above 
Grade I. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Hurley. 

553. Studies in American Literature 

In 1953-1954, poetry; in 1954-1955, drama; in 1955-1956, the novel. 
In 1953-1954 the course will be an intensive study of aspects of Ameri- 
can poetry. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the successful completion 
of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and American 
literature above Grade I. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

554. American Literature of the Twentieth Century 

A study of American writers from 1900 to the present. The aim of 
the course is to trace the main currents of thought in the more signifi- 
cant works of American poets and prose writers during the first four 
decades of the twentieth century. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the 
successful completion of at least nine hours of approved courses in Eng- 
lish and American literature above Grade I. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 



130 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

557. Contemporary Poetry 

A study of strictly contemporary poets whose writings reflect the 
changing aesthetic, social, political, and ethical conventions of our pres- 
ent civilizations. Prerequisite for graduate credit: the successful com- 
pletion of at least nine hours of approved courses in English and Ameri- 
can literature above Grade I. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

558. Contemporary Poetry 

A continuation of course 557. This course may be elected also by 
those who have not had English 557. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
the successful completion of at least nine hours of approved courses in 
English and American literature above Grade I. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

The graduate student in English may work toward either of two 
degrees: the Master of Fine Arts with a major in Writing and a minor 
either in other arts or in English literature; and the Master of Educa- 
tion with a major in English, or a minor in English. 

The major in English offred to students who are candidates for the 
degree Master of Education is open to those who present an approved 
undergraduate background in English and American literature and 
language, who have fulfilled requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School, and who hold a North Carolina "Class A" teacher's certificate, 
or its equivalent. 

The major in Writing is open to college graduates of demonstrated 
competence and promise in writing who have completed successfully at 
least eighteen semester hours of courses in English and American lit- 
erature above Grade I, and a minimum of six semester hours in courses 
in writing, of which three may be in advanced composition and three 
in the writing of fiction or of verse, or in playwriting. 

This major program provides for specialization in one of the forms 
of composition. The required thesis will consist of original work in 
this form together with a scholarly paper on problems raised by the 
composition. 

The regulations governing the Creative Arts Program and graduate 
work in general at the Woman's College will be found on page 216. Ad- 
ditional information may be had from the office of the Associate Dean 
of the Graduate School or the head of the Department of English. 

513. History of the English Language 

An advanced course in the history of the English language for 
graduate students. Its purpose is to give such students an understand- 



Department of English 131 

ing of current English through a study of past and present English — its 
vocabulary, forms, sounds, variations, and accompanying linguistic 
laws. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Wilson. 

514. History of English Literature from the Beginning to 1660 

The course will trace the development of English literature from the 
early Anglo-Saxon period to the Restoration and will correlate the litera- 
ture with the political, social, and philosophical currents contemporary 
with it. Some reading of literary works themselves will be required, but 
the emphasis will be on literary history. The course is planned for 
candidates for the degree Master of Education who have chosen English 
as a major, and for other graduate students who may wish to elect it. 
Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing. Credit, two semester 
hours. 

515. History of English Literature (including American Literature) 
from 1660 to the Present 

The course will trace the development of English literature (and 
American literature) with the political, social, and philosophical currents 
contemporary with it. Some reading of literary works themselves will 
be required, but the emphasis will be upon literary history. The course 
is planned for candidates for the degree Master of Education who have 
chosen English as a major, and for other graduate students who may 
wish to elect it. Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing. Credit, 
two semester hours. 

516. Studies in English and American Drama 

An advanced course in the drama. Craftsmanship, art, and themes 
o-P masters in English and American drama will be considered partly 
with a view to use in instruction of high school students. The course 
is planned for candidates for the degree Master of Education who have 
chosen English as a major, and for other graduate students who may 
wish to elect it. Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing. Credit, 
two semester hours. 

517. Studies in Lyric and Narrative Verse 

A course designed to give the secondary school teacher special famili- 
arity with that part of poetic literature in English that is best adapted 
for use at the high school level. Wide reading of lyric and narrative 
poems representative of the various types will be accompanied by a con- 
sideration of the materials, characteristics, and purposes of poetry. The 
course is planned for candidates for the degree Master of Education who 
have chosen English as a major and for other graduate students who 
may wish to elect it. Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing. 
Credit, two semester hours. 



132 Woman's College— University of North Carolina 

518. Studies in Essay, Short Story, and Biography 

A course in types of English prose, fictional and factual, designed for 
teachers in high schools. An examination of purposes, methods, styles 
in selected essays, biographies, and short stories. The course is planned 
for candidates for the degree Master of Education who have chosen 
English as a major, and for other graduate students who may wish to 
elect it. Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. 

560. Advanced Literary Criticism — Contemporary 

An intensive study of the principal contemporary schools of criti- 
cism through a consideration of selected works by R. P. Blackmur, 
Cleanth Brooks, Kenneth Burke, T. S. Eliot, William Empson, John 
Crowe Ransom, I. A. Richards, Allen Tate, Edmund Wilson, Ivor Win- 
ters. Prerequisite, the successful completion of at least eighteen hours 
of approved courses in English and American literature above Grade I, 
including a course in literary criticism. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

561. Advanced Playwriting 

An advanced course designed for those who have had instruction at 
the undergraduate level in the writing of plays. Although emphasis in 
class discussion will be placed upon the writing done by the students, 
extensive reading in dramatic and critical literature will be required. 
Prerequisite, the successful completion within the undergraduate Eng- 
lish major of the Drama and Theatre Sequence (or its equivalent), in- 
cluding a course in playwriting, or the successful completion of the 
undergraduate interdepartmental major in Art, Dance, and Drama. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

562. Studies in Poetry and Drama 

An intensive, critical approach to selected English and American 
poems reflecting a variety of types and traditions, and to certain dra- 
matic examples, primarily poetic in character. The plays for study are 
Antony and Cleopatra, The Changeling, The Alchemist, Peer Gynt, 
Cherry Orchard. The poems chosen for study are by Blake, Byron, 
Chaucer, Donne, Dryden, Eliot, Frost, Hardy, Hopkins, Marvell, Milton, 
Pope, Whitman, Wordsworth, Yeats. Prerequisite, the successful com- 
pletion of at least eighteen hours of approved courses in English and 
American literature above Grade I. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell. 

563. Studies in Great Prose Works 

A critical approach to selected works of certain prose writers, Euro- 
pean and American, nineteenth and twentieth century. The works se- 
lected for study are those which have strongest influences on contem- 
porary writing, are representative of the various literary movements of 
the time, or are especially adapted to study by young writers needing 
an understanding of structure. The writers represented include Chekov, 



Department of English 133 

Conrad, Dostoevsky, Fitzgerald, Kafka, Henry James, Joyce, Malraux, 
Mann, Melville, K. A. Porter, Proust, Stendhal, Tolstoy. Prerequisite, 
the successful completion of at least eighteen hours of approved courses 
in English and American literature above Grade I. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell. 

564. Graduate Seminar in Writing — Prose 

Prerequisite, admission to candidacy for the graduate degree in writ- 
ing. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

565. Graduate Seminar in Writing — Poetry 

Prerequisite, admission to candidacy for the graduate degree in writ- 
ing. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell. 

566. Graduate Seminar in Writing — Special Problems 

Prerequisite, admission to candidacy for the graduate degree in writ- 
ing. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jarrell, Mr. Macauley. 

567ab. The English Novel 

Credit, two or four semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

568. Directed Readings 

A course conducted by means of individual conferences with a pro- 
gram of reading formulated to meet the varying needs of each student. 
Designed with the double purpose of allowing extensive exploration in 
an author, or movement, or form toward which the young writer feels 
impelled and of preparing the student for the master's examination. 
Prerequisite, admission to candidacy for the degree. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Staff. 

590. Experimentation and Analysis — Writing 

A study of literary forms, of problems peculiar to the linguistic me- 
dium and of relationships to other media of expression, undertaken 
through the examination of standard works and experimentation in lit- 
erary composition. Not open to majors in Writing. A grounding in lit- 
erature and in composition will be assumed. Prerequisite, permission of 
the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. 

Tools of Reseach and Composition — Writing 

See Philosophy 590, Aesthetics. Required of all graduate majors in 
Writing. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Ashby, Mr. Procter. 

594. Thesis. 

Credit, two to six semester hours. 

Note: The graduate course in the Philosophy of Education (Education 
640) may be taken as a part of the minor in Writing or in Lit- 
erature. 



134 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

Professor Arundel (Head of the Department) ; Associate 
Professor Phillips ; Assistant Shirley Lee Mahan. 

101r. Introduction to Geography 

This course is designed to acquaint the beginning student with the 
physical landscape of many parts of the earth. It encourages an in- 
terest in strategic locations, in peoples of many lands, in maps and their 
uses, in world climatic regions, and in man's responses to his physical 
environment. Designed mainly as a freshman elective. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel, Mr. Phillips. 

211-212. Elements of Geography 

A geographic interpretation of such elements of man's physical en- 
vironment as planetary relations, climate, surface configuration, native 
vegetation, soil, and mineral resources. Two lecture hours ad one three- 
hour laboratory for the year. Not open to those who have had Geography 

335. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semester. 
Mr. Phillips. 

237r. Economic Geography 

The geography of economic production. Important raw commodities 
— such as food, textiles, fibers, timber, and minerals; the distribution 
of selected examples of the major types of manufacturing industries; 
and the relation between resources, manufacturing, trade, trade routes, 
and national policies and development. Required of sophomores pur- 
suing the course in secretarial administration. Three hours. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Arundel, Mr. Phillips. 

335r. General Geography 

A study of the fundamental distribution patterns of the world. Nat- 
ural features — especially climates, landforms, vegetation, and soils — 
are studied with a view toward broadening the background for the 
various fields of college work. Not open to students who have had 
Geography 211-212. Required of all candidates for primary, grammar- 
grade, and high-school certificates to teach general science. Two lecture 
hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Miss Arundel, Miss Mahan. 

336. Elements of Regional Geography 

Description and analysis of the major regions of the world with par- 
ticular emphasis upon human settlement and the use of the lands. Pre- 
requisite, Geography 335 or 211-212. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel, Mr. Phillips. 



Department of German 135 

339. Geography of Latin America 

A study of the physical, economic, political, and social background 
of Latin America, showing present conditions and possibilities of future 
development, with emphasis on the relation of Latin America to the 
United States. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Phillips. 

341. Geography of Europe 

An analysis of the influences of climate, surface features, and nat- 
ural resources on the distribution of peoples, their industries and routes 
of trade. Consideration will be given to each country within its regional 
setting and to the relationship of Europe to the remainder of the world. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Phillips. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

345. Geography of Anglo- America 

A regional study emphasizing the relationships that exist between 
the natural environment and the human activities in each of the geo- 
graphic regions of Anglo-America. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Arundel. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Assistant Professor William R. Barrett (Head of the 
Department) ; Lecturer Madie W. Barrett. 

Students who do not offer any German for entrance will take Ger- 
man 101-102. Students offering two and three units of German will 
take German 103-104 or 205-206, according to ability. 

Not all courses from 205 to 401 will be given in any one year; a se- 
lection meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of the students 
will be made. 

101-102. Elementary German 

Essentials of grammar, graded reading, vocabulary building. Three 
hour 8 for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett, Mrs. 
Barrett. 

103-104. Intermediate German 

First semester, reading of a classic (Schiller's Wilhelm Tell or its 
equivalent). Second semester, rapid reading in the lyric and short story. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett, Mrs. 
Barrett. 



136 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

205-206. Introduction to German Literature: The Classical Period 

Representative works in prose and verse. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

209-210. Scientific and Technical German 

German readings in chemistry, physics, zoology, botany, geology. 

At the discretion of the instructor, this course may be taken instead 
of German 103-104. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Barrett. 

211. Elementary Composition and Conversation 

This course may be pursued with German 103 as a sophomore elec- 
tive. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

212. Advanced Conversation 

This course may be pursued with German 10U as a sophomore elec- 
tive. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

301r. History of the German Language 

History of the sounds and inflections of the modern idiom from the 
beginnings. Development of the lexicon. Prerequisite, two years of col- 
lege German or the equivalent. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barrett. 

315-316. Brief History of German Literature 

A study of the literary movements and of individual authors from 
early times to the present. Majors are required to take this course col- 
laterally with German 317-318. One hour for the year. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

317-318. Survey of German Literature 

A study of literary works, and excerpts from works representing 
the various movements of German literature from early times to the 
present. Majors are required to take this course collaterally with Ger- 
man 815-316. Prerequisite, at least two years of college German or the 
equivalent. Two hours for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

321-322. Goethe's Life and Selected Works 

A study of the various periods of Goethe's literary activity; read- 
ing of works illustrating different periods of his development. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

325, 326. German Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

A study of selected works of representative writers, particularly in 
the fields of the drama and the novel. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 



Department of Health 137 

329r. German Classics in English 

A general-culture course designed to acquaint the non-specialist stu- 
dent with representative works of German literature. Lectures and 
discussions on works assigned and on the literary movements from 
medieval times to the present. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barrett. 

331. Lessing and His Time 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 

332. Schiller's Life and Selected Works 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barrett. 

401r. Goethe's "Faust" 

Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barrett. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Medical Division: Dr. Collings (Head of the Depart- 
ment) , Dr. Deane, Dr. Garrard. 

Instruction Division: Associate Professors Schriver 
(Head of Instruction Division), Harris; Assistant Professors 
Shamburger, Garfield. 

101r. Health 

A course designed to place before each student the ideal of a well- 
balanced program for daily living and to emphasize her obligation to 
serve society by the promotion of individual, family, and public health. 
Required of all freshmen except those in the home economics course. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Schriver, Miss Harris, 
Miss Shamburger, Miss Garfield. 

103r. Health 

A study of the basic principles of health maintenance and promo- 
tion. Required of all one-year commercial students. Two hours. Miss 
Harris, Miss Garfield. 

234. Community Health 

A study of the broadening scope of community health, the attack of 
official and voluntary agencies upon major health problems, and the re- 
sponsibility of the individual in the community health program. Pre- 
requisite, Health 101 or its equivalent. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harris. 



138 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

236. First Aid 

Presentation of the American Red Cross Standard Course in First 
Aid leading to certification for those who qualify. Required of majors in 
physical education and in recreation. One hour, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Schriver, Miss Garfield. 

338. Safety and First Aid 

A study of factual information, desirable attitudes and behavior in 
safety matters, including the principles essential to safety in the home, 
school, camp, and community. Presentation of the American Red Cross 
first aid instructor training course leading to certification as instructor 
for those who qualify. Teaching of first aid in community adult groups 
is emphasized. Prerequisite, Health 101 or its equivalent. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.50. Miss Schriver, 
Miss Garfield. 

341r. Elementary School Health 

Consideration given to problems relevant to desirable health prac- 
tices. Selection and organization of materials, methods of instruction, 
and the use of modern communications media are stressed. Required of 
majors in elementary and gram/mar-grade education. Prerequisites, 
Health 101, Education, one course, and Biology 101-102 or Chemistry 
101-102 or 10S-10U- Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Schriver. 

364. Medical Information for Social Workers 

Medical background for social case work. A survey of modern 
methods of medical diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on 
diseases likely to be encountered by the social worker. Restricted to 
students specializing in the field of case work. Open to others only by 
special permission. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Dr. Collings. 

367. Secondary School and College Health 

Consideration given to materials, techniques of teaching, co-ordina- 
tion of health with other subjects, and with health specialists. Emphasis 
is given to program planning, problem-centered teaching, and the use of 
modern communications media. Required of juniors in the Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education course. Prerequisites, Health 101, Edu- 
cation, one course, and Biology 101-102 or Chemistry 101-102 or 108- 
10 Jf.. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Schriver. 

369. Child Health 

A study of growth and development as related to the health of chil- 
dren from prenatal life through adolescence. Consideration is given to 
meeting physical, emotional, and social needs in the care of children. 
Prerequisite, Health 101 or Biology 277. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Harris. 



Department of History and Political Science 139 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Gullander, x Pfaff, Largent, Draper; Asso- 
ciate Professors Alexander (Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment), ^ardolph; Assistant Professors Hege, Hocker, 
iO'BoYLE, Parker, Tindall, Edinger; Instructors Graves, 
Beeler. 

101-102. Modern European History 

A study of the development of major ideas, movements, and insti- 
tutions in the history of Europe since 1500, with backgrounds in ancient 
and medieval Europe and significance in the world today. For fresh- 
men. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Fee, 60 
cents each semester. Staff. 

105r. Contemporary History 

A survey of problems of current interest, emphasizing causes of 
conflict between nations and social and economic problems of present- 
day American life. Magazines and newspapers will serve as texts. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Fee, $2.00. Mr. Parker. 

211. The United States to 1865 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of the 
period. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Draper, Miss Largent, Mr. Graves, Mr. Tindall. 

212. The United States since 1865 

A continuation of 211. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Draper, Miss Largent, Mr. Graves, Mr. Tindall. 

21 3r. The United States since 1865 

Special emphasis will be placed upon the economic development of 
the United States during this period and its effect upon the position of 
the United States in world affairs. Designed primarily for majors in 
Business Education; elective for others who have not had History 212. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hege. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All elective courses numbered "200" require one year of history as 
prerequisite except by permission of the head of the department. All 
elective courses numbered "300" require one year of history and junior 
or senior standing except by permission of the head of the department 
and the instructor concerned. 



'On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



140 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

337. The American Colonies 

A study of the political, economic, and intellectual development of 
the English colonies, with particular attention to the colonial begin- 
nings and expansion of Southern life. The growth of slavery, staple 
agriculture, and sectional politics will be traced to the time of the 
Missouri Compromise. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Tindall. 

338. Latin-American History 

A survey of the social, economic, and political development of the 
Latin-American republics. Special attention will be given to the rela- 
tions of these countries to the United States. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Parker. 

347. History of the South 

An interpretation of the political, economic, social, and cultural 
forces in the evolution of the South since 1820, with major emphasis 
on the New South and contemporary regional problems. The South 
will be studied in both its relationship and contrast to national develop- 
ment. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Tindall. 

348. History of the United States since 1918 

Selected topics in the political, economic, and cultural history of the 
United States since World War I. Prerequisite, History 212 or 213, ex- 
cept by permission of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hege. 

349. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States to 1865 

An historical view of the development of American society, with 
emphasis on the life of the people, and the influence of changing re- 
ligious, intellectual, aesthetic, literary, social, and economic currents. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bardolph. 

(Not offered 1952-1953.) 

350. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States since 1865 

A continuation of History 349, but designed also for those who wish 
to take the course separately. Emphasis will be placed on the emergence 
of modern American life and its most insistent problems, together with 
the economic, social, legal, intellectual, and aesthetic currents that have 
given them direction. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Bardolph. 

(Not offered 1952-1953.) 

353. Ancient Civilization 

A survey of the Ancient World with particular attention to the 
political and cultural development of Greece and Rome. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Beeler 






Department of History and Political Science 141 

354. Medieval Civilization 

A survey of Europe in the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the cul- 
tural aspects of medieval civilization and the beginning of modern 
states. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Beeler. 

355. The Renaissance 

A study of the background, causes, and progress of the intellectual 
and cultural movement in Europe in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and six- 
teenth centuries. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Draper. 

356. The Reformation 

The study of the Reformation period in European history. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Draper. 

361. The Age of Absolutism 

A survey of the Age of Louis XIV and the Old Regime. Emphasis 
will be placed upon French development as typical of Europe and upon 
the perfection of absolutism in government and the beginning of lib- 
eralism in thought. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Largent. 

368. The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era 

A study of the struggle for social, economic, and political democracy 
during the Revolution and the advancement or negation of progress 
toward these goals under Napoleon. The pattern of dictatorship as 
established in France and elsewhere in Europe will also be considered. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Largent. 

369. Europe in the Nineteenth Century 

Emphasis will be placed upon social, cultural, and intellectual his- 
tory. Works of leading thinkers will be read and discussed. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hocker. 

370. Europe in the Twentieth Century 

A continuation of History 369, but may be taken separetly. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hocker. 

373. England from Ancient Times to 1600 

A survey of origins and evolution of English culture. Emphasis on 
economic, social, and intellectual life, with some consideration of poli- 
tical institutions. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Gullander. 

374. England from 1600 to the Present 

A continuation of History 373. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Gullander. 



142 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



376. Russia since 1815 

A survey of recent Russian history designed to give the student an 
understanding of contemporary Russia. Approximately one-third of 
the course will be devoted to the period since 1917. Main emphasis 
will be placed on social and political institutions and on foreign policy, 
particularly in the Near East. Some time will be spent on economic 
development and on Communist theory. Prerequisites, History 101-102. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
O'Boyle. 

(Not offered 1952-1953.) 

382. Far Eastern Civilization 

A general survey of the historical development of China and Japan. 
The native cultures and institutions of these countries will be studied 
as a background for the impact of Western Civilization upon the Orient 
and the conflict of rival imperialisms preceding World War II. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hocker. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



POLITICAL SCIENCES 

321. The Federal Government 

A study of the government of the United States. Origin, organiza- 
tion, and development will be emphasized. Special attention will be 
given to government in action and to administration. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander, Mr. Edinger. 

322. State and Local Government 

A continuation of Political Science 321 with attention paid to the 
same functions of government in the state and local fields. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. 

324. World Politics 

In this course a survey will be made of the development of the world 
state system. International law, diplomatic relations, power politics, 
and efforts to achieve world organization will be studied. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. 

327. American Political Parties 

A study of the development and organization of political parties. 
Special attention will be given to campaigns, elections, and political 
machines. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Alexander. 



^Political science courses are counted as history on the maximum but not on the 
minimum requirements for a major in history. 



Department of Mathematics 143 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Barton (Head of the Department), Watkins; 
Assistant Professors Lewis, Grogan, Walker. 

MATHEMATICS 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 101-102 or 103- 
104, are 217, 218, 305, 325, 327, 337, 450. 

Students who expect to major in mathematics are urged by the de- 
partment to take Mathematics 101-102; others, including those prepar- 
ing for the sciences, are advised to take Mathematics 103-104. Those 
who plan to use mathematics as their second teaching subject should 
take Mathematics 217, 218, and additional courses to meet requirements. 

101-102. Algebra and Plane Trigonometry 

Algebra, three hours, first semester. Plane Trigonometry, three 
hours, second semester. Planned for freshmen expecting to major in 
mathematics. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

103-104. Introduction to College Mathematics 

College algebra, with the elements of plane analytic geometry and 
an introduction to the differential calculus, three hours, first semester. 
Plane trigonometry, three hours, second semester. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss Watkins, Miss Lewis, Miss Grogan, Miss Walker. 

105-106. General Mathematics, with Applications to Business 

An elementary course planned specifically for those taking the Busi- 
ness Education course. Students taking the B.A. course will be admitted 
only with special permission from the head of the department. It in- 
cludes a review of high-school algebra, followed by such topics as graphs, 
progressions, logarithms, binomial theorem, simple and compound in- 
terest, elementary life insurance, annuities, statistical concepts. Can- 
not be used as the prerequisite for Mathematics 217. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

217. Analytic Geometry 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-104. or the equivalent. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

218. Introduction to the Calculus 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

305. Solid and Spherical Geometry 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Walker. 



144 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

320. College Geometry 

A rapid review of high-school geometry, followed by a study of the 
modern geometry of the triangle and circle. Prerequisites, Mathmatics 
101-102 or 103-10 U and approval of the instructor. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 

325. Advanced Algebra and Theory of Equations 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

327. Differential and Integral Calculus 

A continuation of Mathematics 218. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

328. Advanced Analytic Geometry 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 218. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

337. History of Mathematics 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 217. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

1341. Statistical Methods I 

An introductory course in elementary statistical methods. Designed 
especially for students in other departments who are interested in the 
fundamental principles of statistical methods. Such topics as the col- 
lection, classification, tabular and graphic representation of data; rates, 
ratios and percentages; the analysis of frequency distributions; re- 
liability and tests of significance and simple linear correlation will be 
treated. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Watkins. 

342. Statistical Methods II 

An extension of the methods developed in the introductory course. 
Such topics as rank correlation; multiple and partial correlation; con- 
tingency and tests of independence; simple index numbers; time series 
and sampling will be treated. Prerequisite, Mathematics 341. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

430. Advanced Calculus 

An extension of the concepts developed in the elementary calculus 
to functions of more than one variable. A study of partial derivatives, 
multiple integrals with their applications; also some elementary work 
in the solution of differential equations. Prerequisite, Mathematics 327 
or the equivalent. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Barton. 



^his course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



Department of Mathematics 145 

432. Differential Equations 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 327. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

Required of all mathematics majors in the senior year. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

Other courses will be offered upon request. 

ASTRONOMY 

lOlr. Introduction to Astronomy 

An elementary appreciation course designed to enlarge the student's 
horizon and to give her a permanent and enjoyable out-of-door interest. 
Although the course lays emphasis upon the constellations and their 
stories and upon the bodies in the solar system, it also attempts to give 
the student some sense of the universe as a vast and ordered whole, 
and of our place in this universe. A three-inch telescope and a small 
electrically-driven planetarium are used for demonstration purposes. 
Designed primarily as a freshman elective. Three hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Lewis. 

310. Elementary Descriptive Astronomy 

An outline of the basic facts in astronomy and its history, with 
constellation study. Designed for those interested in the cultural side 
of science and for prospective teachers of general science and geography. 
This course has no prerequisite in college mathematics and cannot be 
used to fulfill the science requirements for graduation. Elective for 
juniors and seniors and approved sophomores. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 

312. Descriptive Astronomy 

The practical work includes constellation study, exercises with the 
celestial globe, and elementary observation with field glass and small 
telescope. This course may be used toward a major or minor in mathe- 
matics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-104.. Two recitations 
and one two-hour period for laboratory and observational work, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Walker. 



146 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Visiting Professor 1 Procter (Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment) ; Associate Professor 2 Ashby (Head of the Depart- 
ment) . 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

321r. Ethics 

An analysis of the nature of ethics; a critical survey of the major 
Western ethical systems; development of an ethical theory by the stu- 
dent; and an examination of some contemporary problems. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ashby, Mr. Procter. 

322. Aesthetics 

Definition and analysis of the aesthetic experience and art; the 
categories of art (form, matter, content) as exemplified in the six ma- 
jor art-media; and study of the problems and theory of art-criticism. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ashby. 

323. Philosophy of Religion 

A study of philosophic interpretations of religion with major atten- 
tion given to significant problems in contemporary religions of Western 
civilization. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Ashby, Mr. Procter. 

324. Logic 

Examination of the fundamentals of sound thinking; the elements of 
deductive reasoning; the function of language in thought; the principles 
and procedures of the scientific method. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ashby. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

345, 346. Plato and Aristotle 

Brief study of the Pre-Socratics leading to Plato's dialogues. Study 
for the appreciation of Plato's important insights into the nature of 
man and the universe. Aristotle's physics, psychology, and ethics studied 
as illustrative of his general metaphysics. Three hours, each semester. 
Credit, three hours each semester. Mr. Procter. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

349. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 

Ethics, theories of knowledge, and metaphysics in the ancient and 
medieval periods. Readings in the principal writings of Plato, Aristotle, 
the Stoics, Augustine, and Aquinas. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Ashby, Mr. Procter. 



^or 1952-1953. 

2 On leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



Department of Physical Education 147 

350. History of Modern Philosophy 

A survey of modern philosophical thought, Descartes to Dewey. May 
be taken with or without Philosophy 3U9. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ashby, Mr. Procter. 

370. The Social Ethics of Democracy 

After a review of the historical ethical bases of democracy, there 
will be consideration of the contemporary American ethos and social 
problems. Emphasis will be given to the methods of constructing an 
ethical theory and to research in and discussion of the implications of 
various ethical theories for specific problems. Prerequisites, one course 
in philosophy and History 211, 212, or Sociology 211, 212, 321, or per- 
mission of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Ashby. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

590. Aesthetics 

The student will be responsible for reading and critical reports of 
the major philosophies of art, the construction of an aesthetic theory, 
the detailed analysis of the artistic categories of the art-media in which 
the student is doing creative work, and the development of a theory of 
criticism. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Ashby. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Martus (Head of the Department) ; Associate 
Professors Davis, Moomaw; Assistant Professors Griffin, 
Leonard, Greene, Burdett; Instructors Park, Wolfe, Hen- 
nis, Jacobs, Van Dyke, Luttgens, Porter, Bibza ; Graduate 
Assistants Johnston, Mason, Saltzseider, Stohlman, Van 
Dyke. 

Physical education is required of all students during the freshman 
and sophomore years, and of all commercial students. Not more than 
two semesters of any one activity may be presented for credit. 

Freshmen Year: Physical education assignments for new students 
are based on their previous experience in physical education and on the 
record of their physical and medical examinations. These assignments 
are from the courses listed below. 

Sophomore Year: A wide range of choice in the courses listed is 
allowed qualified students. 



148 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES FOR FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 

121, Badminton; 123, Softball; 125, Basketball and Softball; 127, Be- 
ginning Golf; 129, Gymnastics; 130, Field Hockey; 131, Recreational 
Sports; 135, Soccer; 137, Speedball; 139, Fieldball and Basketball; 142, 
Social Dance; 143, Folk Dance; 145, Beginning Modern Dance; 147, 
Square Dance; 149, Tap Dance; 151, Beginning Swimming; 161, Begin- 
ning Tennis; 163, Volleyball; 220, Archery; 227, Intermediate Golf; 228, 
Advanced Golf; 245, Intermediate Modern Dance; 248, English and 
American Country Dance; 252, Intermediate Swimming (Lower); 254, 
Intermediate Swimming (Upper) ; 256, Advanced Swimming; 258, Life 
Saving; 262, Intermediate Tennis; 264, Boating and Canoeing; 266, 
Bowling. 

Note: Not more than two semesters of any one activity may be pre- 
sented for credit. Beginning golf is taught on the College course; clubs 
may be rented at a nominal sum. Balls must be furnished by students. 
For intermediate golf classes taught at the College, students must fur- 
nish their own clubs. 

103. Body Mechanics for the Individual 

Substituted for regular classwork on the advice of the college physi- 
cian and the head of the department. Students are given individual 
exercise programs based on their particular needs. Those who are under 
the care of an orthopedist may carry out under supervision special pro- 
grams in the swimming pool or corrective gymnasium. May be elected 
by freshmen, sophomores, juniors, or seniors. Miss Luttgens, Miss Wolfe. 

105. Modified Activities 

Substituted for regular classwork on the advice of the college physi- 
cian and the head of the department, for those students for whom a 
program of light activities is recommended. Recreational activities are 
adapted to the needs of the group. Miss Luttgens. 

106. Rest 

107. Physical Education for Commercial Students 

Choice of one of the following activities: swimming, folk and social 
dancing, recreational games. Required of all commercial students. Two 
hours for one semester. Miss Wolfe, Miss Luttgens, Miss Burdett. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

241. Playground Organization and Management 

See page 151. 

334. Camp Leadership 

Lectures, discussions, observations, and required readings on camp 
programs, camp organizations and administration, and the place of 



Department of Physical Education 149 

camping in the educational program. Open to juniors and seniors who 
can present adequate skills and interests in such camp activities as 
music, dramatics, crafts, sports, etc. One hour, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Leonard. 

336. Advanced Modern Dance 

Open only to students who have completed two semesters of the 
Modern Dance or who can demonstrate the necessary skill. Two hours, 
each semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Moomaw. 

337. Life Saving and Waterfront Supervision 

Open only to students who can present the requisite skill in swim- 
ming. Designed for students interested in camp counselorships and sum- 
mer recreational programs. Two hours, second semester. Credit, one se- 
mester hour. Miss Porter. 

338. Sports Organization and Management; Tennis 

Designed especially for recreation leaders, camp counselors, high- 
school teachers, and social workers. Fundamentals of coaching and 
standards of tournament play with emphasis on the values of health 
protection and ethics of sportsmanship. Open to juniors and seniors 
who pass elementary skills test. One hour, second semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Miss Davis. 

339. Sports Organization and Management; Volleyball and Basketball 

Adapted to meet the needs of recreation leaders, high-school teachers, 
and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching and officiating in team 
sports. Open to juniors and seniors who meet the skill requirements. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Greene. 

340. Sports Organization and Management; Recreational Sports 
and Softball 

Adapted to meet the needs of recreation leaders, high-school teachers, 
and camp counselors. Fundamentals of coaching and officiating in team 
sports and organization and management of recreational games. Open 
to juniors and seniors who meet the skill requirements. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Greene. 

341r. Principles and Procedures in Physical Education 

Integration of principles in general education and Physical Educa- 
tion Curriculum for Grades I to VI. Required by the State Department 
of Public Instruction for elementary teachers' certificates. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Leonard, Miss Burdett. 

342r. Folk and Country Dance 

A study of national characteristics of music, costumes, dances, and 
folk arts. Designed for the high-school teacher, community worker, or 
recreation leader. Open to juniors and seniors. Two hours. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Burdett. 



150 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

343. Festivals for School and Community 

A study of traditional folk festivals and their adaptation to school 
and community use. Each student is required to write one festival based 
on the semester's study. The student should have had one semester in 
folk dance. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss 
Burdett. 

344r. Community Recreation 

A study of the organization and administration of programs in com- 
munity recreation, with observation and practice in group leadership in 
the local community centers and playgrounds. Designed especially for 
recreation leaders, camp counselors, girl scout executives, and com- 
munity workers. Open to juniors and seniors. Two lecture hours, three 
laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Davis. 

345. Elementary Dance Composition 

See page 152. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition 

See page 152. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance 

See page 152. 

355. Applied Dance 

See page 153. 

356. Applied Dance 

See page 153. 



PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The department offers graduate and undergraduate courses leading 
to the Bachelor's and Master's degrees. 

In co-operation with the Department of Sociology, the Department 
offers work leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Recreational Lead- 
ership. See page 69. 

The Departments of Art, Physical Education (Dance), and English 
(Drama) offer the interdepartmental major in Creative Arts leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree. See page 68. 

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with a ma- 
jor in Physical Education is based on the study of the natural sciences, 
social sciences, and health. Courses in the humanities are required to 
insure the cultural background essential to women who hope to hold 
positions in this field of education. At the beginning of the junior year, 
the professional student in physical education may choose a program 



Department of Physical Education 151 

emphasizing teacher education, dance education, recreation in physical 
education, or corrective physical education. The teacher education and 
dance education sequences include courses in Education and Psychology 
required for a Grade A secondary-school teaching certificate. 

No student is permitted to enter upon or to continue the work of the 
professional course if in the judgment of the college physician her phy- 
sical condition renders it inadvisable. 

For the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with a ma- 
jor in Physical Education, see page 73. 

Graduate work is offered leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree 
with a graduate major in dance and also the Master of Education de- 
gree with a major in Physical Education. Graduate minors may be 
taken in Creative Arts or in work offered by the Departments of Art, 
English, Education, Music, or Physical Education. In co-operation with 
the School of Education, graduate work leading to the degree of Master 
of Arts in Education is offered through courses in both the regular 
sessions or the summer sessions at the Woman's College Center of the 
Graduate School of the University of North Carolina. 

See also Graduate School. 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

111-112. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities 

Field hockey, soccer, swimming, gymnastics, stunts, modern dance, 
tennis, Softball. Required of all freshmen taking Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Education. Six hours, each semester. Miss Griffin, Miss Lutt- 
gens, Miss Moomaw, Miss Leonard, Miss Davis, Miss Greene. 

211-212. Theory and Practice in Selected Activities 

Soccer, fieldball, speedball, volleyball, tap and social dancing, swim- 
ming, modern dance, basketball, folk dance, archery, golf. Required of 
sophomores taking Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. Six hours, 
first semester; seven hours, second semester. Miss Griffin, Miss Leonard, 
Miss Moomaw, Miss Porter, Miss Greene, Miss Wolfe, Miss Van Dyke. 

241. Playground Organization and Management 

The construction and equipment of school and community play- 
grounds ; scout organization and leadership ; techniques of teaching play- 
ground games, lead-up games to team sports, stunts, and relays. Re- 
quired of sophomores taking Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Burdett. 



152 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

345. Elementary Dance Composition 

Includes the study of the rhythmic and musical bases of dance, the 
elements of art and theatre in the structure of dances. Required of 
juniors emphasizing Dance Education and open to students who have 
satisfactorily completed Intermediate Modern Dance. One lecture hour 
and two one and one-half hour laboratories, first semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

346. Intermediate Dance Composition 

Includes the study of the historical and anthropological bases of 
dance form from primitive through modern times. Required of juniors 
emphasizing Dance Education and open to students who have completed 
Physical Education 3U5 or who have special permission of the instructor. 
One lecture hour and two one and one-half hour laboratories, second se- 
mester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

348. The Dance Curriculum 

Evaluating and grading dance materials. Teaching methods in mod- 
ern dance, folk, tap, American country, and social dance. The adminis- 
tration of the dance curriculum and the organization and problems of 
the dance production. Required of juniors emphasizing Dance Educa- 
tion. Two lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Moomaw. 

351. Principles of Physical Education 

Integration of principles in general education and physical education. 
Survey of aim and objectives of physical education, general methods 
in education and their application to the teaching of physical education. 
Required of juniors. Two lecture and three laboratory hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Martus. 

352. The Curriculum in Physical Education 

Construction of modern programs in physical education. Study of 
state and city programs. Survey of standard tests of motor ability and 
achievements with adaptation of these to the school program. Required 
of juniors in teacher education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Martus. 

354. History and Theory of the Dance 

The history and motivation of dance from primitive through present 
times. Study of theories of leading dancers from the beginning of 
theatrical dance through modern times. Required of seniors emphasiz- 
ing Dance Education and open to juniors and seniors as an elective. 
Two lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Moomaw. 



Department of Physical Education 153 

355. Applied Dance 

A co-ordinating course designed to increase skill in technique and 
the use of related art materials. Prerequisite, two semesters of Modern 
Dance or permission based upon demonstrated ability. Open to juniors 
and seniors. One hour lecture, three hours laboratory, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

356. Applied Dance 

A continuation of the first semester course in which more skill and 
maturity in the selection and the use of materials are expected. Open 
to juniors and seniors who have completed Physical Education S55. One 
hour lecture, three hours laboratory, second semester. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Moomaw. 

359-360. Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical Education 
Activities 

Folk dancing, tennis, marching, gymnastics, apparatus, modern 
dance, English country dance, child rhythms, singing games, story plays, 
basketball, field hockey, soccer, baseball, archery. Opportunity for of- 
ficiating in team and individual sports and procedures for the organiza- 
tion of field days, sports days, and play days, festivals. Required of 
juniors. Six hours, first semester; eight hours, second semester. Credit, 
four semester hours. Miss Martus, Miss Davis, Miss Luttgens, Miss Grif- 
fin, Miss Leonard, Miss Moomaw, Miss Van Dyke. 

376. Kinesiology 

The human bones, joints, and muscles concerned with physical exer- 
cises; the mechanical conditions under which these work; the manner 
in which they enter into the co-ordinate movements of life and of gym- 
nastics and sports. Special emphasis on the application of these prin- 
ciples to the solution of problems of posture and deformities. Required 
of juniors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Luttgens. 

434. Camp Leadership 

In June of the junior year, professional students in physical educa- 
tion are required to attend a three-week camp period at the Recreation 
Association camp, located in the Battleground area. During this sum- 
mer camp program, the student must successfully pass work in the fol- 
lowing activities: practical camp leadership, volleyball coaching and of- 
ficiating, waterfront supervision, swimming methods, recreational sports, 
boating and canoeing. The student is given instruction in activities 
which can be adapted for use in camps, in practical problems of camp- 
ing, and in camp counseling. No academic credit is given for this work, 
but the satisfactory completion of all work is necessary before the stu- 
dent can enter the senior year in physical education. Miss Leonard, 
Miss Wolfe. 



154 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

449. Seminar in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

The course is designed to co-ordinate the work of the student and to 
serve as a guide in the co-ordination of interpretations, philosophy, and 
understandings in modern physical education. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Martus. 

461-462. Directed Teaching 

Technique of teaching health and physical education under super- 
vision. Regular observation and teaching in all departments of the 
Curry School, county schools, and college service program. Required of 
seniors. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Martus and staff. 

464. Organization and Administration of Physical Education 

A study of the organization of departments of physical education in 
secondary schools and colleges, with comprehensive plans for modern 
gymnasia. The class also studies the co-operation of departments of 
health, physical education, and recreation. Required, of seniors in 
Teacher Education. Two lecture hours, second semester. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Miss Martus. 

465. Body Mechanics 

Lectures and clinical practice in exercise for the individual with 
special reference to correction of spine and foot deformities. Required 
of seniors. Two lecture hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Luttgens. 

468. Evaluation and Measurement in Physical Education 

Survey of tests and the application of measurement in physical edu- 
cation. Elementary testing procedures. Two hours, second semester 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Hennis. 

469-470. Advanced Techniques and Teaching Methods in Physical 
Education 

Modern dance, golf, handball, squash, fencing, bowling, sports coach- 
ing, and officiating. This course includes assisting in college classes in 
physical education and officiating in physical education activities of the 
College and community. Electives are open in handicraft, scouting, golf, 
riding, and canoeing. Required of seniors. Five hours for the year. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Moomaw, Miss Griffin, Miss Leonard, 
Miss Hennis, Staff. 

476. Problems Seminar 

A general survey of current problems in the field of physical educa- 
tion. The course will provide an opportunity for the student to specialize 
in a problem of her choice. The emphasis of the problem shall be in 
dance, body mechanics, recreation, or teacher education. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Leonard and the staff. 



Department of Physical Education 155 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

Gymnasium Costume 

Every student in the regular college courses must provide herself 
with a regulation gymnasium outfit as follows: 

Two washable suits $10.00 

Regulation Shoes 3.00 

Two pairs hose 1.60 

Coat sweater 2.85 

A combination lock must be rented by each student. 

Students in the Commercial course are not required to purchase uni- 
forms before registration. 

Gymnasium suits must be secured after the student comes to college 
from dealers who handle the uniform adopted and required by the De- 
partment of Physical Education. 

No swimming suit except a regulation cotton suit may be worn in 
the swimming pool. This suit must be secured through the Department 
of Physical Education. The suit is laundered by the College after each 
swimming period. The cost for the use of this suit is one dollar for the 
year. Students using the pool must also have bathing shoes and cap. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

520. Rhythmic Analysis 

Development of the ability to analyze complex forms and devices 
and to evaluate them for dance purposes. Three semester hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

521. Administration of the Dance Curriculum 

Curriculum planning on all grade levels in all types of dance. Re- 
view of principles, aim, objectives and methods of teaching dance. A 
study of the problems of equipment and facilities, of administration and 
organization of the dance production. Open to advanced undergraduates. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Moomaw. 

522. Anthropological Bases of Dance 

A study of the dances of the primitives and developed cultures. Folk, 
court dances, and ballet as expressions of social forms and cultures. 
Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 



156 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

523. Dance of the Twentieth Century 

Developments and trends of the various types of dance; their rela- 
tionship to older social forms and cultures; to developments in the 
other arts today and to our present-day social patterns. Open to those 
who have completed Physical Education 522 or by permission of the in- 
structor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Moomaw. 

524. Survey of Contemporary Dances 

A study of the personal approaches and techniques as illustrative of 
the theories of leading modern dancers. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

553. Organization and Administration of Recreation 

A study and general survey of programs in recreation, with special 
emphasis on the problems which arise in planning the program. Students 
who take Physical Education 3UU will not receive credit for Physical 
Education 553. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours, 

557. The Adapted Program in Physical Education 

A survey of the need of an adapted program in physical education. 
The development of related problems with special emphasis on the physi- 
cal examination, medical forms, various methods of organizing the 
physical examination, and constructing units for teaching body me- 
chanics at different age levels. Open to advanced undergraduates and 
graduates. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 

516. Problems in Organiaztion and Administration 

Problems in organization and administration of physical education 
for the advanced student. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Martus. 

517. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports 

Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis on sea- 
sonal activity. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Griffin. 

518. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports 

Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis on sea- 
sonal activity. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Griffin. 

530. Recreational Crafts 

Organization of a craft's program and practical experience in the 
use of various craft materials. Offered at camp. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Hennis. 



Department of Physical Education 157 

531. Leadership, Organization, and Administration for Camping 

A course designed primarily for those interested in camp adminis- 
tration. Offered at camp. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Leonard. 

549. Seminar in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

The course is designed to co-ordinate the work of the graduate stu- 
dent and to serve as a guide in the co-ordination of advanced interpreta- 
tions, philosophy, and understandings in modern physical education. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Martus. 

568. Evaluation and Measurement in Physical Education 

Survey of tests and the application of measurement to physical edu- 
cation; methods of administering tests and using data. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Hennis. 

576. Problems Seminar 

A general survey on the graduate level of current problems in the 
field of physical education. The course will provide an opportunity for 
the student to develop a problem in the area of her choice. The em- 
phasis of the problem shall be in dance, or body mechanics, or recrea- 
tion, or sports in teacher education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Leonard and staff. 

563. The History of Physical Education 

The historical development of physical education, with special em- 
phasis on the educational philosophies of the outstanding leaders of 
each era, and the influences of these philosophies on current practices 
in physical education. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Burdett. 

571. Problems in Body Mechanics 

A survey of orthopedic defects and kinesiological analysis of cor- 
rective measures which can be used by the teacher of the adapted 
physical education program. Observation of orthopedic defects and 
clinical observations. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Luttgens. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

511. Introduction to Research in Physical Education 

A study of the various methods and techniques used in research. 
Methods of preparing bibliographies, of selecting and defining prob- 
lems. Outlining a research project. Required of all graduate students in 
the MEd program. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Hennis. 



158 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

512. Research Seminar 

The conducting and reporting of a research problem in physical 
education. Required of all graduate students in the MEd program. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hennis. 

513. Advanced Principles and Philosophy of Physical Education 

Integration and application of principles in general education and 
physical education as foundations for the development of a practical 
philosophy of modern physical education. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hennis. 

514. Professional Literature 

Basic literature and current readings in the various areas of physical 
education. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Burdett. 

515. Visual Aids in Physical Education 

Survey of materials available, and use of visual aids in teaching sit- 
uations. Problem in developing a visual aid project. Two hours, first 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Griffin. 

585. Choreography for Solo and Duet Dances 

Problems in pre-classic and modern form to include the study of 
music suitable for these forms, their qualities and time-space charac- 
teristics. Emphasis will be placed on student evaluation and develop- 
ment of aesthetic standards. Prerequisite, the completion of the equiva- 
lent of nine semester hours of dance or the permission of the instructor. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

586. Choreography for Large Groups and Long Dances 

Choreography based upon the projection of an idea or mood with 
careful selection of the proper music, use of line, space and time require- 
ments. A laboratory in dance production for practice and experiment. 
Prerequisite, Physical Education 585 or the equivalent. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

590. Experimentation and Analysis 

Experimentation and analysis of the utilization of contemporary 
theories of dance and the graphic arts. Designed to meet the needs of 
and confined to election by those graduate students who are not dance 
majors. Elective for those students who are considered to have a back- 
ground in dance sufficiently broad to make the contents of the course 
intelligible to them. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Moomaw. 

591-592-593. Thesis 

A concert of the student's own choreography. In the presentation, 
use may be made of another dance or dancers, of a musician or both. 



Department op Physics 159 

The student must select her music, design the stage decor, and supervise 
the execution. She must plan the lighting and give all instructions for 
curtains, light, and stage crews. The thesis shall have two parts: (I) the 
creative work, which must demonstrate the mastery of technique and 
of scholarship of the dance; and (2) the scholarly paper, which must 
demonstrate a power of generalization resting on solid methodology. 
Required of all MFA students. Six semester hours. Miss Moomaw. 

594. Thesis 

The writing of a thesis. Graduate students with approved thesis 
subjects may register for this course. Credit may be divided between 
two semesters. Credit, two semester hours. Thesis adviser. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor Reardon (Head of the Department) ; Instruc- 
tors Binford, Cox. 

Students who major in physics are advised to take Mathematics 101- 
102 or 103-104 in the freshman year, and a course in general physics 
in the sophomore year. 

101-102. General Physics 

An introduction to the laws and properties of matter, sound, heat, 
light, electricity, and magnetism. Two lecture hours and three lab- 
oratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00 each semester. Miss Reardon, Mr. Binford. 

103-104. General Physics 

A general course first semester on the mechanics of solids, liquids, 
gases, and heat; second semester, electricity and magnetism, sound and 
light. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or 103-104' Two lecture hours 
and three laboratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semester. Miss Reardon. 

1 201r. Elements of Meteorology 

Designed to generalize for the student the facts concerning the 
earth's atmosphere and its weather, and to acquaint the student with 
the physical principles underlying atmospheric phenomena. An elective 
for students interested in their environment, and an introduction to the 
subject for students who are interested in weather as a vocation. Elec- 
tive. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Reardon. 



3 This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



160 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

207-208. General Physics 

A course in special problems. This course combined with Physics 
101-102 or 103-104 will give the student a total of eight semester credits 
in general physics for the year. Open to freshmen with approval of the 
instructor. Prerequisite or co-requisite, Physics 101-102 or 103-10 A. One 
lecture hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Reardon. 

2209r. Photography 

Designed to teach the student the principles of physics involved in 
photography. A foundation for the pursuit of photography as a hobby, 
or for its use as a clinical or research tool, or in the preparation of 
teaching and lecture material. The student must purchase her own films 
and papers. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Reardon. 

211, 212. Experimental Physics 

An advanced course in laboratory technique and manipulation as 
involved in special laboratory problems. Prerequisites, Physics 101-102 
or Physics 103-10b and the approval of the instructor. Three laboratory 
hours for the year. Credit, one hour each semester. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00 each semester. Staff. 

214. Color and Lighting 

The fundamentals of color phenomena and of illumination and their 
applications in the home, in the classroom, on the stage, etc. No pre- 
requisite, but the approval of the department and of the class chairman 
is necessary. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Staff. 

301r. Physics 

Emphasizes those features of physics having greatest application in 
everyday life. Required of the Teacher Training, Foods and Nutrition, 
and Housing majors for the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, 
unless Physics 101-102 is substituted. Open to other students subject 
to the approval of the department and of the class chairman. Two lec- 
ture hours and three laboratory hours. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Reardon. 

305r. Elements of Aeronautics 

A course designed to give students the fundamentals in navigation, 
aerodynamics, meteorology, and aircraft study which are helpful in un- 
derstanding the theory of flight. During the semester the student will 
spend eight hours at the Greensboro-High Point Airport receiving dual 
flying instructions from qualified instructors. The remaining class hours 
will be scheduled on the campus of the Woman's College. Prerequisites, 
Mathematics 101-102 or 103-10 U, Physics 101-102, written permission 
from parents. Flying fee paid to airport. Three lecture hours. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Reardon. 



2 This course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



Department of Physics 161 

3 310. Advanced Photography 

A logical continuation of Physics 209, with special attention to the 
conditions which must be met to portray photographically an original. 
Some work in color films. The student must purchase her own films and 
papers. Prerequisite, Physics 209. One lecture hour and six laboratory 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Miss Reardon. 

320. Sound 

An advanced course in sound, including wave motion, transmission, 
absorption, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction phenomena, 
and practical applications. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 103-104* 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Binford. 

321. Light 

An advanced course in physical optics, including optical instruments, 
spectra, interference phenomena, polarized light, nature of light, absorp- 
tion, and dispersion. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 103-104. Two lec- 
ture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Binford. 

322. Electricity and Magnetism 

An advanced course in electrical and magnetic theories and instru- 
ments, including electron theory, electrolysis, thermo-electricity, electro- 
magnetics, and alternating currents. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 
Physics 103-104. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Reardon. 

323. Heat 

An advanced course in the theory of heat, including thermodynamics, 
molecular physics, quantum theory, and radiations. Prerequisites, 
Physics 101-102 or Physics 103-104 and Mathematics 103-104, or their 
equivalents. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second se- 
mester. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Binford. 

324. Mechanics 

An advanced course in theoretical mechanics, including wave motions, 
gyroscopic actions, dynamics of fluids, and quantum mechanics. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 101-102 or Physics 103-104 and Mathematics 103-104, 
or their equivalents. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. 
Binford. 



^his course cannot be used to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. 



162 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

326. Electronics 

A course mainly in the properties and practical applications of the 
electron, including thermionics, photoelectricity, cathode rays, X-rays, 
and radioactivity. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or Physics 103-101*. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Reardon. 

328. Elements of Radio Communication 

A course of lectures and laboratory work consisting of elementary 
considerations of the fundamental laws and their applications to the 
circuits of modern radio systems. Prerequisite, Physics 101-102 or 
Physics 103-10 U. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Reardon. 

331, 332. Experimental Physics 

A laboratory course which will allow students who have taken Physics 
211 and 212 to continue laboratory work. Prerequisites, Physics 211 
and 212 and two other advanced courses in physics which have been 
completed or are being taken concurrently. Three laboratory hours for 
the year. Credit, one hour each semester. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each 
semester. Staff. 

443-444. X-Ray Technique 

A course in the theory of X-rays and practical experience by each 
student in the making of radiographs in all the more common positions 
using hospital-type equipment; the processing of films and instructions 
in the care, use, and dangers of all types of X-ray equipment. The 
student must purchase her own X-ray films. Prerequisites, Biology 271 
and 372 and Physics 101-102 or 103-10U. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00 each semester. Miss Cox. 

450. Co-ordinating Course: Development of Modern Physics 

A brief survey of fundamental laws in the field of physics and a 
study of the modern theories of matter, electricity, and radiation. Re- 
quired of all seniors majoring in physics. Three lecture hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reardon. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



Department of Psychology 163 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Highsmith (Head of the Department), Duffy; 
Assistant Professors McCutchan, Zimmerman, Eicher, 
Heinlein ; Instructor Mellinger ; Assistants Burgess, Toole. 

For those who wish to major in psychology there are three areas of 
concentration: general, child development, and personnel. Psychology 
211-212 should be taken, if possible, as a basis for these areas. 

211-212. General Psychology (Experimental) 

Designed to present the basic principles and methods of psychology 
as an experimental and natural science. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00 each semester. Miss Duffy, Mr. McCutchan, Mrs. Mellinger, 
Miss Toole. 

221r. General Psychology 

The development of point of view, problems, and methods of psy- 
chology; the fundamental principles necessary for understanding the 
behavior of human beings; the facts and principles of intelligent be- 
havior, motivation, and personality. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Fee, $1.00. Mr. Highsmith, Mrs. Heinlein, Miss Duffy, Mrs. Zim- 
merman, Mr. Eicher, Mrs. Mellinger, Mr. McCutchan. 

222. Educational Psychology 

The psychological facts and principles in learning, study, individual 
differences, and adjustments. Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or the equiv- 
alent. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Fee, 
$1.00. Mr. Highsmith, Mrs. Heinlein, Miss Duffy, Mrs. Zimmerman, 
Mr. Eicher, Mrs. Mellinger, Mr. McCutchan. 

232. Applied Psychology 

A study of the applications of psychology in business, medicine, law, 
politics, religion, and as to its methods of personal adjustment. Special 
attention is given to problems of vocational guidance and individual 
efficiency. Prerequisite, one course in psychology. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Eicher. 

326r. Child Psychology 

A general survey of the development of child behavior. Children of 
different ages will be tested to reveal the status of their development 
in regard to various characteristics of behavior. Emphasis is placed 
upon understanding and dealing practically with the developing person- 
ality of the child. Prerequisite, Psychology 211-212 or 221. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Fee, $1.00. Mrs. Zimmerman. 



164 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

331. Introductory Experimental Design 

An introduction to the design of psychological experiments and the 
treatment and interpretation of data. Prerequisite, six semester hours 
of psychology or approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. McCutchan. 

332. Experimental Psychology 

A presentation of the principles and methods of experimental psy- 
chology. Special attention is given to the relationship of this area to 
other fields of study. Prerequisite, Psychology 331. Two hours and three 
laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
McCutchan. 

333r. Special Problems in Psychology 

An opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups 
on psychological problems of special interest to them. The work may 
represent either a survey of a given field or an intensive investigation 
of a particular problem. The student should consult the instructor be- 
fore registering for this course. Credit, one, two, or three semester 
hours. Staff. 

334r. Special Problems in Psychology 

This course is a continuation of Psychology 333. Prerequisite, Psy- 
chology 333. Credit, one, two, or three semester hours. Staff. 

335. Personnel Psychology 

A course designed for students interested in doing personnel work, 
with emphasis on a study of the organization, problems, and practices 
of personnel administration. Prerequisite, Psychology 211-212 or 221. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Heinlein. 

337r. Mental Measurements 

A study of current methods of measuring mental abilities. Practice 
in the administration and scoring of group and individual tests. Pre- 
requisite, six hours in psychology. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Heinlein. 

340. Measurement in Personnel Work 

The use and construction of tests, and other methods of measurement 
in personnel work. Tests particularly useful in hiring, placing, and pro- 
moting in industry. Prerequisite, Psychology 211-212 or 221. Two lec- 
ture hours and two laboratory hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

341. Abnormal Psychology and Mental Hygiene 

A study of abnormal mental phenomena in their relation to normal 
life, including such topics as sensation; perception; thought, sleep; 
dreams, hypnosis; disassociation ; the psychoneuroses ; personality dis- 
orders, especially of childhood; the fundamental principles of mental 
hygiene. Prerequisite, six hours in psychology. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Mellinger. 



Department of Psychology 165 

342. Psychology of Adolescence 

This course deals with developmental characteristics and problems 
of adolescence. Testing devices for studying developmental trends and 
behavior problems will be stressed. Prerequisite, one course in psychol- 
ogy. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. 
Heinlein. 

343. Experimental Child Psychology 

A survey of approaches and methods in child study, with representa- 
tive studies of children's behavior and development used as illustrative 
material. Each member of the class will be required to help plan and 
carry out at least one research project. Prerequisites, Psychology 211- 
212 or equivalent, Psychology S26 or equivalent. First semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Heinlein. 

344. Advanced Educational Psychology 

Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Three semester hours. Mr. 
Highsmith. 

345. The Development of Personality 

A study of factors influencing the development of personality. Pre- 
requisite, six hours in psychology or approval of the instructor. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Duffy. 

347. Motivation of Behavior 

A study of the sources or mainsprings of behavior — as needs, wants, 
interests, and motives — with an attempt to determine where and how 
the all-important controls of life can best be applied. Prerequisite, 
six hours in psychology. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Eicher. 

348r. Behavior Problems 

Study of causes and management of common behavior problems in 
children. Typical cases in various age groups through adolescence will 
be studied in relation to total personality development. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 326 or 3U2. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. 
Mellinger. 

350. Schools of Psychology 

A discussion of the major differences in theory of the more promi- 
nent recent "schools" of psychology and of the way in which these dif- 
ferences are reflected in contemporary psychology. Prerequisite, Psy- 
chology 211-212 or 221. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Duffy. 

449. Co-ordinating Course 

Required of majors. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Duffy. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 



166 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barney (Head of the Department), Hooke, 
Miller, LaRochelle, Rene Hardre; Associate Professors 
Abbott, Farinholt, Shaver; Assistant Professors Cutting, 
Funderburk, Felt; Instructors Josefina Hardre, Hunt. 

The department has established a series of sequences in French and 
Spanish in order to make the work of the students majoring in these 
subjects more definite and purposeful. These are: (1) the literary se- 
quence, (2) the teaching sequence, (3) the commercial sequence. The 
list of courses which compose these sequences and other information 
may be obtained at the office of the Department of Romance Languages. 

Since the courses numbered 207, 208, 209, 210, 211-212 are introduc- 
tory to some higher courses in both French and Spanish, students 
majoring in those languages will profit by completing four semesters 
of these in their sophomore year. 

FRENCH 
101-102. Beginning Course 

An introduction of the elementary principles of the French language 
through oral and written procedures with stress on the acquisition of 
an acceptable pronunciation and a practical vocabulary. Phonograph 
records supplement the text. Some reading from modern French litera- 
ture is included. 

Phonograph records used by one section throughout the first semes- 
ter. Hearing and speaking the language precede reading and writing. 
This section meets daily to afford some supervised preparation. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller, 
Miss Shaver, Mr. Felt. 

103-104. Intermediate Course 

Stress in the regular sections on the acquisition of a reasonably 
accurate pronunciation and a practical command of the essentials of 
grammar developed through spoken and written French. The use of 
phonograph records is an integral part of the course. Readings include 
one book on French life and one modern literary work. 

One section, reserved for music majors, has a special program: re- 
view of grammar, diction, reading of "operatic" French works, the 
history of French music. 

A special section is provided for students who attain a certain rating 
on the French test given during Freshman Week. The emphasis in this 
section is on grammar and composition. Modern French texts are read 
in class and as supplementary reading. 



Department of Romance Languages 167 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. Funder- 
burk, Mr. Hooke, Miss Miller, Mr. Hardre, Miss Shaver, Mr. Felt. 

207, 208. Readings from Literature 

Reading in chronological order of selections from French literature. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, three hours each semester. Miss Mil- 
ler, Mr. Barney, Mrs. Funderburk. 

209, 210. Intermediate Composition 

Emphasis on language. Intensive study of grammar, translation into 
French of English sentences and of connected discourse in English, dicta- 
tion, and some conversation. One modern French text will be read each 
semester outside of class. Three hours for the year. Credit three hours 
each semester. Mr. Hooke. 

211-212. Intermediate Conversation 

A review, through conversation, composition, and dictation, of the 
conjugation of the French verb and of the fundamental principles of 
modern French syntax, as well as an intensive and methodical train- 
ing in the acquisition of an active and idiomatic French vocabulary. 
Through oral and written translation and through parallel reading, 
the student will be taught the language of familiar French conversa- 
tion, and will thus be enabled to express herself fluently and correctly 
on a wide range of subjects and to read with understanding the works 
of contemporary French authors. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Hardre. 

325. Survey Course 

Lectures, translations in class, and reports from assigned readings 
on the general development of French literature from the beginning to 
1600. Designed to give the student a general basis for more specific 
work in literature. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. 

326. Survey of Modern French Literature 

A continuation of French 325. An outline of the last three centuries; 
a basis for more specific study. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

327. 328. Seventeenth-Century Literature 

Designed to give a comprehensive view of the literature of the period 
and of the conditions under which it was produced. Selected works from 
the following authors: Corneille, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Mme. de 
Sevigne, Moliere, Racine, La Bruyere, and La Fontaine. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, three hours each semester. 

329, 330. Eighteenth-Century Literature 

Primarily a study of Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, and 
others of the Enlightenment who prepared the way for modern democ- 



168 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

racy, liberty, and science. Full attention to drama, fiction, the salons, 
the quarrel of the ancients and moderns, sentimentalism, etc. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, three hours each semester. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

331. French Romanticism 

A study of the best known poems, novels, and dramas of the first 
half of the nineteenth century. Designed to increase the student's criti- 
cal ability and appreciation of poetry. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Miller. 

335, 336. French Literature since 1850 

A study of the better known writers and literary movements to the 
present, such as Zola, Flaubert, Taine, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Anatole 
France; Bourget, Gide; realism, naturalism, impressionism, symbolism, 
surrealism. Three hours for the year. Credit, three hours each semes- 
ter. Mr. Barney. 

337. Contemporary French Drama 

A survey of French drama from the closing years of the nineteenth 
century to the present. Class discussion and analysis of representative 
plays, reports on supplementary reading. All plays are read in French 
editions. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Hooke. 

340. Modern French Poetry 

A brief study of Baudelaire, Rimbaud, and Mallarme will precede 
the reading of selected poems of Valery, Claudel, Apollinaire, Aragon, 
Eluard, Fargue, Supervielle, LaTour du Pin, and others, as time per- 
mits. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Miller. 

351, 352. Advanced Conversation 

Designed for students who have already attained some degree of 
proficiency in oral French. Special emphasis will be placed on free con- 
versation. The aim of the course is to enable the student to express her- 
self fluently and accurately on most subjects likely to be discussed in 
class and in everyday conversation. There will be a study of French, 
intonations, memorization and recitation of French poems and one-act 
plays, oral reports on French literary works, and discussions of sub- 
jects of current interest. Three hours for the year. Credit, three hours 
each semester. Mr. Hardre. 

353, 354. Advanced Composition 

Designed to enable the student to write idiomatic French, through 
the intensive study of modern French prose and accurate translations 
into French of literary and colloquial English. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, three hours each semester. Mr. Hardre. 



Department of Romance Languages 169 

355-356. Technical and Business French 

Designed to familiarize the student with the French technical terms 
and constructions in reports on economic life and in administrative docu- 
ments, and to train her in French commercial correspondence. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. 

361. Professional Review of Grammar 

Professional review of one or more elementary and reference gram- 
mars. The main principles of grammar, with a view to organizing and 
extending previous knowledge. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

362. Phonetics 

A course in both scientific and practical phonetics. Beginning with 
the description of correct position of the vocal organs for the reproduc- 
tion of the sounds represented by the symbols of the International Pho- 
netic Association, the rules for the pronunciation of single words are 
learned and fixed by much practice in phonetic transcription. The stu- 
dents hear the sounds from records made by native French professors. 
This course should be taken by all those who expect to teach French. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

371, 372. Choses Franchises 

A general information course on France and the French people. 
There will be some consideration of geography and history as a neces- 
sary background, followed by a study of French national traits, home 
life, and institutions. This course is intended to give the student an 
inspirational background for the study of French similar to that ob- 
tained by travel, and to give the prospective teacher of the language a 
fund of information useful in her chosen profession. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, three hours each semester. Mr. Barney. 

374. Montaigne, Voltaire, Anatole France 

A study of the philosophy of these French thinkers. The Essais of 
Montaigne will be read in English translation. Prerequisite, completion 
of six semester hours of Grade II French. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

450. Co-ordinating Course 

This course will attempt to correlate the student's previous training 
in French and, as far as possible, give her an opportunity to view the 
field as a whole. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. 

475. The Early French Novel 

Reading, reports, discussion, and some class translations from the 
sources and beginning of the novel in France to 1800. Three hours for 
the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 



170 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

476. Modern French Novel 

Similar to French 475 in method. Both courses should be elected by 
those who wish to acquire ability for extensive private reading. Three 
hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

SPANISH 

101-102. Elementary Course 

Thorough drill is given in pronunciation, vocabulary building, and 
important principles of grammar. This course is designed to equip the 
student with a solid foundation for more advanced study of the Spanish 
language and literature. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting, Mrs. Hunt. 

103-104. Intermediate Course 

Review of grammar, reading with composition and conversation based 
on texts read. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle, Mr. Hooke, Miss Abbott, Miss Farinholt, Miss Cut- 
ting, Mrs. Hardre. 

207, 208. Readings from Spanish Literature 

Reading in chronological order of selections from Spanish literature. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, three hours each semester. Miss 
Farinholt, Mrs. Hardre. 

209, 210. Intermediate Composition 

An emphasis on language: an intensive study of Spanish grammar, 
the translation into Spanish of English sentences and of connected dis- 
course in English, dictation, pronunciation, and some conversation. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, three hours each semester. Miss LaRochelle. 

211-212. Intermediate Conversation 

Intended primarily for those who desire to gain proficiency in spoken 
Spanish. The work includes oral practice with phonograph records and 
wire, tape, and disc recorders. (The North Carolina Department of Edu- 
cation requires for certification six hours of Spanish conversation.) 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Cutting. 

321. Modern Spanish Novel 

A history of the development of the novel from the thirteenth cen- 
tury to the present. Intensive study of novels by Galdos, Blasco Ibaiiez, 
Martinez Sierra, Valle-Inclan, Ricardo Leon, Perez de Ayala, and 
Unamuno. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle. 



Department of Romance Languages 171 

324. Modern Spanish Drama 

A history of the development of the drama from the thirteenth cen- 
tury to the present. Intensive study of dramas by Zorrilla, Tamayo y 
Baus, Echegaray, Galdos, Benavente, the Quinteros, Martinez Sierra, 
and Casona. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle. 

325. Spanish American Literature to Modernism 

A study of outstanding writers and movements from colonial times 
to the latter part of the nineteenth century. (Suggested allied courses: 
Art 339, History 338, Geography 339.) Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cutting. 

326. Spanish American Literature from Modernism to the Present 

The analysis of representative works from Modernism through the 
Contemporary Period supplemented by lectures on social, literary, and 
cultural backgrounds. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Miss Cutting. 

327. Survey of Spanish Literature 

A study of the development of Spanish literature from the begin- 
ning to 1700. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Farinholt. 

328. Survey of Spanish Literature 

A continuation of Spanish 327. A study of Spanish literature from 
1700 to the present. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Farinholt. 

333. The Renaissance and the Golden Age 

A study of Spanish literature during its most brilliant period, from 
the years of early exploration and discovery through the reign of the 
Hapsburg dynasty. Special emphasis is placed on the study of the de- 
velopment of the popular poetry, the courtly lyric, and the baroque 
poetry of Spain, accompanied by "explicacion de textos," tracing of 
sources and literary themes, and the influences of art and religion. (Sug- 
gested allied courses: English 301, History 355, Art 349 or 350.) Pre- 
requisite, approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Farinholt. 

334. Drama of the Golden Age 

A review of the evolution of Spanish drama, with detailed study of 
plays by Lope de Vega, Ruiz de Alcarcon, Tirso de Molina, and Cal- 
deron. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Farinholt. 



172 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

351-352. Advanced Conversation 

For students who have already attained some proficiency in oral 
Spanish. This course, conducted wholly in Spanish and with emphasis 
placed on free conversation, is designed to bring the student to express 
herself fluently on subjects likely to be discussed in ordinary conversa- 
tion. Further study of pronunciation and intonation. Oral discussions 
and reports. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. 
Hardre. 

353-354. Advanced Composition 

A comprehensive review of the principles of Spanish grammar, their 
practical application in the construction of sentences, paraphrasing from 
Spanish texts, and free composition. (Recommended for prospective 
teachers.) Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Abbott. 

355, 356. Commercial Spanish 

The study of Spanish American business correspondence, commer- 
cial documents, export and import practices, advertising, and commer- 
cial radio programs. Three hours for the year. Credit, three hours each 
semester. Miss Cutting. 

493 494. Honors Course 

Intensive study, beyond that required for a major, in some special 
field of literature. (See "Honors Work" in the catalogue for details.) 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Farinholt. 

ITALIAN 

201-202. Beginning Course 

Study of grammar supplemented with reading and conversation. The 
student will be taught to understand simple Italian, spoken or written, 
and to pronounce the language correctly. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 

303-304. Intermediate Course 

This is a continuation of Italian 201-202. After a further ground- 
ing in the principles of grammar, the student will read Dante's Inferno 
and selections from Petrarch, Boccaccio, and other authors. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 



Department of Sociology 173 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Johnson (Head of the Department), Moss- 
man, Shivers; Instructors Smith, Miriam Johnson. 

courses for undergraduates 

lllr. Southern Regions 

A study of the natural and human resources of the Southeast in 
order to develop an appreciation and understanding of the culture of 
the region and to consider planning for its social and economic develop- 
ment. Elective for freshmen. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Smith. 

211. Introduction to Sociology 

A general survey of introductory sociology. Factors in the social 
life of man: culture, human nature, collective behavior, communities, 
social institutions, social change. Elective for sophomores. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Moss- 
man, Miss Smith, Mrs. Johnson. 

212. Introduction to Sociology 

A continuation of Sociology 211. A study of current social problems 
within the framework of the American Institutions. Elective for sopho- 
mores. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Johnson, Miss Mossman, Miss Smith, Mrs. Johnson. 

321. Principles of Sociology 

A study of the fundamental principles relating to social life and 
social issues. A perspective of the general nature of society as seen 
collectively in terms of social organization and social change. May not 
be taken by students who have credit for Sociology 211. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Smith. 

323. Social Psychology 

A study of individual and collective behavior in relation to the 
various social and cultural influences. Emphasis on the social and cul- 
tural aspects of personality and group life. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

324. Rural Social Problems 

Social relationships and social problems of rural life. The whole 
complex of group characteristics, social arrangements, traits, and in- 
stitutions relating to rural living, with especial emphasis on the South. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson. 



174 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

325. Group Leadership 

Factors involved in the interaction and leadership process within 
small groups. Includes several sociological approaches to group 
dynamics. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Smith. 

326. The Community 

A study of the relation of the individual to the modern community. 
An emphasis en trends in community planning, and the relation of such 
groups as teachers, social workers, and lay persons to community life. 
Prerequisites, Sociology 211 and 212, or 321, or in the case of seniors, 
approval of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Smith. 

327. Interracial Relations 

Problems of racial adjustment, with emphasis on relations between 
whites and Negroes. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Johnson. 

328. Cultural Anthropology 

A study of man and his works. Human origins, races of man, cul- 
ture, primitive societies, and other social phenomena considered as an 
approach to a better understanding of human personality, group life, 
and civilization in our time. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

333. The Family 

An historical introduction to the institution of the family is followed 
by a study of the modern American family. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Shivers. 

I335r. Marriage 

A study of the practical problems of courtship and marriage, with 
emphasis on personal relationships. Three hours. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Shivers. 

336. Criminology 

A survey of the nature and evolution of crime, causes, examination 
of criminal procedure, and historical development of the methods of 
punishment. Analysis of case studies of delinquents; treatment of the 
criminal. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Shivers. 

339. Introduction to the Field of Social Work 

A general view of the entire field of social work, including historical 
background and the present scope, aims, and methods. Field trips are 



1 This course cannot be used to fulfill the social science requirement for graduation. 



Department of Sociology 175 

taken to public and private social agencies. Open to majors in sociology 
and others with approval of the instructor. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

340. Introduction to the Field of Social Work 

A study of the organization and methods of social agencies, with 
special emphasis on the techniques used in treatment in specialized 
fields, including study of local agencies. Open to those who have taken 
Sociology 339. Two class lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory 
period, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Mossman. 

342. Social Problems of Child Welfare 

A study of the normal process of socialization will serve as back- 
ground for a discussion of methods of caring for dependent, neglected, 
and disturbed children, and the agencies established to deal with these 
problems. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Johnson. 

344. An Introduction to Methods of Social Research 

A study of methods of planning and conducting community surveys, 
and methods of study of social conditions and institutions. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Johnson. 

449. Co-ordinating Course: Sociological Theory 

A seminar in contemporary theories of sociology. Required for ma- 
jors. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson. 

469r. Special Problems in Sociology 

An opportunity for the student to work individually on problems of 
special interest to her. The student should consult the instructor before 
registering. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Staff. 

470r. Special Problems in Sociology 

A continuation of Sociology 469. Prerequisite, Sociology 469. Three 
hours. Credit, three semester hours. Staff. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Staff. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

524ab. Rural and Urban Social Problems 

a. Rural social problems. 

b. Urban social problems. 

Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 



176 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

526ab. Community Organization 

a. Community organization to deal with major social needs. 

b. Methods for discovering community needs such as the social sur- 
vey and community study. 

Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

542ab. Community Services for Children 

a. Provisions for the special care of children. 

b. Changing conceptions of juvenile delinquency. 
Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

583ab. Culture and Society 

a. Analysis of the nature, structure, and aspects of culture as a 
frame of reference for the study of our society. 

b. Comparative study of representative primitive cultures. 
Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

585. Educational Sociology 

The integration of education with the life and institutions of the 
community. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Charles E. Prall, Dean 

Professors Clutts, McNutt, Vaughan; Associate Pro- 
fessors Denneen, Eugenia Hunter, Smith; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Fitzgerald, Gunter, Hagood, Huffman, Mary Hun- 
ter, Kreimeier, Mehaffie, Peden, Reger, Watson ; Instruc- 
tors Austin, Avent, Burke, Daily, Liddle, Moody, Park, 
Riley, Louise White, Nancy White; Lecturer Bertram; Li- 
brarian Hopper. 

The Curry School, located on the college campus, includes kinder- 
garten, elementary, and secondary schools. It serves as a demonstra- 
tion, practice, and experimental center with particular emphasis upon 
the educational needs and problems of North Carolina. The teachers 
and pupils supply laboratory experiences for students in the depart- 
ments of the College that are concerned with child development. Under- 
graduates make their first individual studies here, with classroom ob- 
servation and responsible teaching following in that order. The school 
is a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools and is administered by the principal. 

31 7r. The American Public School 

The unique function of public education in a democracy; the inter- 
relationships of local, state, and national governments to education; the 
overall organization, administration, and financing of public education; 
an overview of the school's curriculum; pupil personnel and pupil ac- 
counting; teaching as a vocation and a profession. Required in the ele- 
mentary curriculum; recommended to meet certification requirements for 
secondary teachers. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Bertram, Mr. Prall. 

481r. The Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education in the 
Public School 

The background, purposes, and concepts basic to public education; 
the school as an expression of social and economic life, as a modifying 
influence on this life, as an interpreter of ideologies, as an instrument 
for the transmission of culture; the evolution, use, and personal sig- 
nificance to the teacher of the dominant American philosophy of edu- 
cation. Required in the elementary curriculum; recommended to com- 
plete certification requirement for secondary teachers. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. McNutt. 

177 



178 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

489. History of Education 

The evolution of formal education in Western cultures with particu- 
lar emphasis upon American modifications arising from the frontier ex- 
perience of the people and the industrial revolution; contributions and 
personalities of the great leaders. General elective. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

35 Or. The Secondary School Pupil 

Physical, mental, and social development at the secondary age levels; 
the goals of the American secondary school as related to individuals; 
pupil study through observation and the use of anecdotal records; prac- 
tical procedures for meeting individual differences; tests and evaluations 
of teaching; extracurricular activities of secondary students with op- 
portunity for observation and participation. Certificate requirement for 
secondary teachers. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Clutts, Mr. Vaughan. 

35 lr. Teaching English in Secondary Schools 

This course is designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the 
modern concepts and practices of English instruction in the secondary 
schools. Emphasis is given to the teaching of the four fundamental 
language arts of speaking, writing, reading, and listening. Prerequisite 
to student teaching in English. Three hours. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Kreimeier. 

352. Teaching the Secondary School Romance Languages 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to ob- 
jectives in Romance languages; criteria for methods, devices, and ma- 
terials; controlled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry 
School. Required of student teachers in Romance languages. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Burke. 

353. Teaching the Social Studies in Secondary Schools 

A study of the organization of the social studies in the secondary 
schools; classroom methods, techniques, and activities; teaching ma- 
terials; testing and evaluation. Prerequisite or corequisite, Education 
350. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Mehaffie. 

355. Teaching Secondary School Latin 

Aims and general methods of teaching Latin; methods of teaching 
specific points — vocabulary, derivatives, forms, syntax, and translation; 
correlation of Latin with English; devices for stimulating interest and 
visualizing Roman life; illustrative material; course of study, text books 
and supplementary books; standard tests. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Denneen. 



School of Education 179 

357. Teaching Secondary School Mathematics 

The effective guidance of secondary classes in their approach to ob- 
jectives in mathematics; criteria for methods, devices, and materials; 
controlled purposeful observation and teaching in the Curry School. 
Required of student teachers in mathematics. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hagood. 

359. Teaching Secondary School Science 

The mission of science as a high-school subject; whether present- 
day courses are achieving this goal. Science in the early secondary 
schools; current trends and their causes. Principles for selection and 
organization of content; methods in laboratory and classroom; evalua- 
tion of teaching. Course presupposes a teaching knowledge of physical 
and biological sciences. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

461r. Student Teaching 

Supervised student teaching in Curry Secondary School. Under the 
direction of the principal of the school and a special supervisor for each 
subject. Introductory observation and participation; semi-independent 
teaching; daily teaching on an hourly basis; conferences with super- 
visors. Prerequisite, all anticipatory courses. Certificate requirement for 
secondary teachers. Five hours. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Vaughan and supervisors. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

330r. Group Observation and Study of Elementary Pupils 

Review, mastery, and practical application of the fundamental theo- 
retical concepts of the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional de- 
velopment of groups of elementary pupils through out-of-school and 
in-school experiences; diagnostic and remedial procedures in teaching; 
tests and evaluations of the results of teaching; extracurricular in- 
school experiences of elementary pupils. Certificate requirement for 
elementary teachers. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Bertram, Miss Eugenia Hunter. 

413-414. Curriculum for Kindergarten and Primary Grades 

The organization and functions of the curriculum for the kinder- 
garten and primary grades; first semester, the language arts; second 
semester, arithmetic, physical and social sciences; demonstrations in the 
kindergarten and primary grades. Required of primary teachers. Six 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Eugenia Hunter. 

424. Literature for Young Children (Kindergarten-Primary) 

The reading, discussion, enjoyment, and organization of materials 
suited to the interests and needs of young children. Required of pri- 
mary teachers. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Eugenia Hunter. 



180 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

443-444. Curriculum for Intermediate and Upper Grades 

The organization of the curriculum for the intermediate and upper 
grades; first semester, arithmetic and the language arts; second semes- 
ter, physical and social sciences; supervised observation. Required of 
upper elementary teachers. Six hours for the year. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Miss Bertram. 

446. Literature for the Upper Elementary School 

The literature suitable for children in the middle and upper grades; 
its place in the integrated curriculum. Required of upper elementary 
teachers. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Bertram. 

463r. Student Teaching 

Supervised student teaching in elementary schools. Under the direc- 
tion of the principal of the school, a college teacher of methods courses, 
and a special supervisor for each grade. Introductory observation and 
participation; semi-independent teaching; daily teaching on a two-hour 
basis; conferences with the teacher of methods and supervisors. Pre- 
requisite, all anticipatory courses. Certificate requirement for elementary 
teachers. Ten hours. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Vaughan, Miss 
Eugenia Hunter, Miss Bertram, and supervisors. 

464. Student Teaching in Nursery School 

Intended for those primary education majors who need additional 
student teaching credit to meet certification requirements in other states. 
Prerequisite, Education S30. Six hours. Credit, three semester hours 
which must be in addition to the 122 required for graduation. Mrs. 
McCartney. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The following courses are designed to prepare school librarians. 

321. School Library Administration 

A study of the organization, administration, and functions of the 
school library. Special attention is given to equipment and arrangement 
of rooms, budgets, book buying, circulation, publicity, records, reports, 
and the care of non-book materials. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. 

322. Classification and Cataloguing 

Principles in the classification and cataloguing of books. Supervised 
practice in applying the simplified Dewey Decimal system, cataloguing 
books and organizing a dictionary catalogue. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. 

323. Book Selection for Young People 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 



School of Education 181 

324. Reference 

A course designed to give students acquaintance with various types 
of reference materials, standards for their evaluation, and methods of 
utilizing them in school libraries. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Reger. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

501. Health of Young Children 

Physical defects, respiratory and circulatory disturbances, endocrine 
balance, orthopedic and muscular defects, communicable diseases com- 
mon to the age. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

504. Physical Behavior Patterns of the Elementary Child 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

520ab. The Teacher and the Library 

a. The library and its resources, b. Book selection and reading 
guidance. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

521. Literature in Elementary Education 

Prerequisite, an undergraduate course in children's literature. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

523. Reading in the Elementary School 

Prerequisite, an undergraduate course in methods of reading. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

525ab. Language Arts in the Elementary School 

a. North Carolina's Twelve- Year Program, b. Curriculum for spe- 
cific grades or levels. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four se- 
mester hours. 

527. Reading Clinic 

Theory, observation, and participation. Prerequisite, undergraduate 
course in reading methods. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

528. Reading in the Twelve- Year Program 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

529. Supervision of the Reading Program 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

530. Reading in Primary Grades 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 



182 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

541. Music Program of the Elementary School 

Prerequisite, undergraduate state requirement in music education. 
Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

542. Improvement of Music Reading 

Prerequisite, undergraduate state requirement in music education. 
Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

546. Curriculum Related Music 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

548. School Music Clinic 

Theory, observation, and participation. Prerequisite, undergraduate 
state requirement in music education. Credit, one-half course; two se- 
mester hours. 

549. Seminar, Music Education 

Prerequisite, Course 5^1, 5U2, or 5 US. Credit, one-half course; two 
semester hours. 

560abc. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom 

a. Basic principles, b. Applications in classroom organization and 
management, c. Problem children. Credit, one-half, one, or one and 
one-half courses; two, four, or six semester hours. 

5 61 a be. Supervision: Evaluation and Improvement of Instruction 

a. Superior practice in skill aspects, b. Superior practice in con- 
tent aspects, c. Criteria for activity programs. Credit, one-half, one, 
or one and one-half courses; two, four, or six semester hours. 

566ab. Educational Measurement 

a. Basic concepts, measures of achievement, tests of general ability, 
b. Tests of special abilities, personality, interests, attitudes. Credit, 
one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

567ab. Educational Guidance in the Elementary School 

a. General principles, b. Applications, devices, instruments. Credit, 
one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

568ab. Elementary School Organization and Administration 

a. General principles and common types, b. Applications, devices, 
instruments. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

569abc. Curriculum Construction 

a. General principles, b. Primary-kindergarten curricula, c. Upper 
grade curricula. Credit, one-half, one, or one and one-half courses; two, 
four, or six semester hours. 



School of Education 183 

570ab. Teaching Clinic 

Theory, observation, participation, a. General clinic, b. Social studies. 
Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

571ab. Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools 

a. Types and general principles, b. Specifics used in implementa- 
tion. Credit, one-half or one course; two or four semester hours. 

572. Content Curriculum for the Child of Six to Nine 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

573. Improvement of Instruction in Elementary Schools 

Credit, one course; four semester hours. 

574. Elementary School Problems 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

575. Evaluation of Student Progress 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

582. Biography for Teachers 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

583. Cultural Comparisons: Primitive Contemporaries 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

584. Geographic Patterns and Problems in Elementary Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

605. Practical Arts in Elementary Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

620. The Atypical Child 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

623. Behavior Problems 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

626ab. Seminar: The Pre-school Child 

a. Selected problem, b. Selected problem. Credit, one-half or one 
course; two or four semester hours. 

640ab. Philosophy of Education 

a. Evolution of the dominant American philosophy, b. Use as a 
criterion in the evaluation of school practices. Credit, one-half or one 
course; two or four semester hours. 



184 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

660. Principles of Elementary School Science 

The orientation of young children in scientific attitudes and habits 
through investigations appropriate for the age level. Credit, one-half 
course, two semester hours. 

661abc. Elementary School Science 

a. The North Carolina Twelve- Year Program, b. Science on the 
primary-kindergarten level, c. Science on the upper-grade level. Credit, 
one-half, one, or one and one-half courses; two, four, or six semester 
hours. 

662. Audio-Visual Education 

An examination of educational procedures with view to extending 
the use of audio-visual aids; principles, equipment, materials. Credit, 
one-half course; two semester hours. 

663. Resource-Use Education 

Education to promote the better use of human and material re- 
sources. Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

692. Character Education 

Credit, one-half course; two semester hours. 

COURSE FOR GRADUATES 

681. Modern Language 

Offered as a research tool. Consult the head of the Department of 
Romance Languages. No credit. 

THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Katherine E. Roberts, Dean 

Professors Keeney, Kremer, Penn, Playfoot, Swanson ; 
Associate Professors Coxe, Howell, Rosa, Street ; Assistant 
Professors Cox, Hathaway, Kaiser, Kehoe, Lowe, Staley, 
Surratt; Instructors Delony, McCartney; Graduate Assist- 
ants Coleman, Day, Greenlee, Leath, McComb, Parra- 

MORE, SCHAPER, TEUFEL, WOMBLE. 

The School of Home Economics offers both undergraduate and grad- 
uate courses in its various subject-matter fields, leading to the bachelor's 
and master's degrees. 

The subject-matter fields of home economics include foods, nutrition, 
clothing, textiles, housing, management, family economics, home rela- 






School of Home Economics 185 

tionships, and child development. The scientific, economic, social, and 
aesthetic factors of each subject are studied in relation to personal, 
home, and professional living. 

The general education requirements of this program include courses 
in the humanities, the biological and physical sciences, and the social 
sciences. 

The specialized curricula in home economics prepare for many careers 
and professions, including homemaking, public school and college teach- 
ing, co-operative extension service, nursery school education, adult edu- 
cation, nutrition education, food demonstration work, hospital dietetics, 
school lunchroom management, commercial food service, institution 
management, clothing and textile designing, textile testing, merchandis- 
ing, interior decoration, experimental laboratory work, research, and 
home economics journalism. 

Courses listed under "Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates" 
may be taken for graduate credit, provided an additional problem, equiv- 
alent to one semester hour of work, is approved by the instructor and 
satisfactorily completed. 

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Before being admitted to candidacy for the master's degree in home 
economics, the student must have received a bachelor's degree in home 
economics or in a related field from an accredited college or university. 
Further information concerning graduate work and requirements for 
the master's degree may be secured by writing to the head of the school. 
See also Graduate School, page 216. 

GENERAL COURSES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

lOOr. Introduction to Home Economics 

Basic principles of room furnishing, clothing selection and groom- 
ing, money management and buying principles, social customs and 
etiquette, and personal relationships. Elective for freshmen and sopho- 
mores other than home economics majors. Three lectures. Credit, three 
semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

300r. Principles of Home Living 

Basic principles pertinent to clothing the family, feeding the family, 
house planning and furnishing, consumer buying, budgeting, child care 
and training, and family relationships. Elective for junior and senior 
students other than home economics majors. Three lectures. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 



186 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

401r. Special Problem in Home Economics 

An individual problem to be selected by the student under the guid- 
ance of the adviser. The problem will be worked out under the super- 
vision of an assigned staff member. Conference hours to be arranged. 
Credit, two to four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

493-494. Honors Work 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Assigned staff 
member. 

FOR GRADUATES 

501r. Special Problem in Home Economics 

An individual problem of pertinent interest to the student and ap- 
proved by an assigned staff member. Conference hours to be arranged. 
Credit, one to four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

511r. Thesis Seminar 

Report of progress and discussion of theses and related problems. 
Parallel with thesis problem. No credit. Assigned staff members. 

530. Fundamentals of Laboratory Research in Home Economics 

Methods of research adapted to the different subject-matter fields of 
home economics, to develop the scientific approach and techniques neces- 
sary for research. Prerequisite, basic sciences, with approval of the in- 
structor. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories, either semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $b.00. Assigned staff 
member. 

5 5 Or. Thesis Problem 

Individual guidance in the thesis problem. Credit, three semester 
hours. Thesis adviser. 

570r. Minor Research 

An individual problem required of candidates for a Master of Edu- 
cation degree. Credit, two to six semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

101r. Clothing Construction and Selection 

Fundamental principles in the selection, purchase, and construction 
of clothing and textiles for the individual. One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratories. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Delony. 



School of Home Economics 187 

301r. Dress Design and Construction I 

The foundation pattern, flat pattern construction; and the construc- 
tion of garments from designed patterns. Prerequisites, Home Eco- 
nomics 101 and Art 101 or approved equivalents. One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratories. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Miss Coxe, Mrs. Staley. 

311r. Dress Design and Construction II 

Art principles applied to ensemble planning and dress designing and 
construction. Prerequisites, Art 101 and Home Economics 301 or ap- 
proved equivalents. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory . Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe, Miss Delony. 

341r. Textiles 

The study of textiles from raw materials through construction; iden- 
tification; analysis; choice, use, and care of fabrics. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Keeney. 

351r. Clothing Selection and Care 

A study of factors influencing personal appearance — color, design, 
individual characteristics, buymanship, and care, as these relate to 
clothing selection for young adults. This course is planned primarily for 
other than home economics majors, with emphasis on personal develop- 
ment and improvement. Three lectures. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Staley. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

504. History of Costume 

The historical, literary, and artistic background of the costume of 
various countries from early civilization to the present. Three lectures, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Coxe. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

514. History of Textiles 

The historical and artistic background of textiles of various coun- 
tries from early civilization through modern times. Selected field trips. 
Three lectures, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Coxe. 

524. Textile Technology 

An advanced study of the physical and chemical properties of fibers 
and fabrics in relation to processing methods, handling, and adapt- 
ability. Prerequisite, Home Economics 3J+1 or approved equivalent. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Keeney. 



188 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

541r. Textile Analysis 

Advanced study of textile fibers and fabrics through standard test- 
ing. Prerequisites, Home Economics 34.1, basic sciences, or approved 
equivalents. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories. Either semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Keeney. 

551. Clothing the Family 

The selection, purchase, construction, care, and budgeting of the 
family clothing in relation to family needs and income. One lecture and 
one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Assigned staff members. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

561. Clothing and Textile Economics 

The economic and social aspects of production, distribution, use, and 
care of clothing and textiles. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Coxe, Miss Keeney. 

571. Advanced Clothing Construction 

The development of appreciation of line, form, texture, and color 
through draping and creative construction. Prerequisite, Home Eco- 
nomics 311 or approved equivalent. One lecture and two three-hour 
laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe, Mrs. Staley. 

for graduates 

531. Problems in Clothing and Textiles 

Advanced problems for clothing and textile graduate students with 
the approval of the instructor. Either semester. Credit, two to four 
semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

581. Dress Design and Construction III 

Advanced study of creative dress design and construction; their 
relation to fashion, materials, the human form, and accessories. Pre- 
requisite, Home Economics 571 or approved equivalent. One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. 

591. Problems in Tailoring 

The comparative study of methods and techniques of tailoring, with 
practical application related to the selection and construction of tailored 
garments. Prerequisite, Home Economics 571 or approved equivalent. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, either semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe, Mrs. Staley. 

594. Readings in Clothing and Textiles 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in 
clothing and textiles. Either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Assigned staff members. 



School op Home Economics 189 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

103r. Food Selection and Preparation 

Standards of selection, purchase, preparation, storage and service 
of food. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Howell, Mrs. Surratt. 

213r. Nutrition 

Fundamental principles of nutrition, food preparation, and meal 
planning as related to health and efficiency. Prerequisite or parallel, 
one year of science. Three lectures. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Cox. 

303r. Meal Study 

The planning, marketing, storing, preparing, and serving of food for 
family meals and special functions at different cost levels. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 103 or approved equivalent. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.50. Miss Howell. 

31 3r. Nutrition and Dietetics 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and their application to the 
planning of adequate dietaries for normal individuals and family groups 
of different economic levels. Prerequisites or parallels, Chemistry 225 
and 826 or approved equivalents. Two lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Cox. 

353r. Food Preparation and Meal Service 

The selection, purchase, storage, and preparation of food; the plan- 
ning and serving of meals for different occasions at varying cost levels. 
Planned primarily for other than home economics majors. Two lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.50. Mrs. Surratt. 

FOR advanced undergraduates and graduates 

503. Experimental Food Study 

Experimental study of factors regulating the preparation of stand- 
ard food products. Prerequisites or parallels, Home Economics SIS and 
Physics SOI or approved equivalents. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.50. Miss Howell. 

523. Nutrition Education 

An advanced study of the fundamental principles of nutrition, their 
relation to health of the individual, and the study and application of 
effective methods of teaching nutrition on different age levels. Prerequi- 
sites, Home Economics 213, Biology 277 and Chemistry 326 or approved 
equivalents, with advanced undergraduate or graduate standing. Two 
lectures, either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Cox. 



190 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

533. Food Economics 

Food production and distribution; markets and marketing; selection 
and storage ; standardization and prices ; utilization of foods in the home. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Howell. 

563. Food Preservation 

The comparative study of various methods of food preservation with 
laboratory application, emphasizing recent developments and methods. 
For home economics majors only. One lecture and one three-hour lab- 
oratory, either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.50. Assigned staff member. 

573. Diet Therapy 

The modification of normal diet to meet the dietary requirements of 
pathological and special conditions. Prerequisites, Home Economics 313, 
Biology 277. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Cox. 

583. Food Demonstration Techniques 

Demonstration as an educational device; organization and execution 
of individual and group demonstrations. Prerequisite, Home Economics 
213. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory , either semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.50. Miss Howell, Miss Cox. 

593. Advanced Nutrition 

Continued study of nutrition, emphasizing pregnancy, infancy 
through adolescence, the aged, and other normal nutritional conditions. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 313. Three lectures, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Cox. 

FOR GRADUATES 

513. Readings in Foods and Nutrition 

Reports and discussion of recent developments in research in foods 
and nutrition. Either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Assigned 
staff member. 

553. Problems in Foods and Nutrition 

Advanced problems for foods and nutrition graduate students with 
the approval of the instructor. Either semester. Credit, two to four 
semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

HOUSING AND MANAGEMENT 

for undergraduates 

205r. The House and Its Furnishings 

The planning and furnishing of houses in relation to family activi- 
ties, preferences and income. Prerequisite, Art 101 or equivalent. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Hathaway. 



School of Home Economics 191 

335. Home Crafts 

Home craft problems applied to dress, dress accessories, and home 
furnishings are discussed, designed, and executed. One lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Assigned staff member. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

355r. Planning and Furnishing the House 

The aesthetic, economic, and practical problems involved in planning 
and furnishing a livable home. Planned primarily for other than home 
economics majors. Three lectures. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Hathaway. 

405r. Home Management House Residence 

Application of principles of management through residence in the 
home management house. Group conferences. Nine weeks. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

446r. Family Economics 

Principles and problems of the consumer-buyer; organization and 
management of household activities, time, labor, and income as they 
affect family relationships. Prerequisite or parallel, Home Economics 
405. Four lectures, nine weeks. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

515r. Household Equipment 

The selection, operation, care, and arrangement of household equip- 
ment in relation to income, time, and labor. Prerequisite, Physics SOI 
or approved equivalent. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $If.OO. Mrs. Street. 

535. Advanced Home Crafts 

Advanced problems in home crafts applied to dress and house, with 
emphasis on advanced weaving. One lecture and one three-hour lab- 
oratory per week, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Assigned staff member. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

536. History of Furniture 

The dominant influences and characteristics of the historical and 
contemporary furniture design. Field trips required. Three lectures, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Hathaway. 

545. Family Finance 

Budgeting, accounting, credit, investment, and control of property 
as they affect the use of family income. Two lectures, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street, assigned staff member. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 



192 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

555. Housing 

The economic and social significance of modern housing. Prerequi- 
site, Home Economies 205 or by approval. Two lectures second semes- 
ter. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Hathaway. 

575. Advanced Home Furnishing 

Advanced study of aesthetic, economic, and practical problems in- 
volved in furnishing a livable home. Creative problems which include 
practical experience will be executed. Field trips required. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 205. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Hathaway. 

FOR GRADUATES 

505. Advanced Home Management 

Special studies of home management house problems will be made 
under supervision. Prerequisite, Home Economics 405 or approved equiv- 
alent. First semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

506. Social and Economic Problems of the Family 

A study of present-day home and family living as affected by social 
and economic factors. First semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Kremer. 

516. Problems in Family Economics and Home Management 

Individual study of problems in family economics and home manage- 
ment for graduate students in home economics. First semester. Credit, 
two to four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

525. Work Simplification 

Study of the practical problems of home management in relation to 
the use of time and motion. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. 
Street. 

526. Readings in Family Economics and Home Management 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in family 
economics and home management. First semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Kremer. 

565. Problems in Housing and Furnishing 

Advanced problems for graduate students in housing and furnishing, 
with the approval of the instructor. Second semester. Credit, two to 
four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 



School of Home Economics 193 

585. Readings in Housing 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in hous- 
ing. First semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Kremer. 

(Not offered in 1953-1954.) 

595. Advanced Household Equipment 

This course will consist of the intensive study of selected household 
equipment. Prerequisite, Home Economics 515, or approved equivalent. 
Second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. 

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HOME RELATIONSHIPS 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

302r. Child Development 

The physical, mental, and social development of the young child in 
the home. Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or approved equivalent. Four 
lectures and observation in nursery school for nine weeks. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mrs. Rosa, Mrs. McCartney. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

512r. Home Relationships 

The relationships of parents and children as they are affected by 
modern living. Prerequisite or parallel, Home Economics 302 or So- 
ciology 321 or approved equivalent. Four lectures for nine weeks. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

522. Family Life Education 

Methods of teaching family life education. Prerequisites or parallels, 
Home Economics 302 and 512. Group conferences each week with obser- 
vation and experience to be arranged, first semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

532. Nursery School Education 

The theory and practice of nursery school teaching. Prerequisites or 
parallel, Home Economics 302 and 512 or approved equivalents. Group 
conferences each week with experience in the nursery school, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa, Mrs. McCartney. 

FOR graduates 

502. Problems in Child Development 

Advanced problems for child development graduate students with the 
permission of the instructor. Either semester. Credit, two to four semes- 
ter hours. Mrs. Rosa. 



194 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



542r. Readings in Child Development and Family Relationships 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in child 
development and family relationships. Either semester. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

S552. Child Development for Advanced Students 

Designed for advanced students, this course includes a study of the 
physical and psychological development of young children at home and 
in the community. Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or approved equivalent. 
Observation in the nursery school required. Not open to students with 
credit in Home Economics 302. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

307r. Teaching Methods in Home Economics 

Principles of education applied to the field of home economics teach- 
ing. Prerequisite or parallel, Psychology 222 or Education 350 or ap- 
proved equivalent. Three lectures. Credit, three semester hours. Fee, 
$2.00. Miss Playfoot. 

467r. Supervised Teaching in Home Economics 

Principles of teaching applied to situations found in the secondary 
school with participation in urban and rural centers. Nine weeks. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Playfoot, Mrs. Kehoe, and others. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

508. Vocational Home Economics Education 

The study and discussion of special problems relating to the voca- 
tional homemaking program. Two lectures. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Kehoe. 

518. Methods in Adult Homemaking Education 

Adult homemaking education with emphasis on organization of 
classes, teaching materials, and teaching techniques. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mrs. Rosa. 

597. Audio-Visual Education in Home Economics 

This course will include the evaluation and use of audio-visual ma- 
terials in home economics teaching. Two lectures. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mrs. Kehoe. 

FOR GRADUATES 

507. Readings in Home Economics Education 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in home 
economics education. Either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Assigned staff member. 



School of Home Economics 195 

527. Problems in Home Economics Education 

An advanced study of methods to be used in developing techniques 
conducive to optimum learning techniques in various situations. Credit, 
two to four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 

537. Problems of the Supervisory Teacher in Home Economics Education 

The problems and methods of supervision as they relate to student 
and teacher growth; school organization; supervision of student teach- 
ing, correlation of subject matter and experiences in the school, home, 
and community; the integration of the whole school program. Group 
conferences, with observation and experience to be arranged, either se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Playfoot. 

557. Measurements in Home Economics 

This course presents measurement techniques, their evaluation and 
use in home economics teaching. Two lectures, either semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Assigned staff member. 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

509r. Quantity Cookery 

The application of the principles of cookery to the preparation of 
food in large quantities. Emphasis is placed on menu planning, the cor- 
rect use and care of power equipment, cost control, and food service. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 303 or approved equivalent. One lecture 
and two three-hour laboratories, either semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Penn. 

519r. Institution Management 

The planning, organization, and administration of institution food 
service, personnel, and work units. Open only to institution manage- 
ment majors. Two lectures, either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Penn. 

520r. Institution Marketing 

A study of purchasing procedures, quantity buying guides, food 
storage, and methods of cost control. Prerequisite, Home Economics 519. 
Two lectures, either semester. Field trips required. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Penn. 

539. Advanced Institution Management 

The furnishing, maintenance, and administration of institution hous- 
ing. Three lectures, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Assigned staff member. 



196 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

540. School Food Service 

A study of the selection, purchase, preparation, and service of food 
for school lunchrooms. Organization, administration, records and cost 
control applicable to school lunchrooms will be included in the course. 
One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Penn. 

549r. Supervised Experience in Institution Management 

Directed experiences in managerial problems of institution food 
service. Prerequisite, Home Economics 520. Three three-hour labora- 
tories, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Penn, Miss 
Kaiser. 

FOR GRADUATES 

529. Readings in Institution Management 

Reports and discussion of recent developments and research in insti- 
tution administration. Either semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Assigned staff member. 

559. Advanced Quantity Cookery 

Advanced problems in the standardization, preparation, and cost of 
food on the quantity basis. Prerequisite, Home Economics 509 or ap- 
proved equivalent. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory, either 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Penn. 

560. Problems in Institution Management 

Advanced problems for institution management graduate students 
with the permission of the instructor. Either semester. Credit, two to 
four semester hours. Assigned staff member. 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Professors Thompson, Minor (Acting Head of the 
School) ; Associate Professors DeVeny, Holloway; Assistant 
Professors Dickieson, Cowling, Weisgarber, Phillip Mor- 
gan, Claire Atkisson, 2 Darnell, Wold, Harold AtKisson, 
Wollman; Instructors Inga Morgan, Ingram, Holroyd; 
Assistant Laura-Mae AtKisson; Graduate Assistant Erick- 

SON. 

The School of Music offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bache- 
lor of Music and Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music. 



^n leave of absence, 1952-1953. 



School of Music 



197 



The School of Music is a member of the National Association of 
Schools of Music. The requirements for entrance and for graduation as 
set forth in this catalogue are in accordance with the published regula- 
tions of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

All students majoring in music are required to be members of the 
college choir or orchestra unless excused by the dean of the School of 
Music. 

The fees for lessons in applied music (piano, organ, violin, voice, 
violoncello, and wind instruments) are given on pages 50-51. 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

For this degree the following majors are offered: Piano, Organ, 
Violin, Violoncello, Viola, Voice, Music Theory, Music Education, and 
Instrumental Music Education. 



A. MAJOR IN PIANO*, ORGANS VIOLIN3, VIOLA3 
OR VIOLONCELLOS 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101, 102 6 

Music 111, 112 4 

Applied Music 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201, 202 6 

Music 231, 232 6 

Applied Music 201-202 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Music 211, 212 2 

Physical Education 1 



32 



33 



Junior S.H. 

Music 301, 302 4 

Applied Music 301-302 10 

Psychology 221 3 

Music 355, 356 4 

Music Electives 4 

College Elective 3 



28 



Senior S.H. 

Music 401-402 4 

Applied Music 401-402 10 

Music 455-456 4 

Music Electives 9 

College Elective 3 



30 



1 Students majoring in Piano who are deficient in sight-reading must pursue a regular 
non-credit course in this field until the music faculty passes favorably upon their sight- 
reading ability. Piano majors are required to participate in ensemble group rehearsals 
at the request of their teacher. 

2 Students majoring in Organ must elect Music 323-324. 

"Violin, Viola, and Violoncello majors are required to play in ensemble groups at the 
request of their teacher. 



198 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



B. MAJOR IN VOICE 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101, 102 6 

Music 111, 112 4 

Voice 103-104 4 

Piano 113-114 2 

English 101-102 6 

German 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201, 202 6 

Music 231, 232 6 

Voice 203-204 4 

Piano 213-214 2 

English 211-212 6 

French 6 

Music 211, 212 2 

Physical Education 1 



32 



33 



Junior S.H. 

Voice 303-304 8 

Psychology 221 3 

Italian 6 

Music Electives 8 

College Elective 3 

Music 311, 312 2 



30 



Senior S.H. 

Music 301, 302 4 

Music 355 2 

Music 435, 436 4 

Voice 403-404 8 

Music Electives 7 

College Elective 3 



28 



A candidate for the degree in Voice must demonstrate her ability 
to play piano accompaniments of average difficulty before the completion 
of her course. 



C. AND D. MAJORS IN MUSIC EDUCATION 



C. General Course 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101, 102 6 

Music 111, 112 4 

Piano 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201, 202 6 

Music 231, 232 6 

Music 211, 212 2 

Piano 201-202 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



32 



33 



School of Music 



199 



Junior S.H. 

Music 311, 312 2 

Music 315 3 

Music 335, 336 4 

Voice 305-306 4 

Music 325-326 2 

Psychology 221, 222 6 

Music 355 2 

Music 302 2 

Music 435, 436 4 

Education 350 3 



Senior S.H. 

Music 445-446 4 

Voice 405-406 4 

Music 425, 426 2 

Music 465, 466 6 

Violin 475-476 4 

Music 455-456 4 

Education 317 or 481 3 



27 



32 



D. Instrumental Supervision Course 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101, 102 6 

Music 111, 112 4 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

107-108 4 

Piano 117-118 2 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



32 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201, 202 6 

Music 231, 232 6 

Music 211, 212 2 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

207-208 4 

Piano 217-218 2 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



33 



Junior S.H. 

Music 311, 312 2 

Music 315 3 

Major Orchestral Instrument 

307-308 4 

Music 335, 336 4 

Psychology 221, 222 6 

Music 355 2 

Music 302 2 

Minor String Instrument 

317-318 4 

Education 350 3 



Senior SJI. 

Major String Instrument 

407-408 4 

Music 445-446 4 

Music 465, 466 6 

Education 317 or 481 3 

Music 455-456 4 

Music 435, 436 4 

Minor Brass Instrument 

417-418 2 

Minor Woodwind 

Instrument, 317-318 2 



30 



29 



200 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



E. MAJOR IN MUSIC THEORY 



Freshman S.H. 

Applied Music 131-132 6 

Music 101, 102 6 

Music 111, 112 4 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Applied Music 231-232 6 

Music 201, 202 6 

Music 211, 212 2 

Music 231, 232 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

Physical Education 1 



32 



33 



Junior S.H. 

Applied Music 331-332 4 

Music 301, 302 4 

Psychology 221 3 

Music 355, 356 4 

Music 455-456 4 

Music Electives 8 

College Electives 3 



30 



Senior S.H. 

Applied Music 431-432 4 

Music 401-402 4 

Music 551 2 

Music 557-558 4 

Music 552 2 

Music Electives 9 

College Electives 3 



28 



BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

A nonprofessional course planned for students who wish to pursue 
music without the specialization required for the Bachelor of Music 
courses. All requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree must be met. 
All electives must be chosen from the field of liberal arts. 



Freshman S.H. 

Music 101, 102 6 

Applied Music 109-110 4 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Health 101 3 

Physical Education 1 



Sophomore S.H. 

Music 201, 202 6 

Applied Music 209-210 4 

English 211-212 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Social Science 6 

Elective 2 

Physical Education 1 



32 



31 



School of Music 201 

Junior S.H. Senior S.H. 

Music 231, 232 6 Music 401-402, Composition 4 

Applied Music 309-310 4 Applied Music 409-410 4 

Science or Mathematics 6 Science or Mathematics 6 

Music 301, 302 4 Electives 16 

Electives 9 — 

— 30 

29 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

100. College Choir 

Membership in the choir is open to any student having a voice of 
fair effectiveness, a correct ear, and some knowledge of musical nota- 
tion. Two rehearsals each week. Credit, one semester hour for the year. 
Mr. Thompson. 

101, 102. Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

The individuality and unity of melody, harmony, and rhythm as 
elements of music expression. The course aims to develop the ability to 
recognize, in aural analysis, all the diatonic harmonies in both major 
and minor modes, and to employ them in harmonization of both given 
and original melodies. Emphasis is placed upon the conscious musical 
fact rather than upon the written symbol; hence much original work 
is required. Required of freshmen in the School of Music. Elective for 
students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Three hours. Credit, three 
semester hours each semester. Miss Cowling. 

111-112. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Singing and aural analysis of diatonic melodic and harmonic struc- 
tures to include all triads and the dominant seventh chord. Required of 
freshmen in the School of Music. Two hours for the year. Credit, four 
semester hours for the year. Mr. H. AtKisson. 

127r. Music Appreciation 

Planned to help the nonmusic student to listen intelligently to music. 
No technical knowledge of music is required for entrance. The instru- 
ments of the symphony orchestra, the various forms of musical com- 
position and the standard symphonic literature. Elective in Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science courses for freshmen and sophomores. 
Three hours. Credit, three semeter hours. Mr. Thompson. 

150. College Orchestra 

Players of orchestral instruments are admitted to membership if 
they are able to pass tests given by the conductor. Two rehearsals each 
week. Credit, one semester hour for the year. Mr. Dickieson. 



202 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

200. Ensemble Playing 

Participation in performance of chamber music. Elective for quali- 
fied players on permission of the dean. Two rehearsals each week. Credit, 
two semester hours for the year. Staff. 

201, 202. Advanced Harmony and Keyboard Harmony 

Application of the principles outlined in Music 101, 102 to the study 
of altered chords, chromatic harmonies, remote and enharmonic modu- 
lations. Analysis of Bach Chorales and Grieg Op. 66, etc., as a basis 
for the study of the principles of musical form and harmonic analysis. 
Practice in original composition. Required of sophomores in the School 
of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101, 102. Three hours for the year. Credit, three se- 
mester hours each semester. Mr. H. AtKisson. 

211-212. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

The singing, recognition, and writing from dictation of chords of 
the seventh, altered chords, modulation, and more difficult rhythms, in- 
cluding two- and three-part dictation in both major and minor. Required 
of sophomores in the School of Music. Prerequisite, Music 111-112. One 
hour. Credit, two semester hours for the year. Mr. H. AtKisson. 

231, 232. History of Music 

First semester. A general survey of music history before the Chris- 
tian era. A more detailed study of the music and of music history from 
the beginning of the Christian era to the culmination of the polyphonic 
school as represented in the monumental works of J. S. Bach. Through 
the records and scores of the Carnegie Music Library much of the 
great music of all periods is available for illustration and study. 

Second semester. A study of the musical development from 1750 to 
the present time. Knowledge of the historical background of important 
works by the great classic and romantic composers and an intimate ac- 
quaintance with these works are required. Required of sophomores in 
the School of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts course. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours each semester. Miss Cowling. 

301. Counterpoint 

Sixteenth-century model polyphony to include three-part writing. 
Required of all juniors in the School of Music with the exception of 
majors in Music Education. Prerequisites, Music 201, 202. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. H. AtKisson. 

302. Counterpoint 

Sixteenth-century model polyphony in four to ten parts. Composi- 
tion in the style using canon and intertable imitation. The latter part 
of the semester is devoted to the application of the principles of contra- 
puntal composition in later periods. Required of all juniors in the School 
of Music. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
H. AtKisson. 



School of Music 203 

311-312. Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 

Emphasis on the reading of part work suitable for glee clubs and 
chorus work in grammar grades and high school. Special attention to 
harmonic dictation as it bears on the problem of chorus singing. Re- 
quired of juniors majoring in Music Education or in Voice. Prerequisite, 
Music 211-212. One hour. Credit, two semester hours for the year. Mr. 
H. AtKisson. 

315. Elementary School Music Methods 

Principles and procedures for carrying on the music program in the 
elementary grades. Considerable research and observation in the Gurry 
School are included. Required of juniors in Music Education. Open to 
juniors and seniors majoring in Applied Music. Prerequisites, Music 
101, 102, 111, 112. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Holloway. 

323-324. Choir Conducting 

The organization and training of church choirs, the technique of 
conducting and playing the organ at the same time, and a study of 
various liturgies. This course presents a survey of the best material 
available for the average quartet or chorus choir. Required of all stu- 
dents majoring in Organ. Junior and senior elective for students hav- 
ing had one year of organ study. Two hours. Credit, four semester 
hours for the year. Mr. Thompson. 

325-326. Voice Technique 

Special attention given to voice building, careful study of diction. 
Required of juniors in Music Education. One hour for the year. Credit, 
two semester hours for the year. Mrs. Wold. 

327. Music Appreciation 

This course will be adapted to the needs of the general college stu- 
dent who wishes to obtain a better understanding of music as an ele- 
ment of liberal culture and to develop the power of listening intelli- 
gently. No technical knowledge is required for entrance. The follow- 
ing subjects will be studied: the orchestra and orchestral instruments, 
the materials of music, the fundamental music forms as illustrated in 
the standard orchestral literature. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science courses. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

328. The Music Dramas of Richard Wagner 

The operas of Richard Wagner, beginning with the early operas, 
"Lohengrin" and "Tannhauser," continuing with an intensive study of 
the Nibelungen Ring Cycle, and culminating with "Tristan and Isolde" 
and "Parsifal." The recordings and scores of the Carnegie Music Li- 
brary will be used in this course, which will be largely adapted to the 
broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera House. A brief survey of the 
history of opera from its beginning in 1600 to the time of Wagner will 



204 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

precede the study of Wagnerian operas. Elective open to juniors and 
seniors who have had Music 127 or 327. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

(Offered in 1953-1954 and alternate years.) 

329. Music Appreciation, Twentieth-Century Music 

A continuation of Music 327, with emphasis on the music of the con- 
temporary composers, such as Sibelius, Schoenberg, Shostakovich, Hinde- 
mith, Stravinsky, Bartok, de Falla, Poulenc, Honegger, Milhaud, and 
others of the European school, and the American composers of the 
twentieth century. Elective for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who 
have had Music 127 or 327. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

(Offered in 1954-1955 and alternate years.) 

335, 336. Orchestral Instruments 

First semester. Woodwind and Brass. Class instruction. Each stu- 
dent is given opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of several in- 
struments — a knowledge which will be useful to a student if she expects 
to direct school orchestras. Mr. H. AtKisson. 

Second semester. Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass. Class instruction. The 
object of this course is to give the student a working knowledge of the 
stringed instruments. It aims also to prepare her to organize and con- 
duct ensemble classes. Required of juniors in Music Education. Two 
hours. Credit, two semester hours each semester. Miss Cowling, Miss 
Erickson. 

338. Community Music 

Attention is given to the means of utilizing the emotional, social, 
and therapeutic effects of music in the many phases of community life 
as it functions in the various community situations: in industry, com- 
mercial groups, hospitals, character-building organizations, camps, and 
so on. Elective for juniors and seniors in any course. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holloway. 

341-342. Public School Music 

First semester. Fundamentals of music theory and sight-reading 
necessary for primary grade teachers — study of the child voice, rote 
songs, problems, and materials of music in grades one to three. 

Second semester. Fundamentals of music theory and sight-reading 
necessary for intermediate and upper grade teachers — study of prob- 
lems and music materials in grades four to six. Required for Bachelor 
of Arts students majoring in elementary education. Three hours. Credit, 
three semester hours each semester. Miss Holloway. 



School of Music 205 

345-346. Piano Teaching Methods 

Classification of fundamental teaching materials and the best methods 
of presentation to the child mind. Notation, sight-reading, ear-training, 
rhythm, technique, interpretation, melody writing, and musical games. 
Observation of children's classes. Open to juniors in the School of Music 
majoring in Piano. Prerequisite, Piano 201-202. Three hours. Credit, 
six semester hours for the year. Mrs. C. Atkisson. 

355. The Forms of Music 

Survey and analysis of the various principal forms of music for 
structure, texture, and content. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, 202. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

356. Analysis in Form and Harmony 

Principles of analysis. Review of the various chords, principles of 
modulation, etc., of classical harmony. Study of representative contem- 
porary harmonic practices to introduce the student to the recent har- 
monic innovations and trends. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, 202. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

357. 358. Violin Teaching Methods 

Classification of material and methods of presentation. Ability to 
teach both class groups and individual pupils through observation and 
practical experience. Open to juniors majoring in Violin. Three hours. 
Credit, six semester hours for the year. Mrs. L. AtKisson. 

401-402. Composition 

Required of seniors majoring in Applied Music except Voice. Pre- 
requisites, Music 101, 102, 301, S02, 355, 356. Practice in composition. 
Two hours. Credit, four semester hours for the year. Mr. Weisgarber. 

425-426. Voice Technique 

Continuation of Music 325-326. Required of seniors in Music Educa- 
tion. One hour. Credit, two semester hours for the year. Mrs. Wold. 

435. Orchestral Conducting 

The technique of the baton, the essential qualities of successful con- 
ducting with direct application to the handling of or chest al groups. 
Conducting practice, followed by detailed criticism by the class and by 
the instructor. Required of Music Education majors. Elective for 
juniors and seniors in the School of Music. Two hours, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dickieson. 

436. Choral Conducting 

The essentials of conducting with specific application to chorus direc- 
tion. Study of the adolescent voice, choral forms, and matters of inter- 
pretation. Coverage of choral literature. Arranging for small choral 



206 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

groups and practice in conducting followed by criticism by the class and 
by the teacher. Required for Music Education majors. Elective for 
juniors and seniors in the School of Music. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holroyd. 

445-446. Secondary School Music Methods 

A study of music in junior and senior high schools, including the 
course of study, classes in theory, history, and appreciation; choral and 
instrumental organizations; credit for outside study; extracurricular 
activities and public performances; and the relation of the supervisor 
to the community and to the various members of the school organiza- 
tion. Required of seniors in Music Education. Open to all seniors in 
the School of Music. Prerequisite, Music 315. Two hours. Credit, four 
semester hours for the year. Miss Holloway. 

455-456. Instrumentation 

Individual characteristics of orchestra instruments; building of the 
orchestral score. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, and 202. Two hours 
Credit, four semester hours for the year. Mr. Dickieson. 

4461-462. Student Piano Teaching 

Practice of the principles learned in the methods course by the teach- 
ing of children under the supervision and direction of the instructor of 
piano teaching methods. Observation of children's classes. Presentation 
of pupils in monthly recitals throughout the year. Open to seniors in 
the School of Music majoring in piano. Prerequisites, Music 3^5-3^6 
and Piano 301-302. Three hours. Credit, six semester hours for the year. 
Mrs. C. Atkisson. 

4463-464. Voice Methods and Student Teaching 

Analysis of problems in voice production and song interpretation. 
Evaluation of song literature. Observation of teaching and practice 
teaching. Elective for juniors and seniors majoring in Voice. Three 
hours. Credit, six semester hours for the year. Mr. DeVeny. 

465, 466. Student Teaching 

The study of current materials in music education, followed by the 
daily teaching in various grades and the high school of the Curry School, 
prepared for and supplemented by frequent conferences with super- 
visors for constructive criticism and planning of new work. Required 
of all seniors in Music Education. Elective for seniors in the School of 
Music whose minor subject is Music Education. Prerequisite, Music 315. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours each semester. Miss Holroyd, 
Mrs. L. AtKisson. 



4 Note: Music 461-462 or Music 463-464 or Music 467-468, having been elected at the 
beginning of the college year, must be pursued through both semesters before credit to- 
ward the degree is allowed for either semester of work. 



School of Music 207 

5467-468. Student Violin Teaching 

Application of the problems involved in Music 357, 358, through the 
teaching of children, under the supervision of the Violin department. 
Orchestra organization and routine through active membership in the 
college orchestra. Elective for seniors in the Violin department. Three 
hours. Credit, six semester hours for the year. Mrs. L. AtKisson. 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
AND GRADUATES 

501-502. Advanced Composition 

For the graduate and the occasional advanced undergraduate who 
has completed all the standard theory courses (Harmony, Counterpoint, 
Form, and Analysis), and Music 401-402 or the equivalent. Original 
composition in larger forms. Two hours. Credit, four semester hours 
for the year. Mr. Weisgarber. 

539. Advanced Conducting 

Designed to follow Music 435 or Music 436. May be elected only by 
permission of the dean of the School of Music. 

Advanced score reading. Conducting of music in larger forms, with 
detailed criticism of conducting technique in its relation to content of 
score. Prerequisite, Music 435 or 436 or the equivalent. Three hours. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

551. The Music of J. S. Bach 

A survey of J. S. Bach's works of all types, with an historical and 
technical study of the development of each of the forms used. An 
analytical study of at least one representative work of each type, with 
special emphasis on the B minor Mass and the St. Matthew's Passion. 
Required of majors in Theory. Elective for upper classmen in other 
Bachelor of Music courses. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, 202. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

552. Nineteenth-Century Romanticism 

A technical and biographical study of Berlioz, Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Brahms, Moussorgsky, and Tschaikowsky. Required of ma- 
jors in Theory. Elective for upperclassmen in other Bachelor of Music 
courses. Prerequisites, Music 101, 102, 201, 202. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Weisgarber. 

557-558. Orchestration 

This course is devoted to actual scoring of an advanced level for 
orchestra, and is designed to follow the course in Instrumentation (Mu- 



5 Note: Music 461-462 or Music 463-464 or Music 467-468, having been elected at the 
beginning of the college year, must be pursued through both semesters before credit to- 
ward the degree is allowed for either semester of work. 



208 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

sic 455-456) or its equivalent. Prerequisites, 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 
802, 355, 356, U55-U56. Required of graduates who have not completed 
the course as undergraduates. Two hours. Credit, four semester hours 
for the year. Mr. Weisgarber. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES 

521, 522. Seminar in Chamber Music Literature 

Special studies in the chamber music which constitutes the repertoire 
of the present day, with emphasis in the artistic motivations of the 
periods which produced the works selected for study. Prerequisite, His- 
tory of Music, six hours. Three hours. Credit, three semester hours 
each semester. Mr. Dickieson. 

525, 526. Eighteenth-Century Music 

Detailed coverage of the historical backgrounds in general history, 
literature, and the other fine arts of the period which culminated in 
the Classic School of composers, followed by analysis of the significant 
musical compositions produced by that school. Prerequisite 231-232. 
Three hours. Credit, three semester hours each semester. Staff. 

527. Nineteenth- Century Music 

A course involving research in the backgrounds of the Romantic 
Movement, and the forming of evaluations of the composition products 
of the periods. Designed to meet the needs of and confined to election 
by those graduates who are not music majors. Elective for students 
who are considered to have a background in music sufficiently broad to 
make the contents of the course intelligible to them. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cowling. 

537, 538. Advanced Applied Music 

Elective for the student who has not less than 16 hours of credit in 
courses for a given instrument and who is able to demonstrate quali- 
fications for advanced work. Two hours. Credit, two semester hours 
each semester. Staff. 

559, 560. Composition Seminar 

Designed for coverage of the contemporary styles of composition and 
of the writings which offer analysis of current trends. Free discussion 
of creative problems. Open only to students who have completed the 
standard theory courses and Music 401-402 or its equivalent. Two hours. 
Credit, two semester hours each semester. Mr. Weisgarber. 

591-592-593. Thesis 

Creation of a chamber music work or a work for full orchestra, or a 
cantata for solos, chorus and orchestra, along with a scholarly paper 
dealing with the work created. Credit, six semester hours. 



School of Music 209 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

"Applied Music" refers to the practical study of piano, organ, voice, 
violin, or orchestral instruments, in private individual lessons. Private 
lessons in applied music are available to students from other depart- 
ments whose courses of study admit of such extra work. 

A student will be accepted into a credit course in applied music only 
after she has passed a test in singing or playing before a committee of 
the music faculty. 

For Freshmen: 

101-102. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. Piano, Course C. 

103-104. Voice. Course B. 

107-108. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

109-110. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

113-114. Piano. Course B. 

117-118. Piano. Course D. 

121-122. Incidental Applied Music in all Courses. 

131-132. Applied Music for Course E. 

For Sophomores: 

201-202. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 

203-204. Voice. Course B. 

207-208. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

209-210. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

213-214. Piano. Course B. 

217-218. Piano. Course D. 

221-222. Incidental Applied Music in all Courses. 

231-232. Applied Music for Course E. 

For Juniors: 

301-302. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 

303-304. Voice. Course B. 

305-306. Voice. Course C. 

307-308. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

309-310. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

317-318. Minor Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

321-322. Incidental Applied Music in all Courses. 

331-332. Applied Music for Course E. 

For Seniors: 

401-402. Piano, Organ, Violin, Violoncello. Course A. 
403-404. Voice. Course B. 
405-406. Voice. Course C. 



210 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

407-408. Major Orchestral Instrument. Course D. 

409-410. Applied Music. Bachelor of Arts in Music Course. 

417-418. Minor Applied Music. Course D. 

421-422. Incidental Applied Music in all Courses. 

431-432. Applied Music for Course E. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The list of requirements in applied music as given below is not a 
complete statement of work needed to satisfy credit standards. The com- 
positions mentioned are to be interpreted merely as symbols of stages 
of advancement. A committee of music faculty members will decide 
upon each student's qualifications for entrance or advancement. 

PIANO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales and arpeggios at 
moderate tempi; Etudes, such as Czerny 299; Heller op. 47; Little Pre- 
ludes and Fugues, Bach; easier Two-part Inventions, Bach; composi- 
tions by standard composers equivalent in difficulty to Mozart, Sonata 
in C Major, No. 3; Haydn, Sonata in G minor, No. 11; Beethoven, So- 
nata op. 49, No. 2. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 108. Major and 
minor, dominant seventh and diminished seventh arpeggios. M.M. 72; 
trill one, two, four, eight notes, M.M. 60; legato and staccato octaves at 
moderate speed. Czerny, op. 299 and Cramer; Bach, Two-part Inven- 
tions, early sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, compositions of equal 
difficulty from romantic and modern schools. Three hours. Credit, six 
semester hours for the year. 

Sophomore Year: Technical work continued; scale M.M. 132. Cra- 
mer; Czerny op. 740; Bach, Three-part Inventions; easier dance move- 
ments from French suites; Beethoven Sonatas op. 14, No. 1; op. 14, 
No. 2; romantic and modern compositions. Three hours. Credit, six 
semester hours for the year. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 144; scales in thirds, 
sixths, tenths, M.M. 132; other technical work continued. Czerny, op. 
740; Clementi, Gradus and Parnassum; French and English suites; 
easier preludes and fugues from W. T. C, Bach; more difficult Bee- 
thoven sonatas; compositions by Schumann, Schubert, Chopin, Brahms, 
Liszt, Debussy, Bartok, and other contemporary composers. Five hours. 
Credit, ten semester hours for the year. 

Senior Year: Technical work continued; Bach, preludes and fugues 
from W. T. C; Chopin Etudes, a wide repertoire embracing a sonata, 
concerto, and pieces by classic, romantic, and modern composers. Grad- 
uation recital appearance. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for 
the year. 



School of Music 211 

VOICE COURSE 

Freshman Year: Voice classification. Tone production and diction 
study. Song literature from the Italian operatic and oratorio repertoire 
of the seventeenth century. Study of Old English classics. Two hours. 
Credit, four semester hours for the year. 

Sophomore Year: Emphasis on development of legato singing and 
flexibility as elements of technique. Choice of song literature determined 
in large measure by state of development in the use of foreign lan- 
guages. Two hours. Credit, four semester hours for the year. 

Junior Year: Emphasis on vocal agility, volume, range, and quality 
of tone. Third year of study should disclose the potentialities of the 
voice. In addition to study of more advanced works in foreign lan- 
guages, modern American and English songs are given increased atten- 
tion. Operatic and oratorio arias required at this stage of development. 
Four hours. Credit, eight semester hours for the year. 

Senior Year: The main emphasis is upon the interpretive aspects 
of singing and development of the student's capacity to sing with style 
and distinction. The repertoire is general and is governed by special 
capabilities of the student. A graduation recital appearance is required. 
Four hours. Credit, eight semester hours for the year. 

VIOLIN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: The student should be able to pursue to her 
advantage the study of the 42 Etudes of Kreutzer. A previous thorough 
study of the Kayser op. 20, the Mazas Special Studies, and the Dont 
Exercises Preparatory to Kreutzer is recommended. 

Freshman Year: Careful review of previous technical study. Sevcik 
trill studies. Kreutzer etudes. Three octave scales and arpeggios. Con- 
certos of Bach, Viotti. Three hours. Credit, six semester hours for the 
year. 

Sophomore Year: Kreutzer and Fiorillo etudes, double stop studies. 
Concertos, Spohr, No. 2; Viotti, No. 22. Three hours. Credit, six sem- 
ester hours for the year. 

Junior Year: Rode Caprices. Concertos, Bruch, Mendelssohn; so- 
natas, Tartini and Corelli. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for 
the year. 

Senior Year: Bach solo sonatas. Selected great concertos and so- 
natas. Smaller modern works. Graduation recital appearance. Viola 
study required. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for the year. 



212 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

VIOLONCELLO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales in two octaves; 
ability to play musically the Corelii Sonata in D minor, or a classic 
work of similar type; technical ability to play the Goltermann Concerto 
No. 4 or the equivalent. The student should be in a position to pursue 
to her advantage the course for the freshman year outlined below. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales in three octaves; scales in 
broken thirds and arpeggios (Klengel, Technical Studies, Vol. I) ; Lee, 
Op. 31, Book II; Dotzauer, 113 Exercises for Violoncello, Book II. Bach, 
Suite I in G Major. Sonatas by Corelii, Eccles, Handel, Marcello. Pieces 
by Bach, Goltermann, Popper, etc. Three hours. Credit, six semester 
hours for the year. 

Sophomore Year: Major and minor scales in four octaves; scales 
in thirds and arpeggios. Merk, Op. 11; Duport, 21 Etudes; Grutzmacher, 
Op. 38, Book I. Bach, Suite II in D minor. Sonatas by Sammartini, 
Mozart, Cassado, Beethoven (Op. 5, No. 1 or 2), Mendelssohn, Strauss. 
Boellmann, Symphonic Variations. Pieces by Bach, Faure, Guerini, Men- 
delssohn (Op. 17), Saint-Saens, etc. Three hours. Credit, six semester 
hours for the year. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales in sixth, octaves, and double 
stops. Grutzmacher, Op. 38, Book II; Franchomme, Op. 7; Piatti, Op. 
25. Bach, Suite III in C major. Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 69), Grieg, 
Rachmaninoff. Concertos by Boccherini and d' Albert, Lalo or Saint- 
Saens. Pieces by Bach, Bloch, Granados, Senaille, Schumann (Op. 70, 
73, or 102), etc. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for the year. 

Senior Year: Major and minor scales with spiccato and other special 
bowings. Orchestral studies, Bach, Suite IV in E-flat major or Suite V 
in C minor. Sonatas by Beethoven (Op. 102, No. 1 or 2), Brahms (Op. 
38), Debussy, Delius. Concertos by Haydn and Elgar or Schumann. 
Pieces by Bach, Beethoven (Variations), Bloch, Cassado, Chopin (Op. 
3), Dvorak, etc. Graduation recital appearance. Five hours. Credit, ten 
semester hours for the year. 



ORGAN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: The completion of the freshman require- 
ments in Piano of this College or their equivalent. 

Second Year: The foundations of organ technique are laid by the 
study of simple exercises in legato, pedal, and manual playing by 
Stainer, followed by the Caspar Koch Pedal Scales, the completion of 
at least four of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues by Bach, easy 
preludes and offertories, and intensive study of the art of hymn playing. 
Three hours. Credit, six semester hours for the year. 



School of Music 213 

Third Year : Completion of the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues by 
Bach, and at least two of the more difficult preludes and fugues, such 
as the Cathedral Preludes and Fugue in E minor, and the Short G 
minor Fugue, one of the easier sonatas by Mendelssohn or Guilmant, 
standard pieces of the German and French school. Choir accompani- 
ments. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for the year. 

Fourth Year: Larger preludes and fugues by Bach, sonatas and 
compositions by Widor, Vierne, Bonnet, Karg-Elert, and others of the 
modern school. Oratorio accompaniments. Graduation recital appear- 
ance. Five hours. Credit, ten semester hours for the year. 



COURSE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

To major in Music Education, the student must have completed the 
work of the freshman year in the School of Music, including fresh- 
man piano; must have an acceptable singing voice; a high degree of 
skill in sight-singing and ear-training; and a personality that shows 
promise of successful teaching ability. 



RECITALS 

RECITAL ATTENDANCE 

Students pursuing regular courses in the School of Music are re- 
quired to attend all faculty and student recitals and the performances 
of the College Concert Course. 

STUDENT RECITALS 

Student recitals are given weekly, at which time works studied in 
the classroom are performed before the students of the School of Music. 
All students majoring in music are required to attend these recitals 
and to take part in them when requested to do so. These public appear- 
ances are of great assistance in enabling the student to acquire the 
poise essential to a successful public performance. 

ARTIST RECITALS AND CONCERTS 

No less important than classroom instruction is the opportunity of 
hearing good music performed by artists of superior ability. To afford 
students this opportunity, a regular series of recitals and concerts is 
given annually, the best artists available being secured. 

Recitals and concerts are given frequently during the school year 
by members of the music faculty. 



214 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

CARNEGIE MUSIC LIBRARY 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York City in 1935 awarded to 
the Woman's College a "College Music Set" consisting of a library of 
826 records, 250 music scores, 125 books on music history and apprecia- 
tion, and a Capehart reproducing machine. This award is valued at 
$2,750. 

Two rooms in the Music Building have been set aside as a library 
to house this valuable collection. The library is kept open daily, not 
only for the students of the music history and appreciation classes, but 
also for students and members of the College community who may wish 
to acquaint themselves with the music of the great masters. 

The college music set has been greatly amplified, the present collec- 
tion housed in the Music Building amounting to some 3000 records. 
Numerous records in the College library are also available for use. 



ANNUAL HIGH-SCHOOL MUSIC CONTEST-FESTIVAL 

One of the major activities sponsored by the School of Music for 
the improvement of music in the state is the Annual North Carolina 
Music Contest-Festival for High Schools. District elimination contests 
for the town and consolidated high schools are held in six centers in 
the state, and those schools with high scores in these district contests 
enter the annual state contest held at the College in April of each year. 
These annual performances have given the music teachers, supervisors, 
and students a splendid opportunity to compare their work with that 
done in the other schools. The contest has in this way made a real con- 
tribution to the rapid development of music in the schools of the state. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

THE COLLEGE CHOIR 

The College Choir is composed of one hundred and fifty college stu- 
dents, selected from the entire student body. The choir sings in chapel 
many times during the year, for the four university sermons, the bacca- 
laureate sermon, and other important college events. In addition, at 
least two special concerts are given each year, one a special Christmas 
concert, the other an Easter program. Two weekly rehearsals are held, 
and credit of one semester hour is given for the year. 

THE orchestra 

Membership in the College Orchestra is open to all students who 
play an orchestral instrument sufficiently well to meet the requirements 
of the director. Two rehearsals are held each week throughout the col- 
lege year, and attendance is required of students who are studying an 



School op Music 215 

orchestral instrument. Public concerts are given during the college year 
as often as circumstances warrant. Credit of one semester hour is given 
for the year. 

PI KAPPA LAMBDA 

Membership in this national honorary scholastic society is the high- 
est honor that can come to a student in the School of Music. Election 
of students is from the senior class, with an occasional election from 
the junior class, and is based primarily on superior ability and attain- 
ment. Alumnae and faculty members of the School of Music who have 
achieved special distinction in the field of music are eligible for election 
to membership. 

THE CHAMBER MUSIC PLAYERS 

This group, usually numbering from fifteen to eighteen advanced 
players, specializes in the large chamber music works of both classic 
and contemporary types. It has presented in public many rarely heard 
compositions for strings and for string and woodwind instruments. 

MUSIC EDUCATION CLUB 

The Music Education Club is an organization of the Music Educa- 
tion Department. Membership of the club is made up of sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors who are majoring or minoring in music education 
and faculty members of this department. Freshmen interested in music 
education may be associate members. The club's activities are planned 
to enrich the musical experience of the members and to broaden their 
interest and pride in their prospective profession, to familiarize them 
with current developments in the field of music education, and to pro- 
mote musical interest and activities on the campus. 



VIII. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE DIVISION 

Gordon Gray, B.A., LL.B., LL.D., President of the University. 
Edward Kidder Graham, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor. 
William Whatley Pierson, Ph.D., Litt.D., Dean, Graduate School. 
Franklin H. McNutt, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Associate Dean. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

Helen Barton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Victor M. Cutter, B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

Marc Friedlaender, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Vance T. Littlejohn, B.A., B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Professor of Business 

Education. 
Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Professor of Physical Education. 
Franklin H. McNutt, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Education. 
Mereb E. Mossman, B.A., M.A., Professor of Sociology. 
Charles E. Prall, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Katherine E. Roberts, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Home Economics. 

ORGANIZATION 

Under a principle of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
known as "allocation of function," the Woman's College Division of the 
Graduate School of the University is authorized to conduct graduate 
study in the following areas: the Creative Arts Program (Painting and 
Graphic Arts, Music Composition, Writing, and Dance), Business Educa- 
tion, Education, Home Economics, and Sociology (a minor). These areas 
and the Division as a whole are represented in and subject to the 
Graduate Executive Council of the Consolidated University. Funda- 
mental policy and basic regulations are formulated by this Council and 
may be found in the Graduate School Series of the University of North 
Carolina Record. 

The administration of the Woman's College Division of the Graduate 
School is vested in an Administrative Board and an Associate Dean of 
the Graduate School. The Board, headed by the Associate Dean, trans- 
acts local graduate business within the framework of regulations estab- 
lished by the Graduate Executive Council of the Consolidated University. 
The Associate Dean serves as entrance examiner and performs through 
his office the customary duties. 

216 



The Graduate School 217 

Additional rules, regulations, and standards peculiar to each of the 
areas of graduate study are established and administered by the de- 
partment or school concerned. These added standards appear in the ap- 
propriate sections of the catalogue. The prospective student should 
read such sections with care. 

Inquiries concerning curricula, specific courses, scholarships, fellow- 
ships, and information peculiar to a field of study should be sent di- 
rectly to the department or school concerned. General information may 
be obtained from the office of the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Admission to Graduate Study: For unconditional admission to 
graduate study, the applicant must hold a bachelor's degree from a rec- 
ognized institution. The transcript must show an appropriate under- 
graduate major and satisfactory academic standing. Students from un- 
recognized or marginal institutions may be given provisional admission 
pending the removal of conditions imposed. All candidates for admission 
must take the Graduate Record Examination, or under certain circum- 
stances and with the consent of the Associate Dean, the National 
Teacher Examinations. Certain students who are not candidates for a 
degree may be admitted as specials. 

Residence and Time Limits: The master's curriculum, including the 
thesis, must be completed within six calendar years. At least three- 
fourths of the work must be done in campus courses; as much as one- 
fourth of the course work may be taken in extension except in curricula 
leading to the Master of Education where the limit is six semester 
hours; not more than six semester hours are accepted by transfer. 
However, in many of the curricula the student is permitted and en- 
couraged to do a portion of his work at State College at Raleigh, North 
Carolina, or at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 
general, such work taken at another unit of the Consolidated University 
should not exceed one-third of the total program. 

Required Skills: For all Master's degrees except the Master of 
Education, the student must master an appropriate skill prior to mak- 
ing application for admission to candidacy. These are either aesthetics 
(Creative Arts Program), a reading knowledge of a modern foreign 
language, or, under certain cirmumstances, the fundamentals of statis- 
tics. 

Admission to Candidacy: After approximately one-third of his 
course work is completed, the student may apply to the Administrative 
Board for admission to candidacy for the degree sought. Admission is 
conditioned upon: (a) the removal of all entrance conditions, (b) com- 
petence in the use of the appropriate skill, (c) quality of the graduate 
work already completed, and (d) satisfaction of special requirements of 
the department concerned. 



218 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Curriculum : The course hour requirements vary somewhat with the 
graduate degree sought, viz., Master of Fine Arts and the Master of 
Arts in Education, thirty-six semester hours of which twenty-four must 
be in a major field and twelve in a related minor; Master of Education, 
thirty-two semester hours of which twenty must be in a major field, six 
in a minor, and six in a variable which may fall within the major or 
minor fields or in a related department; Master of Science, thirty semes- 
ter hours of which twenty must be in the major field and ten in the 
minor. 

Written Examination on the Major Field: The written examina- 
tion on the field of the major is set by the student's advisory committee 
and may be scheduled at any convenient time after two-thirds of the 
course work has been completed. 

Oral Examination: The oral examination is conducted by a special 
committee including the student's adviser as chairman and at least two 
other representatives of the major and minor subjects. It covers the 
entire work of the student, both major and minor, with time especially 
reserved for the defense of the thesis. No oral examination is required 
of candidates for the Master of Education. 

Thesis: A thesis subject endorsed by the chairman of the student's 
advisory committee must be presented to the Administrative Board for 
approval at least one semester prior to the time the degree is expected 
to be awarded. The thesis must be related to the graduate major and 
must be written in correct English and in a scholarly form. Four copies 
must be filed at least one month prior to the date the degree is expected. 
An abstract must accompany the thesis. No thesis is required of can- 
didates for the Master of Education. 

In the Creative Arts Program the thesis shall consist of a creative 
work on the professional level and of technical merit, and the back- 
ground of sources, historical influences, technical processes or composi- 
tional problems essential to its scholarly interpretation. 



EXPENSE 

Inasmuch as the graduate curricula herein described are curricula 
of the Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Caro- 
lina, culminating in graduate degrees conferred by the University, they 
are open to men graduate students. However, the Woman's College 
does not open its campus facilities to men students, who are expected 
to find board, room, medical, and recreational facilities off campus. 



The Graduate School 219 

In State Out of State 

a. Charges Common to Men and Women Graduates 

Tuition (2 semesters) $150.00 $360.00 

Registration 15.00 15.00 

Entertainment 9.50 9.50 

Diploma 10.00 10.00 

Student Union 6.00 6.00 

b. Fees Required of Graduate Women 

Medical 10.00 10.00 

c. Optional Services for Graduate Women 

Board 270.00 270.00 

Room 60.00 60.00 

Laundry 30.00 30.00 

Payment of expenses of graduate students will be due as follows, 
in advance: 

In State Out of State 
a. For students who board in residence halls : 

Room reservation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

On entrance 145.00 210.00 

November 15 130.00 180.00 

January 15 145.00 210.00 

March 15 120.50 150.50 



$550.50 $760.50 

b. For students who do not board in residence halls : 

On entrance 50.00 105.00 

November 15 45.25 95.25 

January 15 50.00 105.00 

March 15 45.25 95.25 



$190.50 $400.50 

c. For men students each payment will be $2.50 less than specified for 
women under the preceding section, because medical service is not 
provided for men. 

A diploma fee of $10 is to be paid by March 15 of the year in which 
the student will complete requirements for his or her degree. 

Music and laboratory fees are in addition to the charges outlined 
above. 

The college reserves the right to increase any fees and charges at 
any time such advance is authorized by the proper authorities. 



220 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Graduate students who take more than nine semester hours pay full 
tuition. For those who take nine semester hours or less, the charge is 
$5.00 per semester hour for bona fide residents of North Carolina and 
$12.00 per semester hour for all others. 

Dormitory facilities for graduate women are limited. Women stu- 
dents who want to reside on the campus should apply to the Dean of 
Students, Miss Katherine Taylor, for a room as soon as their application 
for admission to the Graduate School has been approved by the Grad- 
uate Office. 



GRADUATE CURRICULA 

THE CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAM 

The program is designed to meet the need for work of graduate 
grade with a clear emphasis upon composition in the fields of painting 
and the graphic arts, music, writing, and the dance. Completion of the 
degree program will presuppose the attainment of a professional level 
of competence in composition in the art form in which the student elects 
to major. 

The program consists of work in one of the four major subjects and 
in a related minor culminating in the degree, Master of Fine Arts. 
Available at the Woman's College are an interdepartmental minor in 
the creative arts and minors in art history, painting and the graphic 
arts, literature, writing, music literature and history, and the dance. 
Related minors are also available at the University at Chapel Hill and 
at State College in Raleigh. 

The establishment of this graduate program at Greensboro reflects 
the conviction that distinctive advantages for the pursuit of graduate 
work in the creative arts are present here. The Woman's College is a 
residential liberal arts college which has for a number of years given 
emphasis to work in the several arts and which possesses facilities ade- 
quate to support graduate study. The opportunity is present for in- 
dividualized instruction from the strong staff of resident artist-teachers. 

The program should be of value to those who wish to teach in sec- 
ondary schools and colleges as well as to those preparing for profes- 
sional careers in one of the arts. Adequate supporting courses in the 
literature of each of the arts are offered together with courses which 
meet the state requirements for graduate certification. 

Painting and Graphic Arts 

The major in Painting and the Graphic Arts offers opportunity for 
work in drawing and painting, etching, lithography, serigraphy, wood- 



Graduate Curricula 221 

block printing and engraving", the choice of medium for specialization 
being determined by the training and interests of the student. Instruc- 
tion will be given in small classes or on an individual basis, emphasiz- 
ing the development of creative ability grounded in adequate research 
of both an historical and a technical nature. 

Adequate studio space, equipment, illustrative material and library 
facilities are available for carrying on instruction at the graduate level. 

In addition to general requirements listed elsewhere, it is desirable 
that the student electing a major program in Painting and Graphic 
Arts should have 54 semester hours or the equivalent in undergraduate 
credits in art with a distribution of courses showing 15 semester hours 
in art history, six semester hours in design, 18 semester hours in draw- 
ing and painting, and 15 semester hours in art electives. 

The culmination of the program in Painting and the Graphic Arts 
will be an exhibition, showing the creative power and technical ability 
of the student and a paper interpreting or outlining the nature of the 
original contribution, or which deals with sources, historical influences 
or compositional problems. 

Music Composition 

In the field of music, the Program offers the opportunity to those 
who have given evidence of ability in composition to continue their 
creative work under expert direction, and to extend their knowledge of 
related arts forms. 

The Greensboro Orchestra, the college choral groups, the String 
Quartet, the Piano Trio, and various chamber music organizations, will 
be available for laboratory use. All of these organizations are accus- 
tomed and congenial to the performance of contemporary works, and 
each has won praise from distinguished composers for its efforts. The 
college now holds more than 5,000 phonograph records of various types 
which may be used as aids to study in conjunction with the college's 
collection of scores of the important works of contemporary and classic 
composers. 

The major interest in the graduate program will be active composi- 
tion with the creation of an original work for orchestra, a cantata for 
chorus, orchestra and solo voices, or a chamber music work as a goal. 
This composition, along with a scholarly paper designed to demonstrate 
that composition technique has reached a conscious and critical level, 
will constitute the required thesis. 

Adequate preparation in harmony, counterpoint, form and analysis, 
and history of music, will be required for admission to the graduate 
program in composition. Manuscripts of works previously done will be 
used as basis for judgment concerning the wisdom of further pursuit 
of creative skill in this field. 



222 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Writing 

The major in Writing offers opportunity to those who have demon- 
strated ability in this field to develop their powers under the guidance 
of writers of distinction, and to support this work in original compo- 
sition with graduate study in related art forms or in literature and 
criticism. 

The Writing program provides for specialization in the writing of 
fiction; novel, novelette, or short story; in the writing of verse; in 
critical writing, or in playwriting. The required thesis will consist of 
original work in one of these fields together with a scholarly paper 
providing an account of the research problems involved or an inter- 
pretative study which includes a discussion of the theme chosen, the 
problem presented by it, the processes followed in developing it, and 
the methods used in executing it. 

For admission to the graduate major in Writing the student must 
have completed successfully at least eighteen semester hours of courses 
in English and American literature above Grade I, and a minimum of 
six semester hours in courses in writing, of which three may be in ad- 
vanced composition and three in the writing of fiction or of verse, or in 
play-writing. In addition, the student must submit papers which offer 
evidence of a structural competence, artistic merit, and a promising 
talent. 



Dance 

The major in Dance provides opportunities for the graduate student 
in dance to study and experiment in the arts with special emphasis on 
dance as a creative art form. The curriculum is planned to present ex- 
periences and develop competency in choreography through the utiliza- 
tion of the integrated knowledge of the related arts and experimenta- 
tion with various types of composition. The student is directed in the 
development of mature composition of aesthetic merit and in the attain- 
ment of technical excellence. 

Dance studios, practice rooms, pianos, phonographs, percussion in- 
struments, music and records, stage and lighting equipment, costume 
and design rooms, films and motion picture equipment, are available to 
the graduate student for use in experimentation in dance. Library 
collections of books and related materials for creative work in dance 
are extensive and comprehensive. 

The graduate program culminates in a dance concert of the candi- 
date's own choreography to be performed with a professional and 
scholarly solution of the problems of a theatrical and educational dance 
production. 



Graduate Curricula 223 

Admission to graduate study in this field will be made on the basis 
of competence and merit as evidence by the undergraduate record and 
a proficiency and promising talent as demonstrated by the student. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The graduate program in business education for the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina is centered in Greensboro at the Woman's 
College division. The major emphasis is on business teacher education 
with related subject matter content in business and economics courses. 
Students are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to take 
part of their course work at the Chapel Hill division of the Consoli- 
dated University. 

The program is designed to prepare master teachers of business 
subjects at the secondary school level and the junior and senior col- 
lege levels. The teacher-training function of the North Carolina Dis- 
tributive Education Service is an integral part of the graduate program 
in business education. Students may concentrate in the field of dis- 
tributive education or in the fields of professional teacher education for 
teachers of general basic business education and teachers of office edu- 
cation and the secretarial and office skills. 

Close relationship is maintained with the public schools of North 
Carolina and with business and industry through such organizations as 
the National Office Management Association and the Merchants' Asso- 
ciation. Teachers of office and distributive education are encouraged to 
secure meaningful work experience through a co-ordinated program with 
business and industry. 

In addition to complying with the general regulations for uncondi- 
tional admission to the graduate program, students majoring in busi- 
ness education must have a grade A certificate to teach business in 
North Carolina, or its equivalent. Also, the undergraduate credit must 
include courses in general economics and the principles of accounting. 

The major work must be distributed between professional and sub- 
ject-matter courses with a related minor selected on the basis of the 
student's background and interest. The master's degree in business 
education requires thirty to thirty-three semester hours credit in ap- 
proved courses depending upon the program elected. 

Students majoring in Business Education may elect a program 
leading to the Master of Science degree or the Master of Education 
degree. The requirements of the program leading to the Master of 
Science degree include a tool of research (language or statistics) and 
a thesis related to the student's field of major interest. No thesis is 
required of Master of Education degree candidates. 



224 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

EDUCATION 

Inasmuch as the elementary teacher, supervisor, or principal must 
be all things to all pupils, the graduate major in education is very 
broad. However, it is possible within this broad major to give a degree 
of specialization for primary, intermediate, and upper grade teachers; 
also for supervisors and principals including those who may head con- 
solidated schools composed of all grades. Further specialization is made 
possible through the intelligent selection of a minor. A wide range of 
minors are available at Woman's College, the University at Chapel Hill, 
and State College at Raleigh. 

The facilities for graduate study in this field are excellent. There is 
a strong undergraduate major, an on-campus demonstration and experi- 
mental school, excellent library facilities, and cordial and co-operative 
relationships with the excellent city and county systems. Guilford with 
its two cities, Greensboro and High Point, is one of the most populous 
counties in the state. Community resources related to graduate study 
in education are unrivaled. 

In addition to meeting the entrance requirements mentioned else- 
where in this catalogue, the student receiving unconditional admission 
must have met the basic teacher-certification requirement of North 
Carolina or the state of residence. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The School of Home Economics of the Woman's College is the cen- 
ter in North Carolina for graduate work in Home Economics. As a 
result of close co-operation with accrediting agencies, it has received 
state, regional, and national recognition. 

The opportunities for superior training are excellent. In addition 
to the original building, there is a large and completely equipped new 
wing with facilities for graduate study and research in the several areas 
of home economics, home economics education, and institution manage- 
ment. Three home management houses are available for research in 
housing and management. The plans for a new nursery school building 
are in process. It will be planned and equipped for graduate and re- 
search study. The home-making cottage and school cafeteria, operated 
in connection with the Curry Demonstration School, and the dining halls 
on the Woman's College campus offer unlimited facilities for co-ordinated 
graduate training. 

Curricula and Degrees 

Three graduate curricula and degrees are offered, each appropriate 
to the needs of a well-defined group of students. For the technician, 
dietitian, administrative officer or research worker, there is the Master 



Graduate Curricula 225 

of Science which permits a high degree of concentration on the knowl- 
edge and skills required; for the teacher, there is the Master of Edu- 
cation based on general home economics, home economics education and 
general education; for the teacher who desires some research experience 
in addition to her teacher preparation there is the Master of Science 
in Home Economics. The general requirements for the degrees are: 

Master of Science 

Major: Twenty semester hours in one of the following areas: (1) 
Child Development and Family Relations. (2) Clothing and Textiles. 
(3) Foods and Nutrition. (4) Housing and Management. 

Minor: Ten semester hours in any of the following areas: (1) Any 
area listed above that has not been selected as a major. (2) Institu- 
tion Management. (3) Art (related design). (4) Social Studies. (5) A 
split minor embracing not more than two of the areas listed above. 

Required Skill: An appropriate modern language. 

General Written Examination: This is based on the major and may 
be taken after two-thirds of the course work is completed. 

Thesis: A research problem that is based on the major. 

Oral Examination: This is based on the thesis. 

Master of Education 

Major: Twenty-six semester hours in general home economics and 
home economics education. Not less than twelve semester hours must 
be in home economics content. 

Minor: Six semester hours in general education. 

General Written Examination: This is based on both the major and 
minor fields, and may be taken after two-thirds of the course work is 
completed. 

Master of Science in Home Economics 

Major: Twenty semester hours of home economics. 

Minor: Ten semester hours of Education (Home Economics Educa- 
tion, General Education or a combination of the two), or ten semester 
hours in an area of Home Economics. 

Required Skill: An appropriate modern language or statistics. 

General Written Examination: This is based on the major and may 
be taken after two-thirds of the course work is completed. 



226 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Thesis: A research problem based on the major. 
Oral Examination: This is based on the thesis. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The Department of Sociology offers a graduate minor planned par- 
ticularly for students whose chief interest is in the field of Education. 
Emphasis is placed upon sociological analysis with the student's home 
community or Greensboro as a laboratory for sociological research and 
empirical analysis. An effort is made to analyze selected relevant and 
vital problems of contemporary society. 

For admission to the graduate minor in sociology, the student must 
have completed a course in Principles of Sociology, and an additional 
six semester hours of sociology or psychology. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The descriptions of courses open to graduate students in each of the 
several majors will be found in this catalogue under the heading of the 
appropriate department or school. Contributing to the graduate pro- 
gram are the departments of Art, Business Education, English, Physical 
Education, and Sociology, and the schools of Education, Home Eco- 
nomics, and Music. In each instance, the head or dean is also the chief 
adviser of graduate students in his field, and he or she is consequently 
the person to whom written inquiries concerning courses and programs 
should be addressed. 






IX DEGREES CONFERRED 

At the Sixtieth Annual Commencement of the 
College, June 2, 1952 

BACHELORS OF ART 

Mary Charles Alexander Rt. 1, Wilkesboro 

Patsy Lee Allen magna cum laude Canton 

Sonia Angstadt Charlotte 

Margaret Ann Arthur Kings Mountain 

Janice Pierce Atwood Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mary Gordon Austin Jefferson 

Elizabeth Anne Bachman Henderson 

Mary Johnson Bailey Rt. 2, Stantonsburg 

Bette Louise Barksdale Asheville 

Katherine Lee Barnes 1 Rt. 3, Fayetteville 

Mary Louise Barnes Wilson 

Dora Mae Barrett Farmville 

Bettie Brown Barringer Hickory 

Nancy Lou Barton Longmeadow, Mass. 

Frances Erleene Bason Greensboro 

Viola Daphne Batts Thomasville 

Elizabeth Dalby Baucom Rt. 2, Raleigh 

Virginia Lee Beck Burlington 

Peggy Lutricia Belton Mt. Airy 

Sarah Ella Bennett Rt. 2, Stokesdale 

Evelyn Moore Best Rt. 2, Wallace 

Mary Joyce Biggs Beaufort 

Corinne Miller Bissette Zebulon 

Pearle Marie Blake Lumberton 

Ruth Carolyn Blanchard Lowell 

Jacqueline Bodie Kannapolis 

Anita Ilese Bolinger cum laude Rt. 1, Vale 

Rosemary Clifford Boney magna cum laude Clinton 

Elizabeth William Boulus Concord 

Cleo Peggy Joyce Boyette Wilson 

Sarah Elizabeth Raney Bracken Charlotte 

Laura Mae Bradfield Dillon, S. C. 

Virginia Anne Bradford cum laude Marshville 

Sara Alice Breeden Morganton 

Essie Virginia Bridges Rt. 2, Forest City 

Coleen Belle Brock Fayetteville 

Doris Mae Brock Warsaw 

Dorothy Louise Morton Brown 2 Greensboro 

a Absent 

2 Dated July 20, 1961 

227 



228 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Margaret Elizabeth Brown Rt. 2, Rocky Mount 

Elizabeth Moore Bullard Charlotte 

Glenna June Byrd Marion 

Bessie Ruth Cartwright Hamptonville 

Ann Elizabeth Griffin Cate Rt. 2, Chapel Hill 

Elizabeth Louise Coffey Washington, D. C. 

Margaret Josephine Coffey Washington, D. C. 

Sara Frances Coggin Winston-Salem 

Mary Rose Compton Bloomfield, N. J. 

Mary Josephine Cox Birmingham, Ala. 

Nancy Lou Cross magna cum laude Hackensack, N. J, 

Leola Elizabeth Culbert Marion, Va. 

Diana Jo Cummings Robbins 

Charlene Thomas Dale cum laude High Point 

Martha Anne David Asheville 

Lois Christine Davis Rt. 4, Shelby 

Glenna DeWitt magna cum laude St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Alice Lambeth Wilson Dixon Thomasville 

Bettie Alice Dixon New Orleans, La. 

Margaret Louise Dock Balsam 

Elaine Emilie Smetana Dorton Concord 

Anne Morris Dryden Wise 

Mary Frances Elsen Washington 

Josephine Carroll Ennis Hickory 

Bettye Catherine Evans Weldon 

Nancy Josephine Everhart Thomasville 

Mildred Deloris Fain cum laude Henderson 

Alice Wray Faucette Reidsville 

Sara Frances Ferebee Ernul 

Mary Roberta Fisher Roanoke Rapids 

Jessie Louise Ford Norfolk, Va. 

Virginia Gladys Francis 1 Waynesville 

Kathryn Vaughan Friday Salisbury 

Edna Rivy Friedman Charlotte 

Hortense Bee Gatling Charlotte 

Elsie Lucille Gay Black Creek 

Clara Evelyn Gilbert Star Rt., Siler City 

Marco Elizabeth Goss Richmond, Va. 

Bernice Edith Greenberg New York City 

Minnie Rachel Hackney Rt. 3, Siler City 

Anne Hamilton Hall Charlotte 

Mary Rose Hall Rt. 1, Kannapolis 

Dorothy Frances Hallenbeck Charlotte 

Eddie Jean Harris Durham 

Varina Jean Harrison Wilson 

Rosemary Sweeney Hayden Wilmington 

1 Absent 



Degrees Conferred 229 

Patria Ilene Hege Lexington 

Sara Agnes Henneberger Troy 

Billie Josephine Mundy Hill magna cum laude Morganton 

Margaret McClure Holland Raleigh 

Catherine Ann Holm Cassadaga, Fla. 

Edith Marge Hoyle Forest City 

Peggy Lee Hull Charlotte 

Norma Richardson Hunley Rocky Mount 

Martha Evann Hurlocker Rt. 3, Albemarle 

Jacqueline Dolores Johnson Jackson Greensboro 

Grace Pearson Jahn Rt. 6, Morganton 

Ann Theresa Johnson Asheville 

Joyce Prynne Johnson Rt. 1, Smithfield 

Mary Susanna Johnson Burgaw 

Joann Jordan Johnston Mooresville 

Gean Claire Jones Whiteville 

Barbara Jordan West Hartford, Conn. 

Susan Berkeley Kimbrough Richmond, Va. 

Catherine Carole Myrick Kimsey Fayetteville 

Elizabeth Caroline Kinard Randallstown, Md. 

Kathryn Eleanor Kjrschner York, Pa. 

Elizabeth Joan Wrenn Knaup 1 Greensboro 

Mary Rebecca Lamy Jacksonville 

Rebecca Jane Langdon Benson 

Evelyn Gorham Lawrence cum laude Falkland 

Wanna Faye Laws Thomasville 

Janet Anne Linker Rt. 1, Raleigh 

Mary Helen Linville cum laude Oak Ridge 

Rosa Parsons Little Wadesboro 

Alma Lorraine Loftness Irvington, N. J. 

Martha Elaine Lohr Lumberton 

Mary Moore Lovett Asheboro 

Carol Dean Lowery Lowell 

Naomi Hanna McCluskey 1 Greensboro 

Mary David McCullen Clinton 

Mary Elizabeth McInnis Pleasant Garden 

Martha Jane McJunkins Badin 

Margaret Perry Lee McKinney High Point 

Betty Jean McKnight Morganton 

Betty Will McReynolds Winston-Salem 

Nan McArn Malloy Laurinburg 

Sara Lou Masengill Johnson City, Tenn. 

Barbara Fairfbsld Maughan 1 Durham 

Nancy Carolyn Medford Clyde 

Doris Josephine Miller Spencer 

Betty Frances Miller Winston-Salem 

1 Absent 



230 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Katharine Sanderson Miller cum laude Asheville 

Patty Joyner Mills Winston-Salem 

Gloria Anne Monk Winston-Salem 

May Louise Mooney cum laude Aiken, S. C. 

Eva Kate Moore Rt. 2, Hurdle Mills 

Dollie Gloria Moser High Point 

Dorothy Janice Murchison Rocky Mount 

Mildred Elizabeth Newitt Charlotte 

Sharon Lee Newman Greensboro 

Sara Wall Oden Washington 

Juda Christine Owen Lake Toxaway 

Lucy Stewart Page Asheville 

Kathryn Ann Parker cum laude Clinton 

Elizabeth Patricia Harrison Parker Eagle Springs 

Raedelle Hines Patterson White Plains 

Ruby Ann Payne Wilmington 

Lillian Cecilia Peaslee \ 2 Greensboro 

Ethel Florence Pendleton Wilmington 

Nellie Grey Peterson Rt. 2, Clinton 

Joan Patton Pharr Charlotte 

Mary Joanna Phillips Rockingham 

Mildred Irene Phillips Hickory 

Ann Carter Pollard Winston-Salem 

Imogene Anita Pons Rt. l, Valdese 

Mary Elizabeth Poplin magna cum laude Atlanta, Ga. 

Ramona Powell R. F. D., Enfield 

Edna Anne Preston magna cum laude Rt. 4, Fayetteville 

Ina Mae Price Spindale 

Virginia Lucile Stowe Ragland Rt. 2, Kernersville 

Rodgeryn Ann Rau Winston-Salem 

Ruth Vtoginia Rawlins cum laude Greensboro 

Antoinette Maria Reavis Henderson 

Frances Mildred Rhinehart Clyde 

Betsy Ann Richardson Elkin 

Virginia Ellen Rickert Rt. 5, Statesville 

Joan Roberts Rt. 1, Leaksville 

Anne Cly Russell Winston-Salem 

Susan Rivers Sanderson Washington 

Rachel Jeanette Sarbaugh cum laude Lumberton 

Jane Ruth Sarsfield Charlotte 

Jean Doris Satterthwaite Rt. 2, Halifax 

June Dolores Saunders Draper 

Dorothy Ann Scott Washington 

Olive Ruth Sedgwick Elizazeth City 

Frances Lee Gathright Shaw 1 Greensboro 



1 Absent 

2 Dated July 20, 1951 



Degrees Conferred 231 

Norma Jean Sherrer Asheville 

Joyce Sherill Hickory 

Dorothy Emmie Shiver Charlotte 

Patricia Anderson Sholar Greensboro 

Hazel Eugenia Dale Shores Hickory 

Ellen Brent Shuford 1 Hickory 

Elizabeth Rankin Siler Asheville 

Carolyn Atkinson Simpson Fayetteville 

Frances Elizabeth Small Rt. 2, Tabor City 

Sally Anne Smith Walnut Cove 

Linda Ann Snead Charlotte 

Mary Nancy Sorrentino Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Jean Mary Stamey Perry Point, Md. 

Hazel Virginia Steele Greensboro 

Jeanne Tarry Straiton Charlotte 

Margaret Elizabeth Sutton Pageland, S. C. 

Anne Taylor Elon College 

Shirley Jeannette Tegg cum laude Norfolk, Va. 

Mahala Geraldine Thomas Rt. 1, Culberson 

Nancy Anne Thomas Cameron 

Mary Agnes Tola Fayetteville 

Elizabeth Simmons Lynch Tolleson Kings Mountain 

Marilyn Janice Tolochko Kinston 

Mary Evelyn Trott Lenoir 

Mary Alice Turner magna cum laude Rt. 2, Henderson 

Adeline Sibly Tyson cum laude Rt. 5, Monroe 

Ann Naree Tyson Roseboro 

Ruth Annabel Underwood Greensboro 

Betty Lou Van Hook Henderson 

Patsy Anne Wagoner Greensboro 

Freda Elizabeth Ward magna cum laude Rt. 7, Salisbury 

Joan Patricia Warren Winston-Salem 

Regena Lee Waterman Tampa, Fla. 

Colista Bartlette Weisner cum laude Olin 

Ella Lee Wells Wallace 

Charlotte Frances Wells Hampstead 

Joy Benton Welsh 1 , 2 Monroe 

Joan Avis White York. Pa. 

Sara Margaret White Cornelius 

Miriam Ann Whitley cum laude Albemarle 

Anne Pendleton Whittington Charlotte 

Maria Catherine Williams Winston-Salem 

Elizabeth Joan Williams Rt. 2, Mill Spring 

Joscelyn Barnitz Williams Asheville 

Louise Mae Williamson Rocky Mount 



Absent 

2 Dated July 20, 1951 



232 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Marie Yvonne Willoughby Ahoskie 

Helen Elizabeth Wilson Franklin 

Elizabeth Bryan Winfield Washington 

Nancy Gray Winslow Robersonville 

Nancy Sue Witherspoon cum laude Lexington 

Martha Almetrice Wood Wilson's Mills 

Fay Irene Morgan Worsham Pinehurst 

Betty Jean Troutman Young 1 Charlotte 

Iris Marie Young Clarksville, Va. 

Jean Amanda Young Princeton 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Josephine Alexander Stony Point 

Mary Ann Barlow Hickory 

Carolyn Ann Biggerstaff Shelby 

Evelyn Webb Boone Rt. 4, Louisburg 

Sue Annette Boykin Wilson 

Eleanor Joyce Casey Burgaw 

Eleanor Evangeline Tucker Crutchfield Rt. 1, Guilford 

Jessie Ruth Dillard Glendale Springs 

Betty Myrl Duncan Rt. 3, Siler City 

Annette Cole Dunham Rt. 1, Elizabethtown 

Marion Talitha Skinner Erath 1 Lumberton 

Nannie Lorrena Gibson Rt. 1, IMebane 

Lillian Ann Gravely Brevard 

Cora Lillian Green Hamptonville 

Sara Emma Myers Griffin Hoffman 

Nancy Lucille Hampton Rt. 2, Kings Mountain 

Margaret Ann Harrelson Rt. 2, Kings Mountain 

Katharine Lou Harrington Rt. 2, Sanford 

Lydia Jane Moore Holloman Rt. 4, Ahoskie 

Susan Elizabeth Hooks Fremont 

Nancy Clair Howell Candler 

Catherine Eleanor Hudson cum laude Jacksonville 

Dixie Rae Farthing Huff 1 , 2 Valle Crucis 

Frances McLeod Hunt Pleasant Garden 

Jacqueline Jernigan Raleigh 

Miralyn Lucille Johnson Ashley Heights 

Peggy Adams Johnston Greensboro 

Lillian Griggs Joyner Grifton 

Nancy Catherine Keck Rt. 4, Burlington 

Betty Jane Taylor King Mt. Airy 

Dorothy Blanche Lawrence Eure 

Eleanor Frances Leatherwood Rt. 3, Waynesville 



1 A V)Q6Ti t 

2 Dated July 20, 1951 



Degrees Conferred 233 

Alice Elaine Ledbetter Rt. 3, Shelby 

Marilyn Ruth Fisher Lentz Greensboro 

Mary Ola Lilley Rt. 1, Williamston 

Mary Cunningham Scarborough Llewellyn 1 Thomasville 

Mary Elizabeth Lynch Catawba 

Anne Elizabeth McGoogan St. Pauls 

Caroline Adams McLean Mebane 

Elizabeth Setzer McLeod Rowland 

Martha Borden May Burlington 

Joyce Blue Morton Raleigh 

Caroline Winnona Ogilvie N. Wilkesboro 

Virginia Elizabeth Oliver Carthage 

Betty Jo Petrea magna cum laude Kannapolis 

Margaret Elizabeth Petrea Rt. 6, Salisbury 

Peggy Sue Pickle Rt. 4, Lexington 

Lucille Ann Pillatt Savannah, Ga. 

Jeanne Annette Pinner Tabor City 

Bobbie Lee Potts Rt. 1, Clemmons 

Nancy Rae Rothrock Thomasville 

Everette Claire Sanderford Cary 

Betty Jane Sherron Rt. 2, Fuquay Springs 

Carolyn Durham Smith Andrews 

Elsie Anne Sutton Rt. 3, La Grange 

Mary Anne Thompson 1 Saluda 

Ruth Knight Tillman cum laude Rt. 3, Carthage 

Sarah Parker Turner Mt. Ulla 

Frances Campbell Van Ness Wilmington, Delaware 

Dorothy Venable Walton Rt. 2, Rockingham 

Mary Ann Ward Goldsboro 

Mary Jean Whisonant Belmont 

Nancy Ruth Williams Wilkesboro 

Mary Jo Willis Rt. 1, Lawndale 

Elizabeth Caldwell Wilson Charlotte 

Nancy Edith Winningham 1 , 2 Charlotte 

Sara Bridgers Wyche Rt. 3, Henderson 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Ethel Dae Ball Rt. 1, Swannanoa 

Mattie Camilla Barringer Albemarle 

Elizabeth Ann Bell Charlotte 

Elizabeth Mildred Cresenzo Rt. 3, Reidsville 

Grace Alexandra Farrior Burgaw 

Peggy Anne Feimster Olin 

Frances Emma Fowler Mt. Airy 



1 Absent 

2 Dated July 20, 1951 



234 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Barbara Anne Hall South Boston, Va. 

Lucille Lavern Hannah Rt. 1, Franklin 

Betty Grey Harrington Wadesboro 

Dorothy Gattis Hogan Rt. 2, Chapel Hill 

Virginia Rae Ingram Taylorsville 

Mary- Virginia Lewis Nutley, N. J. 

Nancy Lee Maples Rocky Mount 

Peggy June Phillips Southern Pines 

Carolyn Joyce Powell Charlotte 

Sarah Ann Shuford Arden 

Janie Belle Smith Pikeville 

Pricilla Anne Snider Springfield, Mass. 

Jean Weaver Stevens Winston-Salem 

Bobbie Mae Strickland Smithfield 

Virginia Mae Van Dyke cum laude Tazewell, Va. 

Edna Earle Wolfe Mt. Olive 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Diana Elizabeth Addison Durham 

Jimmie Kathryn Biggerstaff Marion 

Virginia Elinor Brown Weaverville 

Ethel Geralyn Harman Burch Greensboro 

Betty Zane Causey Randleman 

Frances Anne Clegg Carthage 

Charlotte Isabelle Sedberry Cole Leaksville 

Betty Jean Conley Rt. 3, Marion 

Virginia Trenmore Conner Charlotte 

Constance Grace Coutras Charlotte 

Bertha Graham Crockett Wytheville, Va. 

Alma Gray Davis Pikeville 

Miriam Grace Davis Rocky Mount 

Mary Lucinda Driver Raleigh 

Shirley Mae Ehret Raleigh 

Janet Fitzgerald Everitt Selma 

Betty Jean French Greensboro 

Katherine Louise Furr Franklin 

Betsy Rose Gehman Rocky Mount 

Shirley Alice Hack Nutley, N. J. 

Doris Siler Hancock Siler City 

Mary Lou Hanson Southport 

Margie Ann Harding Pilot Mountain 

Eleanor Haroutunian Teheran, Iran 

Cornelia Elizabeth Green Hauser Thomasville 

Tommie Lee Haywood Charlotte 

Dolly Ann Hedgecock Rt. 1, High Point 

Anne Henderson Monroe 



Degrees Conferred 235 

Mae Elaine Holly Davidson 

Beverly Jean Pinchback Holt Greensboro 

Eleanor Graham Hoskins Summerfield 

Betty Anne Hufham Clinton 

Henrietta Dawson Jackson Robbins 

Martha Ann Medlin Jobe Rt. 6, Greensboro 

Betty Wilson Johnson Benson 

Dorothy Jean Winters Jones Winston- Salem 

Mary Elizabeth Kent Rt. 6, Lenoir 

Marie Johnston King Rt. 1, Pelham 

Martha Cordelia Lippard Rt. 3, Albemarle 

Lois Lillian Loftis Walnut Cove 

Eugenia McCarty Atlanta, Ga. 

Nina Marie McLeod Robbins 

Mamie Faye Marshall Winston-Salem 

Emily Alice Micol Valdese 

Carolyn Lurlene Moon Graham 

Jessie Gray Nichols Efland 

Mary Lena Patterson Rt. 4, Morganton 

Clara Louise Pickard Randleman 

Lila June Rainey Salisbury 

Lora Jean Reeves Walnut 

Jean Carol Rogers Albemarle 

Mary Elizabeth Ross Pleasant Garden 

Lillian Marie Sawyer Rt. 3, Elizabeth City 

Olive Ann Shaw Rt. 2, Richlands 

Nancy Ann Sides Spencer 

Millicent Diane Simon Tabor City 

Mary Frances Smith Roaring Gap 

Lillian Belle Smith Lake Waccamaw 

Shirley Mae Smith Kernersville 

Evelyn Jane Spencer Rocky Mount 

Martitia Jane Troy Wilmington 

Ellen Joann Wicker Lumberton 

Emily Ann Williams Siler City 

BACHELORS OF FINE ARTS 

Marian Elizabeth Adams 1 Rt. 1, Winston-Salem 

Janet Marilyn Batts Waynesboro, Va. 

Carolyn Gilbert Burton Rt. 2, Greensboro 

Laura Jane Cabaniss Rt. 5, Shelby 

Margaret Ann Click Elkin 

Patricia Jane Hockett Greensboro 

Barbara Ann Jobe Raleigh 

Absent 



236 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

Juanita Louise Madison Webster 

Hilda Hancock Marston Scotland Neck 

Martha Elizabeth Maynard Winston-Salem 

Edna Eugenia Okey Graham 

Pauline Linwood White Greensboro 

BACHELORS OF MUSIC 

Helen Joyce Day Garner 

Mary Ellenor Eubanks Hassell 

Rose Ellen Fincher Rt. 3, Concord 

Barbara Anne Harris Salisbury 

Patricia Anne Harris Jacksonville, Fla. 

Joyce Isabelle Howe Springfield, Mass. 

Doris Celeste Huffines Lenoir 

Sarah Louise McGoogan St. Pauls 

Elsie Carolyn Neece Elizabeth City 

Nancy Page Smith Greensboro 

Betty Eubanks Randall Younts Greensboro 

MASTERS OF ARTS IN EDUCATION 

Jane Florence Bird 1 Brooksville, Fla, 

Mary Catherine Grantham Bostian High Point 

Nellie Pauline Kennedy 1 Brooksville, Fla. 

MASTERS OF EDUCATION 

Rebecca Pruitt Allen Mount Airy 

John Franklin Barrier 1 Farmer 

James Robert Blackwell, Jr Kernersville 

Dorothea Marie Breding Rehoboth Beach, Del. 

Holland Lee Brinkley Thomasville 

Lois Leonard Brinkley Welcome 

Kathryn Tolleson Brown Elkin 

Thomas Carl Brown 1 Raleigh 

Ishmael Worth Bunn Rural Hall 

Mary Major Burris Anderson, S. C. 

Thomas Dalton Cash Winston-Salem 

Nina DeBruhl Clark Asheville 

Evelyn Faye Coley High Point 

Ruby Hudson Cox Mars Hill 

Margaret Daniel Greensboro 

Barbara Lee Drinkwater Greensboro 

Marie Eller Purlear 

Mary Morris Ellis Leaksville 

Absent 



Degrees Conferred 237 

Sara Hunt Ferguson Leaksville 

John Milton Fletcher Winston-Salem 

George Allen Fulk Pilot Mountain 

Edna Bond Gibson Dermott, Ark. 

Everette Thomas Gibson 1 Winston-Salem 

Julian Gibson 1 Winston-Salem 

Raleigh Jack Gibson Sandy Ridge 

Leonard Lee Greene High Point 

Grace Valentine Grogan Stoneville 

Beulah Hodges Haizlip Leaksville 

Anne Saunders Harris Reidsville 

Ina Leonard Hartman Winston-Salem 

Rosa Mae Ingram High Point 

Helene Elise Jacobs Raleigh 

Ernest Nicholas Jenkins, Sr Guilford College 

Kenneth Leon Johnson Reidsville 

Leslie Eugene Johnston Winston-Salem 

Jean Morton Joyce Winston-Salem 

Reagon Leon Kuykendall Winston-Salem 

Margaret Elizabeth Lane Aulander 

William Raymond Lemmons Thomasville 

Theodore Pleasant Leonard Lexington 

Bert Eldon Lyons Winston-Salem 

Minnie May Maness Bear Creek 

Troy Alfred Matthews East Bend 

William Francis Morgan Winston-Salem 

Martha Pringle Morris Lawsonville 

Emma Orr Nelson Greensboro 

James Leak Nelson Winston-Salem 

Louise Williams Newman Winston-Salem 

Maude Mae Newton Burlington 

Lawrence Earl Paige 1 Thomasville 

Julius Caesar Phillips Steeds 

Mary Edward Pitts Greensboro 

Linda Rankin Greensboro 

Margaret Elder Ratterree Kings Mountain 

Nannds Dee Reitzel Elon College 

Bartley Ernest Robbins Thomasville 

Robert Vance Robertson Concord 

Grace Taylor Rodenbough Walnut Cove 

Mark Spurgeon Rose Winston-Salem 

William Stewart Scott Spray 

Evelyn Blackwell Staley Staley 

David Ferdinand Still well Winston-Salem 

Lucille Cox Stone * Reidsville 

1 Absent 



238 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Danny Wayne Taylor Reidsville 

Eulalia Coltrane Thacker Greensboro 

Annabel Thompson Greensboro 

Ethel Boles Voss Winston-Salem 

Violet Mozelle Caneega Webb East Hampton, N. Y. 

Reba New Wilson 1 Davidson 

Joseph Harding Wishon , Lewisville 

MASTERS OF SCIENCE 

Dorothy McCulloch Alexander Pleasant Garden 

Ruth Cordle 1 Durham 

Mary Edith Councilman Bear Creek 

Gladys Ruth Parker Fountain 

Jessie Anna Potts Highlands 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Mary Angelyn Giles 1 Roanoke, Va. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Louise Patrick Edwards 1 Darlington, S. C. 

MASTERS OF FINE ARTS 

Arnold Hugh Altvater Greensboro 

William Otto Bevilaqua 1 Richmond, Va. 

Wilma Lillian King Greensboro 

Andrew Wesley Morgan 1 New York 

Mildred Naomi Olson 1 Harvey, 111. 

Raiford Miller Porter Winston-Salem 

HONORARY DEGREE 

Gertrude Weil, Doctor of Humane Letters 

PHI BETA KAPPA 
Elections from the Class of 1952 



Patsy Lee Allen 
Anita Ilese Bolinger 
Rosemary Clifford Boney 
Virginia Anne Bradford 
Nancy Lou Cross 
Charlene Thomas Dale 



Glenna DeWitt 
Mildred Deloris Fain 
Billie Josephine Mundy Hill 
Evelyn Gorham Lawrence 
Mary Helen Linville 
Katharine Sanderson Miller 



1 Absent 



Degrees Conferred 239 

May Louise Mooney Mary Alice Turner 

Kathryn Ann Parker Adeline Sibly Tyson 

Mary Elizabeth Poplin Freda Elizabeth Ward 

Edna Anne Preston Colista Bartlette Weisner 

Ruth VntGiNiA Rawlins Miriam Ann Whitley 

Rachel Jeanette Sarbaugh Nancy Sue Witherspoon 
Shirley Jeannette Tegg 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Class of 1952 

Mary Elizabeth Poplin Honors in English 

Freda Elizabeth Ward Honors in English 

Glenna DeWitt Honors in History 

Ruth Virginia Rawlins Honors in History 

AWARDS 

Henry Weil Fellowship Glenna DeWitt, class '52 

Borden Home Economics Scholarship, Laura Lucinda Morgan, class '53 
Consoldated University Graduate Fellowship . . Joan Williams, class '52 

Mina Weil Memorial Scholarship Ann Carol Maney, class '53 

Faculty Science Club Scholarship Bessie Freeman, class '53 

Mrs. Charles D. Mclver Memorial Award, Sarah Lynn Bailey, class '53 

Winfield Scholarship Sallie Beaver, class '53 

Mendenhall Scholarship Sue Shugart, class '53 

Myrtle Spaugh Reeves Scholarship Jean Hollinger, class '53 

Phi Beta Kappa Award Patsy Haywood, class '53 

Anna Howard Shaw Award Glenna Byrd, class '52 



240 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY, 1952-1953 

Senior Class 437 

Junior Class 458 

Sophomore Class 502 

Freshman Class 643 

Commercial Students 226 

Graduate Students 51 

Special Students 87 

Total Regular Session 2404 

Summer Session, 1952 1030 



Total Number Enrolled 3434 

Number Counted Twice 235 



3199 



Curry School Enrollment 392 

Curry School, SS 1952 55 

Kindergarten and Nursery School 34 481 

Total Enrollment, 1952-1953 3680 






X. STUDENT LIST 

SENIOR CLASS 

Abernathy, Ann Marie, B.S.P.E Chapel Hill 

Adams, Judith, A.B Goldsboro 

Anderson, Lois, A.B McLeansville 

Anderson, Margaret, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Andrews, Jean, B.S.P.E Durham 

Andrews, Sue Page, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Anthony, Harriette, A.B Shelby 

Armstrong, Frances, A.B Belmont 

Armstrong, Isabel, A.B Greensboro 

Arrowood, Mary, B.S.P.E Linden 

Atwood, Gelene Andrews, A.B Sparta 

Bailey, Sara Lynn, A.B Charlotte 

Baker, Marie Richardson, B.S.S.A Reidsville 

Barbour, Virginia, A.B Fayetteville 

Barnes, Betty, A.B Boone 

Barnette, Yarboro, A.B Charlotte 

Barnhill, Anna, B.S.H.E Wilson 

Batten, Susan, A.B Kinston 

Batty, Mary Alice, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Baucom, Elizabeth Ann, B.M Wadesboro 

Baysdon, Betty Cobb, A.B Greensboro 

Beaver, Sally, A.B Albemarle 

Beck, Rebecca Fondren, A.B Greensboro 

Bell, Sheila, A.B Greensboro 

Bennett, Ann, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Best, Joan Phillips, A.B Greensboro 

Beverly, Louise, B.S.S.A Bethel 

Blackwell, Ann, A.B Ruffin 

Blalock, Ann Cohoon, A.B Columbia 

Blount, Carolyn Miller, B.S.P.E Salisbury 

Blumberg, Joan, A.B Fairlawn, N. J. 

Bodenheimer, Kathleen, B.S.H.E Kernersville 

Boerner, Trilby, A.B Winston- Salem 

Bolton, Jean Fogleman, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Bonner, Ethel, A.B Raleigh 

Bowen, Joyce, B.S.P.E. Windsor 

Bowie, Joyce, B.S.P.E Welcome, Md. 

Breeze, Mary Idol, A.B Pleasant Garden 

Brinson, Patsy, A.B New Bern 

Brookshire, Nancy Gaston, B.S.P.E Asheville 

241 



242 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Brown, Brabston, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Brown, M. Jean, A.B Black Mountain 

Brumley, Mary, A.B Gastonia 

Bryant, Beverly, A.B Charlotte 

Bryant, Julia, A.B Charlotte 

Buie, Merle, A.B Fayetteville 

Bullard, Hilda, A.B Fayetteville 

Bunn, Anne, A.B Roanoke Rapids 

Butler, Valinda, B.S.S.A Burlington 

Butts, Sara Ann, B.S.H.E Halifax 

Cagle, Marjorie, A.B Castle Hayne 

Call, Dot, A.B Advance 

Carden, Barbara, B.S.S.A Durham 

Carpenter, Mary Sue, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Carpenter, Patricia, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Carrington, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

Carroll, Elizabeth, A.B Hookerton 

Carter, Emily, A.B Siler City 

Causby, Sue, A.B Bessemer City 

Centini, Doris Davis, B.S.H.E Cornelius 

Chandler, Nelle, A.B Burlington 

Cheek, Audrey, A.B Catonsville, Md. 

Chipley, Luta, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Clark, Barbara, A.B Roanoke, Va. 

Clark, Betty Sue, B.F.A Burlington 

Clayton, Janice, B.F.A Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Clinard, Audra, A.B Winston-Salem 

Clingenpeel, Lura, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Clodfelter, Patsy, B.S.H.E High Point 

Coggins, Olivia, A.B Lexington 

Colvard, Annabel, B.S.H.E Jefferson 

Connolly, Patricia, A.B Plainfield, N. J. 

Cooper, Mildred, B.F.A Ennice 

Cornelius, Joan, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Cornwell, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Lincolnton 

Cowan, Betty Oldham, B.M Greensboro 

Cox, Claire, B.F.A Elon College 

Cox, Piney, B.S.S.A Washington 

Cragan, Jane, A.B Sanford 

Craig, Virginia, A.B Lenoir 

Crenshaw, Colleen, A.B Asheville 

Crews, Caroline, B.M Oxford 

Crews, Mary Elizabeth Johnson, A.B Greensboro 

Crossley, Joan, A.B. Winston-Salem 



Student List 243 

Crowell, Patricia, A.B Newell 

Grumpier, Margaret, B.S.H.E Towson, Md. 

Daniel, Mary Scott, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Darlington, Ann, A.B Winston-Salem 

Daughtry, Bennette, A.B Goldsboro 

Daves, Betty Jean, B.F.A Lincolnton 

Davis, Doris Arnold, A.B Siler City 

Davis, Louise, B.S.H.E Lexington 

Deas, Ann, B.S.H.E Canton 

Denny, Jean, A.B Raleigh 

DeShazo, Marshall, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Deviney, Joan, A.B Spindale 

Donnell, Patricia, A.B Goldsboro 

Downs, Mary H. Franck, A.B Fayetteville 

Dowtin, Mary, A.B Lexington 

Dudley, Mary Ann, B.M Canton 

Dyhrberg, Barbara, A.B Elizabeth City 

Early, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Edgerton, Lois Herring, A.B Wallace 

Edwards, Ann B., A.B Greensboro 

Ehle, Margaret Whisenhunt, A.B Greensboro 

Elliott, Mary Alice, A.B Oxford 

Elmore, Cenieth, B.M Franklinton 

Ervin, Billie, B.S.H.E Shelby 

Eure, Phyllis, B.S.H.E Eure 

Falls, Ann, A.B Lawndale 

Farmer, Mary, B.S.H.E Marble 

Farmer, Ruth, B.S.H.E Bailey 

Farrington, Ramona, B.S.H.E Salisbury 

Faust, Nancy, A.B Greensboro 

Fishbach, Joyce, B.M. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Forney, Clare, A.B Westport, Conn. 

Foster, Ann, B.S.P.E DeLand, Fla. 

Freeman, Bessie, A.B Hendersonville 

Freeman, Katharine, A.B Charlotte 

Fuller, Bobbie, B.M Norlina 

Fuller, Jane, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Fuller, Jo Ann, A.B Mount Holly 

Fuquay, Margaret, B.S.H.E Snow Camp 

Fyne, Janet, A.B Sumter, S. C. 

Gaither, Mary, A.B Warrenton 

Gantt, Doris, A.B Mount Holly 



244 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Garrett, Lorna, B.S.H.E Draper 

Gaston, Martha, A.B Asheville 

Gibbs, Julia, A.B Statesville 

Gilbert, Ann Collson, A.B Greensboro 

Gilliam, Jean Williams, A.B Thomasville 

Gillikin, Elizabeth Handley, B.S.P.E Goldsboro 

Gills, Lucille, B.S.H.E Bluefiled, W. Va. 

Glass, Rebecca, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Glenn, Malissa, A.B Henderson 

Glenn, Peggy, A.B Waynesboro 

Goodman, Barbara Beckner, A.B Greensboro 

Goodwin, Jo Elaine, A.B Durham 

Goudelock, Jean, A.B Monroe 

Graham, Doris, A.B Clyde 

Gravely, Ellen, A.B Washington 

Greene, Alma, A.B Parkersburg 

Greene, Kathryn S. Farthing, B.S.H.E Valle Crucis 

Greer, Margaret P., B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Gresham, Mary Jane, B.S.H.E Beulaville 

Griffin, Gwendolyn Keller, B.S.H.E High Point 

Gryder, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Guin, Catherine Sitterson, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Haden, Carolyn, A.B Asheville 

Hall, Harriet, A.B Greensboro 

Hall, Helen, B.F.A Oxford 

Hall, Peggy, A.B High Point 

Hamer, Gwendolyn, A.B Lenoir 

Hammond, Helen, A.B Charlotte 

Harman, Frances, A.B Skyland 

Harrelson, Patricia, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Harris, Ann, A.B Charlotte 

Harris, Annie Laura, A.B McLeansville 

Harris, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Mountain Park 

Harris, Faye, B.S.S.A Washington 

Harris, Martha, B.F.A Shelby 

Harris, Mary Alice, B.S.H.E Norwood 

Harrison, Anne, B.S.S.A Wilson 

Harrison, Martha, B.S.S.A Palmyra 

Hassell, Lucille, B.M Hendersonville 

Hawfield, Helen, B.S.S.A Washington, D. C. 

Haydock-Wilson, Selma, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Haywood, Patsy, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Heafner, Ann, B.M Lincolnton 

Helms, Barbara, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Helms, Lou Outen, A.B Charlotte 



Student List 245 

Helms, Margaret, A.B Charlotte 

Herring, Ruth, B.M Wilson 

Hicks, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Selma 

Hill, Betty Clyde, A.B Wilson 

Hill, Elizabeth, A.B Wilmington 

Hocker, Patricia, B.S.S.A Guilford 

Holden, Rose, A.B Shallotte 

Holland, Geraldine, B.S.S.A Salemburg 

Hollemen, Mary Ellen, A.B Jonesville 

Hollinger, Jean, B.F.A Gastonia 

Holshouser, Mary, A.B Blowing Rock 

Home, Peggy, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Howard, Jane, B.S.H.E Salemburg 

Howard, Jean Stewart, B.S.P.E Salemburg 

Howard, Jean Wandean, B.S.P.E Sanford 

Howell, Barbara, A.B. Lillington 

Howell, Helen, B.M Candler 

Howie, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Hunt, Barbara, A.B Greer, S. C. 

Hunter, Josephine, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Huss, Frances, A.B Gastonia 

Hutchins, Helen, A.B Yadkinville 

Idol, Ruth, A.B Kernersville 

Imbt, Montae, A.B Fort Worth, Tex. 

Ingold, Ophelia, A.B Taylorsville 

Ivey, Nellie, A.B Roanoke Rapids 

James, Sally, B.S.S.A Maxton 

Jantz, Cherie, A.B Bedford, Va. 

Jernigan, Peggy, B.S.S.A Selma 

Johnson, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Jolliff, Marietta, A.B Belvidere 

Jones, Sarah, B.S.P.E Franklinville 

Jones, Shirley, B.F.A Greer, S. C. 

Joseph, Dolores, A.B Wendell 

Joyner, Arlene, A.B Ayden 

Junker, Carolyn, A.B Concord 

Justice, Beverly, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Kanter, Sylvia, B.M Kinston 

Kaplan, Miriam, B.F.A Durham 

Katsikas, Georgia, A.B Greensboro 

Kearns, Dorothy Kendall, A.B Greensboro 

Kelley, Mary Joe, B.M Winston-Salem 

Kerner, Dorothy, A.B Kernersville 



246 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Kimmelstiel, Marion, A.B Charlotte 

Kornegay, Pearl, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Koster, Katherine, B.F.A Morganton 

Kyles, Ruth, B.S.H.E Taylorsville 

Kyzer, Anna Marie, A.B Hamlet 

Langley, Janet, B.F.A High Point 

Lassiter, Miriam, A.B Four Oaks 

Laughlin, Julia Ann Doggett, A.B Greensboro 

Leach, Pattie, A.B Wilson 

Leagon, Carolyn, A.B Statesville 

Lee, L. Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Lewis, Doris, B.S.S.A . . Schenectady, N.Y. 

Lewis, Lou Ann, A.B Goldsboro 

Lewis, Margaret, A.B Greensboro 

Lineberger, Geneva, B.S.H.E Gastonia 

Little, Barbara, B.S.P.E. Ayden 

Little, Elizabeth, A.B Gasfonia 

Long, Louise, B.S.H.E Leaksville 

Lowmiller, Barbara, B.S.P.E Unionville, Conn. 

Lucas, Sara, A.B Lucama 

Luffman, Winnie, B.S.H.E State Road 

McCoy, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Charlotte 

McDuffie, Pauline, B.F.A Biltmore 

McGhee, Jean, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

McGougan, Patricia, A.B Smithfield 

Mclnnis, Maxine, A.B Pinebluff 

Mclntyre, Carolyn, A.B Richmond, Va. 

Mclntyre, Katherine, A.B jMaxton 

Mclver, Lois, A.B Gulf 

McKeithan, Barbara, A.B Gastonia 

McLean, Sarah, B.F.A Winston-Salem 

McManus, Edna, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

MacPhail, Janet, A.B Arlington, N. J. 

McPherson, Jean, A.B Burlington 

McQueen, Virginia, A.B Fayetteville 

MacRae, Catherine, A.B Wilmington 

Maney, Ann Carol, A.B Tappan, N. Y. 

Markas, Patricia, A.B Morganton 

Martin, Charlotte Bryson, B.F.A Bryson City 

Martin, Joanne, A.B Elon College 

Martin, Patricia, A.B Mayodan 

Martin, Ruth, A.B Cleveland 

Martin, Susan, A.B Ft. Monroe, Va. 

Mauney, Pauline, B.M Kings Mountain 



Student List 247 

Mauney, Peggy, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain 

Mazo, Julie Packer, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Melton, Gloria Miller, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Menzel, Janet, B.S.S.A Southern Pines 

Mercer, Sammie, B.S.H.E Bolivia 

Miller, Carol, B.S.P.E Mocksville 

Mills, Carolyn, A.B Monroe 

Mitchell, Margie Ann, A.B Greensboro 

Mitchell, Mary, B.S.P.E Denton 

Mitchell, Sue Haley, A.B. Elon College 

Montague, Mary, A.B Clayton 

Moody, Lydia, A.B Siler City 

Mooney, Elizabeth, A.B Aiken, S. C. 

Moore, Margaret T., A.B Miami, Fla. 

Moose, Marie, A.B Reidsville 

Morgan, Jean Lohr, A.B Lexington 

Morgan, Laura, B.S.H.E , Hamlet 

Morgan, Peggy, B.S.S.A Spindale 

Mormino, Anna, A.B Waynesville 

Morris, Sue Brevard, A.B Shelby 

Morrison, Anne, A. B Spencer 

Morrison, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Rowland 

Muller, Marlene, A.B Winston-Salem 

Murray, Jean, B.S.S.A High Point 

Myers, Martha, B.S.S.A Thomasville 

Neal, Anne, B.S Swarthmore, Pa. 

Neighbours, Peggy, B.S.S.A Hillsboro 

Nelson, Lois, A.B Aulander 

Nesbitt, Martha, A.B Edneyville 

Newton, Sarah, A.B Raleigh 

Nichols, Malinda, A.B Durham 

Norman, Wynne, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

O'Brien, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Pembroke 

Oliver, Billie, B.S.H.E Jefferson 

Oliver, Kathryn, B.M Fairmont 

Otterbourg, Edna, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Outlaw, Isabel, A.B Albemarle 

Owen, Patricia, A.B Thomasville 

Painter, Barbara Ledford, B.S.H.E Wendell 

Palmer, Arline, A.B Winston-Salem 

Parker, Barbara, B.S.S.A Kelford 

Pasour, Patricia, B.S.S.A Dallas 

Peck, Mary Anna, B.S.S.A Shelby 



248 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Peg-ram, Betty Jean, A.B High Point 

Pepper, Anne, A.B Hamlet 

Peters, Lois, A.B Lindenhurst, N. Y. 

Petree, Leah, A.B Charlotte 

Phillips, Elizabeth, A.B Raleigh 

Phillips, Eugenia Jarvis, A.B Greensboro 

Pierce, Doris, A.B Greensboro 

Plyer, Jane, B.S.H.E Gold Hill 

Potter, Nancy, A.B Winston-Salem 

Potts, Jean, B.S.P.E Longmeadow, Mass. 

Preble, Carolyn, B.S.P.E Manchester, Conn. 

Presnell, Imojean, A.B Siler City 

Prince, Patricia, A.B Fuquay Springs 

Pritchett, Kathryn, B.S.H.E Brown Summit 

Pruitt, Virginia, B.S.S.A Mount Airy 

Raines, Jean, B.S.H.E Cary 

Randall, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Brevard 

Rawley, Edith, A.B Winston-Salem 

Ray, Roberta, B.S.S.A Selma 

Reavis, Margaret, A.B Yadkinville 

Redwine, Jane, A.B Albemarle 

Rhyne, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Dallas 

Roberts, Rachel, A.B Shelby 

Robertson, Josephone, B.S.H.E Montreal, Canada 

Robin, Barbara, A. B Winston-Salem 

Robinette, Marilyn, A.B High Point 

Rollins, Jean, A.B Newton 

Rosecrans, Lois, A.B Greensboro 

Rosen, Joan, A.B Charlotte 

Royall, Rozelle, A.B Clinton 

Sampson, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Sevier, Ruth, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Sexton, Laura, B.M Zebulon 

Shain, Harriet, A.B Wilmington 

Sheffield, Barbara, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Shields, Kathryn, A.B Kernersville 

Shotwell, Peggy, A.B Henderson 

Shugart, Sue, A.B Elkin 

Sifford, Marion, A.B Albemarle 

Simpson, Nancy, A.B Charlotte 

Simpson, Rebekah Welborn, A.B Greensboro 

Sizer, Mary, B.S.S.A Sigh Point 

Skees, Jeanne, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Skidmore, Mary Frances, B.S.S.A Albemarle 



Student List 249 

Smith, Barbara Griggs, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Smith, Doris, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Smith, Gloria, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Smith, Juanita, A.B Lexington 

Smith, Norma, A.B Greensboro 

Snider, Dorothy S., A.B Uniontown, Pa. 

Solomon, Catherine, A.B Wilmington 

Sparks, Annette Parker, A.B Clinton 

Spector, Zita, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Stacy, Barbara, A.B Ruffin 

Starr, Ruth, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Stephens, Edna, A.B Liberty 

Stephens, Jean, A.B Yanceyville 

Stern, Janet, B.S.P.E South Orange, N. J. 

Stockard, Carol, A.B Graham 

Stokes, Juanita, B.M Greenville 

Strelitz, Jane, A.B Lexington 

Strickland, Annette, A.B Wade 

Stroud, Anne, A.B Faison 

Styers, Betty, A.B Morganton 

Suitt, Billie Marie, A.B Hillsboro 

Sutton, Paula, B.S.H.E Clinton 

Swann, Alice, B.S.H.E Statesville 

Swanson, Katherine, B.S.H.E Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Sykes, Jean, B.S.H.E Whitakers 

Sykes, Jeanette, B.M Whitakers 

Sylvester, Fay, B.S.S.A. Richlands 

Talton, Lady, A.B Zebulon 

Tandy, Jean, A.B Fletcher 

Tarlton, Patricia Matlock, B.S.H.E Taylorsville 

Tate, Sue, B.S.S.A Danville, Va. 

Tatum, Pauline, B.S.H.E Elizabethtown 

Taylor, Barbara May, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Taylor, Ruby, B.S.S.A Kinston 

Teague, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Chapel Hill 

Thacker, Jean, A.B Greensboro 

Thomas, Lorene, B.S.H.E Enfield 

Thomas, Marilyn, B.S.H.E Oakboro 

Thompson, Betty Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Thompson, M. Frances, B.M Salisbury 

Thompson, Jane, A.B Graham 

Tilley, Bertha, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Townsend, Bettie, A.B Fayetteville 

Trembath, Janet, A.B , Laurel Hill 

Tribble, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Charlotte 



250 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Truett, Carolyn, A.B Bryson City 

Turner, Ann, A.B Henderson 

Uden, Shirley, B.S.S.A Leaksville 

Underwood, Sally, A.B Boonville 

Upchurch, Lee, A.B Four Oaks 

Vander Schalie, Margie, A.B Castle Hayne 

Veach, Barbara, A.B Mayodan 

Vida, Beatrice, A.B Hendersonville 

Waddell, Nellie, B.S.H.E Ennice 

Wade, Harriett, A.B Roxboro 

Ward, Anne, A.B Danville, Va. 

Warren, Cora Lee, B.S.S.A Conetoe 

Watkins, Dale, B.S.H.E Weaverville 

Weatherly, Mary Anne, A. B Durham 

Weber, Eleanor, B.M Salisbury 

Weinert, Marion, A. B Northbridge, Mass. 

Welborn, Norma, A.B Greensboro 

Wheeler, Ruth, B.S.S.A Durham 

Whelpley, Joan, B.S.P.E Baltimore, Md. 

White, Emma Lou, A.B Oxford 

White, Mildred, A.B Winston-Salem 

White, Virginia, A.B Wiston-Salem 

Whitmore, Harriett, A.B Charlotte 

Wilkinson, Mary F., A.B Nelson, Va. 

Williams, Dorothy B.S.S.A Wilson 

Williams, Jo Ann, A.B Mount Holly 

Wilson, Mary Louise, A.B Winston-Salem 

Wimbish, Helen, A. B Graham 

Windley, Katherine, B.S.H.E Henderson 

Winslow, Lelia, A.B Hertford 

Winterling, Miriam, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Wiseman, Sylvia, A.B Salisbury 

Woodall, Ann, A.B Smithfield 

Woodward, Mary, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Woody, Dorothy, A.B Sanford 

Wray, Dorothy, A.B Spindale 

Wray, Jean, A.B Shelby 

Wrenn, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Ruffin 

Wright, LaRue Johnson, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Wright, Sarah, B.S.H.E Guilford College 

Yarbrough, Mae, B.S.H.E Reidsville 

Yelverton, Nancy, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount 

Young, Alice, B.F.A Raleigh 



Student List 251 

Young, Diane, B.S.S.A Reidsville 

Young, Evelyn Kirby, A.B Greensboro 

Young, Joyce L., B.F.A Durham 

Zimmerman, Jo Ann, A.B Greensboro 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Abernethy, Mary Ann, B.M Hickory 

Adams, Anabel, A.B Asheville 

Adams, Susan, A.B McKeesport, Pa. 

Ahern, Mary Louise, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Alexander, Margaret, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Allen, Faye, A.B Snow Camp 

Almond, Libby Ruth, B.M New London 

Almond, Sarah, B.S.S.A Asheboro 

Alspaugh, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Winston-Salem 

Alspaugh, Monta Sue, B.S.H.E South Charleston, W. Va. 

Arnold, Yvonne, A.B Beaufort 

Atkins, Ruth, B.S.S.A Clinton 

Auskern, Miriam, B.S.P.E Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ayers, Jean, B.F.A Greensboro 

Baker, Jacquetta, B.S.H.E Oxford 

Ballinger, Nancy, A.B Guilford College 

Barbee, Susanna, B.M Enfield 

Barber, Anne, B.F.A Richlands 

Barber, Betsey, A.B Mount Ulla 

Barker, Tommye, A.B Salisbury 

Barnes, Peggy, A.B Lucama 

Barnhardt, Anne, A.B Delco 

Barrett, Dorothy, A.B Burlington 

Barringer, Marijennie, A. B Hickory 

Barrow, Nancy, B.S.H.E Oak Ridge 

Bass, Gertrude, B.S.H.E Fayetteville 

Bateman, Joyce, B.S.S.A Columbia 

Beamer, Nancy, A.B Mount Airy 

Beauford, Jewel, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Beck, Melba, A.B Winston-Salem 

Bell, Sue, A.B Asheville 

Benedict, Thirza, B.S.H.E Kingsport, Tenn. 

Benfield, Margaret, B.S.S.A Valdese 

Bennett, Mary Ann, B.S.S.A Hamlet 

Benson, Nancy, A.B Greensboro 

Berg, Diane, A.B Nutley, N.J. 



252 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Bernstein, Rosa, A.B Spring Lake 

Best, Peggy, A.B Kinston 

Betts, Doris Waugh, A.B Statesville 

Bevan, Ann, A.B Burlington 

Bill, Margaret, A.B Hendersonville 

Birgel, Carolyn, A.B Greensboro 

Birkby, Phyllis, A.B Nutley, N. J. 

Black, Ida Maude, B.S.H.E Sparta 

Black, Jo Ann, B.S.P.E Roanoke Rapids 

Blackburn, Jean, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Blackmon, Little, A.B Lancaster, S.C. 

Blackmore, Grace, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Blackwelder, Sara, A.B Concord 

Blake, Jane, A.B Chadbourn 

Blalock, Patricia, A.B Kinston 

Blaylock, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Bluett, Dorothy, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Boesser, Patricia, A.B Winston-Salem 

Boren, Ada, A.B Siler City 

Borow, Anne, A.B Plainfleld, N. J. 

Bowden, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Teachey 

Bowden, Florence, A.B Goldsboro 

Bowden, Lenna, A.B Summerfleld 

Bowen, Catherine, A.B Hampstead 

Bowen, Emily, B.F.A Washington 

Boyce, Glendora, B.S.P.E Ansonville 

Bradley, Lou, A.B Summerfleld 

Bragg, Barbara, A.B Wilmington 

Bramlett, Norma, A.B Canton 

Brannon, Marilyn, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Brewer, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Jamesville 

Bright, Miriam, B.S.P.E Virginia Beach, Va. 

Bristol, Betty Greenwood, A.B Andrews 

Britt, Mary Ann, B.S.S.A High Point 

Britt, Peggy, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Brooks, Doris, A.B Kannapolis 

Brown, Frances, B.S.H.E Mooresville 

Brown, Katherine, A.B Winston-Salem 

Brown, Lois, A.B Salisbury 

Brown, Ruth, A.B Zebulon 

Brown, Sumaleigh, B.S.H.E Burgaw 

Browne, Betsy, B.S.P.E Morganton 

Bunton, Peggy, A.B Union Grove 

Burch, Margaret C, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Burnie, Anne, A.B Wilmington 



Student List 253 

Butner, Emily, A.B Winston-Salem 

Byrd, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Worthville 

Carpenter, Sarah, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Carr, Shirley Henkel, B.S.H.E Statesville 

Carroll, Linda, B.F.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Case, Mary, B.M Winston-Salem 

Casper, Billie Jean, B.S.H.E Swansboro 

Castanas, Becky, B.F.A Charlotte 

Cates, Merle, A.B Greensboro 

Cates, Winifred, A.B Ramseur 

Cheek, Lucy, A.B Greensboro 

Church, Jean, A.B Wilmington 

Claridge, Dail, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Clark, Alice, B.S.H.E Enfield 

Clark, Freda, A.B Asheville 

Clinard, Helen, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Cole, Jean, B.S.P.E Elizabethtown 

Coley, Helen, A.B Elizabeth City 

Collier, Jo Ann, B.S.S.A Pikeville 

Collins, Dottie, B.S.S.A Angier 

Collins, Macie, A.B Gastonia 

Constantinides, Edmofile, A.B Asheville 

Cook, Janet, A.B Goldsboro 

Cook, Joyce, A.B Driver, Va. 

Cooper, Jeannette, A.B South Charleston, W. Va. 

Cooper, Mary Helen, A.B Albemarle 

Cornelius, Barbara, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Correll, Jo Anne, B.M Concord 

Cowman, Beverly, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Crabtree, Patricia, A.B Bahama 

Craig, Margaret, B.F.A Greensboro 

Crawford, Margaret, B.F.A Raleigh 

Cross, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Reidsville 

Darden, Barbara Wells, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Darden, Eileen F., A.B Asheville 

Daughtridge, Peggy, A.B Rocky Mount 

Davenport, Joanne, B.S.S.A Creswell 

Davidson, Katherine, B.S.S.A Rockingham 

Davis, Betty Jean, B.S.S.A Pink Hill 

Davis, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Hillsboro 

Davis, Nora, A.B. Eureka 

Davis, Ruth A., B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Davis, Ruth P., A.B. Leaksville 



254 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Deck, Peggie Jean, B.S.S.A Cliffside 

Decker, Lorraine, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Deskins, Julia, B.M Greensboro 

DeViney, Mary Jane, B.S.S.A Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Dickey, Bruce, B.S.S.A Dunn 

TDirickson, Rebekah, A.B Salisbury, Md. 

Dixon, Annie Franklin, A.B Belmont 

Dixon, Barbara Lee, A.B Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Dixon, Evelyn, A.B Belmont 

Dobyns, Barbara, A.B Washington, D.C. 

Doggett, Joanna, B.S.S.A Kernersville 

Draughon, Betty, B.S.H.E Dunn 

Easterling, Louise, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Echols, Freda, A.B Asheville 

Edmondson, Peggy, A.B Rocky Mount 

Edwards, Janie, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Edwards, Nancy, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Egerton, Sue, B.S.S.A Mill Spring 

Eldred, Sara, B.S.P.E Isle of Palms, S. C. 

Ellinger, Patsy, A.B Chapel Hill 

Ensley, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E _ Clyde 

Etchison, Betty, A.B Cana 

Evans, Ethel Mae, A.B London Bridge, Va. 

Evans, Frances, A.B Asheville 

Evans, Nancy, A.B Northfork, W. Va. 

Faison, Marion, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Farah, Priscilla, B.F.A Rock Hill, S. C. 

Farah, Rosemond, A.B Mount Olive 

Farlowe, Bouneva, B.S.P.E Sophia 

Farmer, Ellen, B.F.A Charlotte 

Farrell, Jean, A.B . Apex 

Fetzer, Anne, A.B Reidsville 

Finch, Julia, A.B Henderson 

Finley, Patsy, A.B Cramerton 

Fish, Geraldine, A.B Clyde 

Fisher, Dorothy, A.B Fayetteville 

Floyd, Joanne, B.S.S.A Granite Falls 

Ford, Anne, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Fortune, Marian, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Fox, Nancy, A.B Chatham, Va. 

Francis, Ann, B.S.H.E Smethport 

Francis, Elaine, A.B Waynesville 

Franklin, Phyllis, A.B Asheville 

Fredriksen, Patricia, A.B Raleigh 



Student List 255 

Freeman, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Star 

Fuller, Mildred, A.B Pisgah Forest 

Fulton, Barbara, B.S.S.A Walnut Cove 

Garrison, Clelia, B.F.A Clinton, S. C. 

Gastineau, Grace, B.S.S.A Lillington 

Gatewood, Maud, A.B Yanceyville 

Gattis, Mary Morgan, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Gee, Rowena, A.B Asheville 

Gibson, Earline, B.S.H.E Rockingham 

Gilbert, Nancy, A.B Absecon, N. J. 

Godbey, Doris Ann, B.S.H.E North Wilkesboro 

Goforth, Caroline, B.S.H.E Lenoir 

Goodwin, Jacqueline, A.B Hillboro 

Gosting, Patricia, B.S.P.E Glenside, Pa. 

Gravely, Jean, A.B Brevard 

Gray, Patricia, A.B Charlotte 

Graybeal, Nancy, A.B West Jefferson 

Green, Margaret, B.F.A Lillington 

Greene, June Carol, B.S.H.E Shelby 

Griffin, Alice, A.B Williamston 

Grissom, Annie, A.B Louisburg 

Hagan, Betty, Jean, A.B Gastonia 

Hamrick, Mable, B.S.H.E Mooresville 

Haroutunian, Anoush, A.B Teheran, Iran 

Harris, Barbara Ann, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Harris, Frances, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Harris, Jean, B.S.H.E Carthage 

Harris, Virginia Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Harris, Virginia Johnson, A.B Hartsville, S. C, 

Harrison, Lota L., A.B Old Trap 

Harrison, Sarah, A.B Greenville, S.C. 

Harriss, Laura, A.B Wilmington 

Hart, Sharon, A.B Greensboro 

Hazard, Thelma, B.S.S.A Haw River 

Head, Nancy Ann, A.B Matthews 

Heafner, Jean, B.M Lincolnton 

Hedgepeth, Julia, B.S.P.E Lexington, Va. 

Hedrick, Mary Dean, B.S.S.A Lexington 

Heinsberger, Patricia, B.S.S.A Lumberton 

Hemphill, Rebecca, B.S.P.E Marion 

Henkel, Sarah, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Herman, Frankie, A.B Conover 

Hill, Anne, B.F.A Kernersville 

Hill, Betty Jo, A.B Newport 



256 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hill, La Rue, B.S.H.E Smithfield 

Hill, M. Louise, B.S.S.A . Charlotte 

Hill, Nancy, A.B High Point 

Hobgood, Carrie, A.B Oxford 

Hodges, Sue, A.B Dover 

Holcomb, Edith, A.B Yadkinville 

Holland, Ashley, A.B Greensboro 

Holland, Elizabeth, A.B Olin 

Holton, May A.B Wilmington 

Hood, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Burgaw 

Horn, Joanne, A.B Lawndale 

Houser, Jeanette, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Houston, Catherine, B.S.H.E Matthews 

Houston, Jean, A.B Lenoir 

Hughes, Patricia, A.B Asheboro 

Hughes, Willie Green, A.B Myrtle Beach, S. C. 

Irby, Alice Joyner, A.B Greensboro 

Irvin, Avis, B.S.H.E Huntersville 

Irvin, Martha L., A.B Hendersonville 

Jackson, Frances, A.B Washington 

Jarvis, Ann, B.S.H.E Mooresville 

Johnson, Willia, B.S.H.E Statesville 

Jones, Christine, A.B Winston-Salem 

Jones, M. Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Thomasville 

Jones, Faye Conn, B.S.S.A Henderson 

Jordan, Peggy, B.S.H.E. .' Smithfield 

Kearns, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Keever, Mary Ann, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Keith, Carole, A.B Greensboro 

Keller, Katharine, A.B Darien, Conn. 

Kimrey, Ann, A.B Clinton 

Kipka, Kathryn, A.B Mooresville 

Knott, Julia, B.S.H.E Clayton 

Koenig, Sue, A.B Burnsville 

Koonts, Carolyn, A.B Lexington 

Kunz, Roberta, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Kunze, Jane, B.S.P.E Leaksville 

Kuykendall, Helen, B.S.P.E Madison 

Lambeth, Corinne, A.B Lumberton 

Lamons, Sally, B.S.P.E Atlanta, Ga. 

Landers, Llewellyn, A.B Winston-Salem 

Landrum, Patricia, A.B Franklin 



Student List 257 

Lane, Rebecca, A.B Wilmington 

Laseter, Katherine, A.B Pisgah Forest 

Lashley, Barbara, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Lashley, Martha, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Latta, Patricia, A.B Mebane 

Lee, Agnes, B.S.H.E Benson 

Lefler, Ann, A.B Norwood 

Lenhardt, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Lentz, Tommie, A.B High Point 

Leonard, Hope, A.B Greensboro 

Leonard, Shirley, B.M Greensboro 

Lepley, Jane, A.B Philidelphia, Pa. 

Levens, Nellie Gray, A.B Gibsonville 

Lewis, Nancy, A.B High Point 

Liles, Virginia, A.B Garland 

Limehouse, Grace, A.B Summerville, S. C. 

Litch, Carole, A.B Greensboro 

Little, Araminta, B.S.P.E Salisbury 

Livingstone, Anne, A.B Asheville 

Long, Alice Millwood, B.S.S.A Seaboard 

Long, June, A.B Dobson 

Long, Ruth, B.S.H.E Cornelius 

Long, Trevaleah, A.B Roanoke, Va. 

Lovette, Janelle, B.M Asheville 

Lovin, Mary Lee, A.B Robbinsville 

Luffman, Jean, B.M State Road 

McAlister, Carol, A.B Biscoe 

McDuffie, Jane, A.B St. Pauls 

McGuffin, Jeanne, A.B Raleigh 

McLees, Emily, B.M Anderson, S. C. 

McLellan, Barbara, A.B Charlotte 

McLeod, Emmalen, A.B Greenville, S. C. 

McMahan, Patricia, A.B Greensboro 

McRainey, Mary Louise, A.B Lumberton 

McSwain, Betty, B.S.S.A Thomasville 

Mackey, Elizabeth, B.M Charlotte 

Madison, Sally Anne, B.S.H.E Jonesville 

Magnuson, Lois, A.B Wilmington 

Mallard, Barbara, A.B Raleigh 

Malone, Sarah, B.S.P.E Gastonia 

Mangum, Ruth, B.S.S.A Angier 

Martin, Jeanne, A.B Greensboro 

Mason, Rebecca, A.B Yadkinville 

Masters, Billie Irene, B.F.A Henderson 

May, Jane, B.S.S.A Charlotte 



258 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Merriman, Anne, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Messer, Frances, B.S.H.E Bat Cave 

Mialik, Joan, A.B Greensboro 

Michalove, Maxine, B.S.S.A Forest City 

Miller, Diane, A.B Arden 

Mills, Evelyn, B.S.S.A Richlands 

Mills, Jean Carroll, A.B Apex 

Mitchell, Barbara, A.B Brown Summit 

Mitchell, Peggy Jo, A.B Wilson 

Mizell, Stella, A.B Palmyra 

Moore, Martha, A.B „ Albemarle 

Morris, Clara, A.B Charlotte 

Morrison, Virginia, A.B Laurel Hill 

Murphy, Charlotte, B.S.H.E Tomahawk 

Myers, Gertrude, A.B Wilmington 

Myers, Nell, B.M Clayton 

Neelands, Kay, A.B North Augusta, S. C. 

Neill, Nancy, A.B Charlotte 

Nichols, Claudine, B.S.S.A North Wilkesboro 

Nichols, Sue, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Nicolas, Georgia, A.B Winston-Salem 

Norris, Nancy, A.B Holliston, Mass. 

Nunn, Betty Ann, A.B Winston-Salem 

Oppenheimer, Rena Furlong, A.B Hickory 

Page, Julia, B.S.H.E Boonville 

Parker, Beverly, A.B Sunbury 

Parker, Joan, A.B Oxford 

Parsons, Arlene, B.S.S.A Mount Gilead 

Parsons, Virginia, B.M Greensboro 

Paschal, Nancy, B.S.S.A Siler City 

Pasour, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Dallas 

Paul, Mary-Frazier, A.B Beaufort 

Peck, Irene, B.S.S.A Shelby 

Perkins, Winifred, A.B Fork Union, Va. 

Perry, Peggy, A.B. Enfield 

Peterson, Elizabeth, A.B Clinton 

Peterson, Madeline Johnston, B.S.H.E Durham 

Petree, Nancy, A.B Winston-Salem 

Phelps, Annie Lois, B.S.H.E Ash 

Phillips, Carolyn, A.B Ingalls 

Phillips, Lillian, A.B Rocky Mount 

Phillips, Pattie, A.B Hertford 

Pickett, Emma Bells, B.S.S.A Greensboro 



Student List 259 

Pickett, Miriam, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Pinyan, Patricia, B.M Greensboro 

Plaster, Daphne, A.B Winston-Salem 

Ponder, Anna Lee, B.S.H.E Leicester 

Preisinger, Margie Anne, A.B Badin 

Price, Elizabeth, A.B Windsor 

Price, Janet, A.B Greensboro 

Pritchett, Margaret, B.M Greensboro 

Pugh, Clara, A.B Graham 

Putnam, Elizabeth, A.B Waco 

Ragan, Jean, A.B „ Lexington, Va. 

Raney, Mary Ann, B.S.S.A. Raleigh 

Rash, Joan E., B.S.H.E Asheville 

Reason, Peggy, A.B Walstonburg 

Reeves, Lora Lea, A.B Fayetteville 

Reilly, Gail, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Rhodes, Patsy, A.B West Asheville 

Roberts, Jean, B.S.H.E Willow Springs 

Roberts, Polly, B.S.P.E Hillsboro 

Roberts, Sandra, A.B Wilson 

Robertson, Ann, B.S.P.E Morristown, N.J. 

Robertson, F. Anne, A.B Gastonia 

Robinson, Anne, A.B Gastonia 

Robinson, Charlotte, B.S.S.A Marion 

Robinson, Harriet, B.F.A Kingsport, Tenn. 

Rose, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Pikeville 

Rothgeb, Anne, B.M Raleigh 

Russell, Gearl Dean, A.B Belmont 

Rypins, Frances, A.B Greensboro 

Saunders, Betty Ann, A.B Sanford 

Saunders, Perdita, B.S.P.E Reidsville 

Schleisner, Nan, A.B Harrisburg, Pa. 

Schukraft, Terrill, A.B Falls Church, Va. 

Scott, Joann, A.B Greensboro 

Selzer, Carol, B.S.H.E Rye, N.Y. 

Setzler, Barbara, B.S.S.A Albemarle 

Shankle, Nancy, A.B Troy 

Shaw, Gillie, A.B Fayetteville 

Sheffield, Leola, A.B Colfax 

Sherrill, Patsy, B.S.P.E Fayetteville 

Shields, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Marble 

Shore, Allene, B.S.P.E East Bend 

Shore, Anne, A.B Yadkinville 

Sledge, Josephine, A.B Rich Square 



260 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Smith, Carolyn, A.B Concord 

Smith, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Smithfield 

Smith, Jane Kirkman, A.B Greensboro 

Smith, Jo Ann, B.S.H.E Kernersville 

Snow, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Walkertown 

Somers, Betty Jean, B.S.S.A Elon College 

Spear, Karlyn, A.B Madison 

Spencer, Mary Anne, B.M Gastonia 

Spivey, Dorothy Jones, B.F.A Statesville 

Stamey, Margaret, A.B High Point 

Stancil, Betty, A.B Selma 

Stanfield, Patsy, A.B Brown Summit 

Stonham, Patricia, B.F.A Hendersonville 

Strother, Margaret, A.B Creedmoor 

Stroud, Peggy Jo, A.B Pink Hill 

Stutts, Gladys, B.M Rockingham 

Styron, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Durham 

Sutherland, Ruth, B.S.H.E Madison 

Sutton, Marian, A.B Kinston 

Swann, Margaret, A.B Statesville 

Taylor, Joyce, A.B Asheville 

Templeton, Betty, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Thomas, Patricia, A.B Hagerstown, Md. 

Thompson, Thelma, A.B Mountain Park 

Thrash, Mary George, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Tinder, Ann, B.S.S.A Bluefield, W. Va. 

Trepke, Sally, A.B High Point 

Tripp, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

Tucker, Laura Sprinkle, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Tucker, Mary Lane, A.B Whitakers 

Turner, Lois, B.M Wadesboro 

Umstead, Anne, B.S.H.E Chapel Hill 

Van Horn, June, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Vann, Nancy, B.S.H.E Rich Square 

Vener, Rhoda, A.B Charlotte 

Waddell, Jo Anne, B.S.H.E Malverne, N. Y. 

Walker, Mildred, A.B Bostic 

Walker, Nancy Alexander, A.B Hickory 

Wallace, Nancy, A.B Carthage 

Walling, Gladys, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Ward, Earlene V., B.S.S.A Asheboro 

Ward, Theresa, B.S.H.E Whitakers 



Student List 261 

Warner, Ann, A.B Raleigh 

Warren, Mildred, B.M Benson 

Washam, Martha, B.F.A Charlotte 

Watson, Jean, A.B Pinehurst 

Watts, Betty Jean, B.S.S.A Taylorsville 

Weaver, Pattie, B.S.H.E Red Oak 

Weiss, Suzanne, B.S.S.A Yonkers, N. Y. 

Werner, Barbara, A.B Charlotte 

West, Betty, A.B Warsaw 

Whitaker, Marie, A.B Kannapolis 

White, Isabelle, B.S.S.A Kinston 

Whiteside, Rebecca, A.B Gastonia 

Whitley, Jane, B.S.H.E Norwood 

Wible, Betty Jane, B.F.A Asheville 

Wier, Jo Anne, B.S.S.A Mount Airy 

Wiley, Dora Lee, A.B Loray 

Williams, Carole, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Williams, Catherine, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Williams, Polly, B.S.H.E Tryon 

Williams, Rebecca J., B.S.H.E Rose Hill 

Willis, Margaret, A.B Reidsville 

Wilson, Ruth Friddle, B.S.H.E Walnut Cove 

Winterling, Carolyn, A.B Charlotte 

Wise, Lillie Ellen, B.S.H.E Carthage 

Wofford, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

Wood, Jacqueline, A.B Camden 

Woodley, Katherine, B.S.H.E Elizabeth City 

Woolard, Barbara, A.B Washington 

Works, Billie Jo, A.B Rocky Mount 

Zahran, Frances, A.B Fayetteville 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Adams, Daphne, A.B Willow Springs 

Adams, Eleanor, A.B Winston-Salem 

Alexander, Frances, A.B Burlington 

Allen, Sarah, B.S.H.E Wadesboro 

Alston, Blair, B.S.S.A Wilson 

Anderson, Hesper, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Anderson, Mary Lois, B.S.H.E Bennettsville, S. C. 

Anderson, Shirley, A.B Rocky Mount 

Arnold, Jewell, A.B Fuquay Springs 

Atkins, Molly, B.M Durham 

Avent, Mary Baton, B.S.S.A Whitakers 



262 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Baggett, Henry, A.B Lillington 

Bailey, Marion, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Baker, Eva, B.S.H.E Rowland 

Banks, Martha, A.B Greensboro 

Banks, Melba Lee, A.B Maysville 

Barbour, Rachel, A.B Benson 

Barefoot, Lois, B.S.S.A Benson 

Barlow, Joel, B.S.S.A Hickory 

Barnard, Margaret, A.B Asheboro 

Barrier, Katherine, A.B Farmer 

Bartholomew, Nancy, A.B . . Rocky Mount 

Baucom, Emily, B.S.S.A Wilmington 

Beam, Patricia, A.B Shelby 

Beatty, Kay, B.S.H.E Haw River 

Beatty, Molly Jo, B.M Haw River 

Bell, Elizabeth, B.F.A Durham 

Bell, Mary Owens, B.S.H.E Fayetteville 

Bennett, Sara, A.B Charlotte 

Betz, Judith, A.B ^ . Hendersonville 

Bierman, Joan, A.B Coral Gables, Fla. 

Bigham, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Bivins, Mary, A.B Greensboro 

Bivins, Polly, A.B Elkin 

Blanchard, Betty, A.B New Bern 

Blanchard, Nancy, A.B Charlotte 

Bloom, Teasa, A.B High Point 

Blue, Barbara, B.S.S.A Aberdeen 

Boney, Dixie Lee, A.B Clinton 

Borts, Mary Ann, A.B Fayetteville 

Bowles, Ann, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Bradford, Carol, B.S.H.E Davidson 

Bradley, Anne, A.B Falls Church, Va. 

Breeland, Mary, A.B Aiken, S. C. 

Bright, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Rutherford College 

Bristol, Anne, A.B Andrews 

Brittain, Patricia, A.B Graham 

Brittain, Tommae, B.S.H.E Chapel Hill 

Broadwell, Maitland, A.B St. Pauls 

Broom, Elsie, A.B Monroe 

Brown, Ann, B.F.A Charleston, S. C. 

Brown, Autrey, B.S.H.E . . George 

Brown, O. Jean, A.B Wilmington 

Brown, Joan, A.B Coral Gables, Fla. 

Brown, Margaret, A.B Charlotte 

Brown, Mary Lee, B.S.H.E Spencer 

Brown, Roberta, A.B Rocky Mount 



Student List 263 

Browning, Martha, B.M Graham 

Bruton, Henrietta, A.B Lexington 

Bryson, Carolyn, B.S.P.E Cullasaja 

Burch, Margaret, B.S.S.A Wadesboro 

Burt, Ann H., A.B Biscoe 

Butts, Carroll, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Byerly, Caroline, A.B Durham 

Campbell, Anne, B.S.H.E Salisbury 

Campbell, Barbara, B.S.H.E Elizabethtown 

Campbell, Betty, B.S.P.E Denton 

Campbell, Karen, B.S.S.A Clinton 

Capps, Martha, A.B Gastonia 

Carlyle, Alice, B.S.S.A Burlington 

Carson, Marianne, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Carter, Barbara, B.S.E.A Reidsville 

Cashwell, Linn, B.S.S.A Mount Airy 

Caulder, Gertrude, A.B Fayetteville 

Chandler, Geraldine, A.B Marshall 

Chapin, Patrick, A.B Lillington 

Chapman, Brent, A.B Charlotte 

Chatham, Diana, A.B Winston-Salem 

Childs, Katharine, A.B Wadesboro 

Christian, Jean, A.B Charlotte 

Christopoulo, Flora, B.S.S.A Charleston, S. C. 

Clark, Gwendolyn, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Clark, Mary Lou, A.B Reidsville 

Clark, Mary Ruth, B.S.S.A Vass 

Clement, Charlotte, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Clement, Linda, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Cline, Camilla, A.B Concord 

Cobb, Dolphine, B.S.H.E McLeansville 

Coburn, Marilyn, A.B Roanoke Rapids 

Cofer, Norma, B.F.A Winston-Salem 

Cohen, Janet, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cole, Nadine G., B.S.H.E Fayetteville 

Collins, Betty, A.B Kannapolis 

Collson, Charlotte, A.B Greensboro 

Colvard, Ann, B.S.S.A. Robbinsville 

Conner, Joan, A.B Charlotte 

Cooley, Millicent, A.B Asheville 

Cope, Martha Ann, A.B Landisville, Pa. 

Copelan, Sara, A.B Mooresville 

Core, Mary Josephine, A.B Marshallton, Del. 

Coulbourn, Eleanor, B.S.S.A Windsor 

Councill, Jimmie Louise, A.B Lenoir 



264 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Covington, Betty Jean, A.B Roanoke, Va. 

Covington, Betty Lou, B.S.S.A Whitsett 

Craig, Jean, B.S.P.E Haddonfield, N. J. 

Cralle, Beverly, B.F.A Charlotte 

Crews, Joyce, A.B Troutman 

Croce, Arlene, A.B Asheville 

Cromer, Lillian, A.B Tryon 

Crouse, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Lexington 

Crow, Margaret, A.B Wilson 

Currie, Kathryn, A.B Maxton 

Dalton, Frances, A.B Winston-Salem 

Daniel, Sonia, B.F.A Durham 

Daniel, Zora, B.F.A Durham 

Davis, Martha, A.B Charlotte 

Davis, Nancy, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Denhard, Jarrad, A.B Randallstown, Md. 

Dickerson, Jane, B.S.H.E ., Kittrell 

Dismuke, Sylvia, B.S.P.E Burlington 

Dixson, Janet, B.M Charlotte 

Dobson, Franda, A.B High Point 

Dove, Katherine, A.B Rocky Mount 

Duckworth, Marion, A.B Asheville 

Duncan, Claudia, A.B Monroe 

Dunn, Barbara, A.B Bladenboro 

DuPler, Carol, A.B Davidson 

Durham, Doris Ann, A.B Burgaw 

Earnhardt, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Eaton, Jacquelyn, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Eaton, Sylvia, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Edwards, Harriet, A.B Rockwell 

Edwards, Jane, A.B Rutherfordton 

Elliott, Barbara, A.B Chadbourn 

Ennis, Janet, A.B Erwin 

Eppley, Anita, B.M Jamestown 

Falls, Carolyn, A.B Shelby 

Ferebee, Dorothy, A.B Windsor 

Ferguson, Janie Mae, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Fisher, Barbara, A.B Huntersville 

Fisher, Hazel, B.S.S.A Salisbury 

Fleming, Ina Sue, B.S.S.A Boonville 

Fleming, Nancy, A.B Grimesland 

Floyd, Nancy, A.B Lumberton 

Flynt, Alice, A.B Crossnore 



Student List 265 

Forrest, Mary, A.B Raleigh 

Fuller, Joan Marie, A.B Greensboro 

Gabriel, Norma, B.S.P.E North Wilkesboro 

Gaines, Shirley, B.S.S.A Jamesville 

Garner, Margie, A.B Pinehurst 

Garrison, Imogene, B.S.H.E Burlington 

Gaulden, Terry Odiene, B.M Greensboro 

Gibbs, Audrey Lee, A.B Gastonia 

Gibson, Carolyn, A.B Greensboro 

Gill, Joellen, B.S.P.E Zebulon 

Giroud, Carol, B.S.P.E Sewaren, N. J. 

Glenn, Patricia, A.B Henderson 

Gordon, Patricia, B.S.H.E Mount Airy 

Graham, Emily, A.B Erwin 

Graham, Jane, A.B Charlotte 

Gravely, Carolyn, B.S.H.E. Brevard 

Green, Frances, B.M Raleigh 

Greene, Janet, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Greene, Virginia, A.B Charlotte 

Greer, Phyllis, A.B Greensboro 

Griffin, Evelyn, B.F.A Marshville 

Griffin, Jean Carole, B.S.S.A Williamston 

Griffin, Ruth, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Guthery, Sory, A.B Charlotte 

Haacke, Ruth, A.B Santiago, Chile 

Hall, Ernestine, B.S.H.E High Point 

Hammond, Jean, A.B Hendersonville 

Hammond, Joan, A.B Hendersonville 

Hamrick, June, A.B Mount Holly 

Hansbarger, Mary Lee, B.S.H.E Logan, W. Va. 

Harding, Lillian, A.B Charlotte 

Harkey, Jill, B.F.A Charlotte 

Harrell, Betty Jo, B.S.P.E Wilson 

Harrelson, Patsy Ann, B.F.A Hendersonville 

Harris, Clairene, A.B Seaboard 

Harris, Peggy, B.S.P.E North Wilkesboro 

Hart, Mary Ruth, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Hartsell, Jayne, A.B Charlotte 

Hartsell, Wayne, A.B Charlotte 

Harvel, Betty Lou, B.S.S.A Biscoe 

Harvey, Betty Jane, A.B Winston-Salem 

Harward, Lois, B.S.H.E Norwood 

Hawfield, Cary, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Hawkins, Ruth, B.M Greensboro 



266 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hawley, Effie, A.B Florence, S. C. 

Hayes, Joyce, A.B Wilmington 

Haynes, Helen, A.B Reidsville 

Hearn, Sara Beth, B.M Kinston 

Heaton, Elizabeth, B.M Andrews 

Hege, Pearlie, A.B Lexington 

Heiberger, Cordaire, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Helms, Jewel, A.B Yanceyville 

Hemrick, Phyllis, A.B Winston-Salem 

Herring, Mary, A.B Towson, Md. 

Hicks, Grace, A.B Henderson 

Hicks, Joan, A.B Wilson 

Higgins, Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Hill, Elaine, A.B Brevard 

Hill, Margaret, B.S.H.E Wilmington 

Hill, Mary Lou, B.S.H.E Faison 

Hix, Julia Frances, A.B Thomasville 

Hobbs, Elizabeth, A.B Walstonburg 

Hobgood, Mary, A.B Oxford 

Hollis, Carolyn, B.M Raleigh 

Holt, Jane, B.F.A Biltmore 

Holtzman, Evelyn, B.M Manson 

Honeycutt, Phyllis, B.S.S.A Portsmouth, Va. 

Hopkins, Marian, B.S.H.E. Brown Summit 

Horn, Jane, B.S.H.E Lawndale 

Home, Rose, A.B Liberty 

Howell, Ann, A.B Oxford 

Hudson, Joan, A.B Greensboro 

Hudspeth, Peggy, A.B Yadkinville 

Huffman, Larue, B.S.H.E Hickory 

Huffman, Sally, B.S.H.E Pfafftown 

Humphrey, Carol, A.B Southern Pines 

Hunter, Marian, A.B Charlotte 

Hurt, Rebecca, A.B Greensboro 

Hutchison, Claire, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Hutton, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Ingold, Jean, A.B Fayetteville 

Ingram, Evadeane, B.S.H.E Princeton 

Ingram, Jean, B.S.H.E Taylorsville 

Inscoe, Bettye Lou, B.M Louisburg 

Isley, Lalah Perkins, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Ison, Tirzah, A.B Charlotte 

Jackson, Mary Lou, A.B Charlotte 

Jarrett, Janet, A.B Shelby 



Student List 267 

Jenkins, Elizabeth, A.B Fayetteville 

Jensen, Karen Ann, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnson, Ida Jane, A.B Huntersville 

Johnson, Rose, A.B Smithfield 

Jones, Ann S., A.B Charlotte 

Jones, Elizabeth H., A.B Franklin 

Jones, Lois, B.S.H.E Pembroke 

Jones, Melissa, A.B St. Augustine, Fla. 

Jones, Patricia, A.B Winston-Salem 

Jones, Phyllis, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

Jones, Ruth E., A.B Charlotte 

Jordan, Rebecca, A.B Charlotte 

Joyner, Alice E., B.S.H.E Rocky Mount 

Joyner, Sara, A.B Rocky Mount 

Kanter, Jean, B.S.H.E Kinston 

Kauffman, Frances, B.S.H.E Camden, N. J. 

Kearns, Joan, A.B Lexington 

Kerr, Katherine, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Kime, Virginia, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Kirby, Amelia, B.S.P.E Supply 

Kiser, Inez, B.S.H.E Stanley 

Kiser, Louise, A.B Statesville 

Kizziah, Rosalie, A.B Salisbury 

Kjosnes, Ellen, B.F.A Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Kjosnes, Unni, A.B Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Kluttz, Sally, A.B Albemarle 

Lackey, Helen, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Lambeth, Nettie, A.B Lumberton 

Lambeth, Peggy A.B Brown Summit 

Land, Barbara, A.B Rocky Mount 

Lassiter, Sarah, B.S.H.E Wilmington 

Layton, Mary, A.B Charlotte 

Leigh, Shandy, A.B Rockingham 

Lemmond, Barbara, B.S.P.E Matthews 

Lentz, Carolyn, A.B Greensboro 

Lewis, Mary Gantt, A.B Durham 

Lind, Virginia, B.S.P.E Willimantic, Conn. 

Linzy, Barbara, A.B Statesville 

Lipman, Shirley, B.S.N Beaufort 

Long, Patricia, A.B Rutherfordton 

Lott, Anne, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Lovingood, Jane, A.B Asheville 

Lumsden, Gayle, B.M Concord 

Lynch, Louise, A.B Newton 



268 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

McClelland, Annie Brown, A.B Statesville 

McDill, Mary, A.B Fayetteville 

McDonald, Elizabeth, B.M Rockingham 

McDonald, Pollyanna, A.B Rockingham 

McDuffie, Patty, B.S.P.E Paw Creek 

Mclntyre, Jean, A.B Red Oak 

McKeithan, Jane, A.B Raeford 

McLeod, Jacqueline, A.B Lillington 

McNeely, Katherine, B.M Morganton 

MacPhail, Doris, A.B Arlington, N. J. 

McQuague, Nancy, B.F.A Wadesboro 

McRainey, Mary D., A.B Fayetteville 

Malis, Helen, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Martin, Hirst, B.S.H.E Richmond, Va. 

Mason, Anne, B.S.H.E Yadkinville 

Massey, Laura Jean, A.B Zebulon 

Mauney, Elizabeth, A.B Newton 

Maynard, Angelyn, B.S.H.E Kerr 

Mayo, Elizabeth, A.B Rocky Mount 

Melvin, Barbara, A.B Charlotte 

Merz, Louise, A.B Catonsville, Md. 

Messick, Mildred, A.B Lenoir 

Michaels, Judith, A.B Durham 

Miller, Alice, A.B Hickory 

Miller, Ruth, A.B Hillsboro 

Miller, Vivian, B.M High Point 

Mills, Jacqueline, A.B Statesville 

Mink, Ellen, A.B East Orange, N. J. 

Minor, Peggy, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Moore, Betty, B.S.S.A Reidsville 

Moore, Emogene, A.B Elon College 

Moore, Helen, A.B Ahoskie 

Moore, Laura, B.S.H.E Lenoir 

Moore, Marie, B.S.H.E Statesville 

Moores, Judith, A.B Charlotte 

Morgen, Madeleine, A.B Manchester, N. H. 

Morris, Jane, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Morris, Margaret, A.B Oxford 

Morse, Melissa, A.B Raleigh 

Muller, Patricia, A.B Durham 

Munyon, Josephine, B.S.P.E Skyland 

Murray, Patricia, B.S.S.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Myers, Suzanne, A.B Lexington 

Nelson, Ruth, A.B Lenoir 

Newkirk, Willie, B.S.N Magnolia 



Student List 269 

Newsome, Eileen, B.S.H.E Danbury 

Newton, Elizabeth, A.B Highlands 

Nostrandt, Jeanne, A.B Danville, Va. 

Okey, Josephine, A.B Graham 

Olds, Shirley, B.S.H.E Donelson, Tenn. 

Olive, Joyce, B.S.S.A Olivia 

Oliver, Peggy, B.S.S.A Jefferson 

O'Neill, Shirley, B.S.P.E Morristown, N. J. 

Ormsby, Peggy, B.S.S.A Laurinburg 

Overing, Vinal, A.B Raleigh 

Owens, Anna Jane, A.B Wilson 

Painter, Ann, A.B Mount Holly 

Parrish, Harriet, A.B Fair Bluff 

Paton, Kathryn, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Patton, Patricia, A.B Hickory 

Paul, Penelope, A.B Fort Bragg 

Peach, Mary Louise, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Permenter, Patricia, A.B Aiken, S. C. 

Petteway, Eugenia, A.B Jacksonville 

Philbeck, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Shelby 

Phillips, Ruth, A.B Middlesex 

Pickett, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Pickett, Suzanne, A.B Winston-Salem 

Pillatt, Barbara, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Porcher, Margaret, A.B Pinopolis, S. G. 

Porter, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Powell, Sara Ann, A.B Lenoir 

Rabil, Mary Louise, A.B Weldon 

Ramsey, Clara, A.B Marshall 

Ramsey, Patricia, B.S.S.A Salisbury 

Randall, Mary Glenn, A.B Raleigh 

Ranson, Katherine, B.S.H.E Huntersville 

Rapp, June, B.S.S.A Westfield, N. J. 

Raynor, Marie, B.S.H.E Maple Hill 

Reece, Ann, A.B Rutherfordton 

Reese, Margaret, B.S.S.A Waynesville 

Reid, Elizabeth, A.B Winnabow 

Reins, Irene, A.B Winston-Salem 

Revelle, Martha, A.B Winston-Salem 

Revelle, Nancy, A.B Woodland 

Richardson, Maria, A.B Lilesville 

Rickert, Susan, B.M Statesville 

Riddle, Peggy Sue, A.B Winston-Salem 



270 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Ring, Alfrieda, A.B Asheville 

Ringer, Suzanne, A.B West Hartford, Conn. 

Rivenbark, Patricia, B.S.S.A New Bern 

Robinson, Gwendolyn, A.B Cherryville 

Rodgers, Flowe, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Rodgers, Suzanne, A.B Scotland Neck 

Rodgers, Vera Anne, B.S.H.E High Point 

Rogers, Sarah, A.B Durham 

Ronger, Barbara, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Rosenblath, May, A.B Shreveport, La. 

Rosenblum, Eva, A.B Willard 

Routh, Lurlei, A.B Greensboro 

Rowland, Barbara, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount 

Rowland, Mary Earle, B.S.P.E Kittrell 

Ruark, Joan, B.S.S.A Bennettsville, S. C. 

Ruddick, Patricia, A.B Wyckoff , N. J. 

Russell, Helen, A.B Winston-Salem 

Sams, Edyth, A.B Marshall 

Sanderford, Barbara, B.S.S.A Cary 

Sanders, Julie, A.B Tryon 

Sanders, Mary, A.B Smithfield 

Savage, Jane, A.B Raleigh 

Sawyer, Lou Alice, A.B Salemburg 

Schilthuis, Alida, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Seawell, Jean, B.S.H.E Carthage 

Sexton, Betty, A.B Denton 

Shearin, Iola, A.B Roseboro 

Shearin, Lillie, A.B Essex 

Sheets, Jean, B.S.H.E Fairview 

Sheffield, Ellen, A.B Rose Hill 

Shepherd, Phyllis, A.B Winston-Salem 

Sherrill, Mariann, B.S.S.A Franklin 

Sherrill, Sarah, A.B Hickory 

Simmons, Barbara, A.B Charlotte 

Simmons, Lynda, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Simmons, Sidelle, B.S.S.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Slate, Peggy, A.B Thomasville 

Sledge, Billie, A.B Charlotte 

Smith, Barbara, B.S.N Greensboro 

Smith, Belle, B.S.H.E Atlanta, Ga. 

Smith, Jane, A.B Albemarle 

Smith, Lelia, B.S.P.E Rutherfordton 

Smith, Rebecca, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Smith, Sheila, B.S.P.E Atlanta, Ga. 

Snider, Jennie, A.B Salisbury 



Student List 271 

Spivey, Jean, A.B Raleigh 

Sprinkle, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Spruill, Elizabeth Ann, B.S.S.A Windsor 

Squires, Rebecca, A.B Greensboro 

Stafford, Mary Ann, A.B Greensboro 

Stallings, Dean, B.S.S.A Jamesville 

Stanford, Jane, A.B Chapel Hill 

Stanford, Jean, A.B Chapel Hill 

Stanley, Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Stapleford, Marguerite, A.B Durham 

Starling, Nannette, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Starnes, Patsy Ann, B.S.H.E Monroe 

Starrette, Sue, A.B Charlotte 

Steelman, Barbara, A.B Kinston 

Steifle, Jerrine, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Stevens, Anne, A.B Lynchburg, Va. 

Stevens, Margaret, B.S.H.E Goldsboro 

Stewart, Ann, A.B Reidsville 

Stewart, Gaye, A.B Great Neck, N. Y. 

Stikeleather, Catherine, B.S.H.E Taylorsville 

Stone, Doris, A.B Princeton 

Stowe, June, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Stradley, George, A.B Asheville 

Strawbridge, Ellen, B.S.P.E Henderson 

Strickland, Scott, A.B Carolina Beach 

Strother, Thomasine, A.B High Point 

Stuhl, Adrianne, A.B Fayetteville 

Surratt, Jane, B.F.A Denton 

Swope, Mary, A.B Newton, Mass. 

Tarr, Marcia, A.B Deal, N. J. 

Tatum, Geraldine, B.M Vicksburg, Miss. 

Taylor, Nancy Lee, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Teague, Nancy Moore, B.M Martinsville, Va. 

Terradas, Ana, A.B Camaguey, Cuba 

Tesh, Betty, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Tesh, Peggy, A.B Winston-Salem 

Teufel, Julia Mae, A.B Staunton, Va. 

Thomas, Donna Jane, A.B Winston-Salem 

Thomas, Peggy, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Thomas, Velma, B.S.S.A Cameron 

Tillinghast, Anne, A.B Upperco, Md. 

Tillman, Jo Ann, A.B Carthage 

Timmons, Mary Banks, A.B Asheville 

Todd, Ann, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Townsend, Kendrick, B.S.P.E Lumberton 



272 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Toy, Eleanor, B.F.A New Brunswick, N. J. 

Trollinger, Sara, B.S.H.E Asheboro 

Turner, Ethel Ann, A.B Wallace 

Wagoner, Jeanne, B.S.P.E Wadesboro 

Walbach, Mary, B.S.S.A Wilmington 

Walker, Nancy Anne, A.B Summerfield 

Walker, Ruth, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Walker, Sue, A.B Currie 

Wall, Lula, B.S.P.E Lilesville 

Wall, Mary Anne, A.B Wadesboro 

Wall, Mary Helen, B.S.S.A Micro 

Waller, Mary, A.B Fair Bluff 

Ward, Esther, A.B Mount Holly 

Warlick, Patricia, A.B Statesville 

Warlick, Rachel, B.M Gastonia 

Warren, Clarisse, A.B Salemburg 

Weadon, Elaine, B.M Brown Summit 

Weatherly, Sylvia, A.B Washington 

Weaver, Gloria Anne, B.S.S.A Shelby 

Weaver, Jeanette, A.B Raleigh 

Weeks, Emily, B.S.S.A Enfield 

West, Donez, B.S.S.A Franklin 

White, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

White, D'Orsay, A.B Altamont 

White, Janice, B.M Lynchburg, Va. 

White, Peggy, B.S.H.E Kinston 

Whitley, Elizabeth Ann, B.S.S.A Enfield 

Whitsett, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Whitty, Helen, B.S.H.E New Bern 

Wilhelm, Patty, A.B Mooresville 

Wilkinson, Barbara, A.B Maiden 

Williams, Kathryn, B.M Monroe 

Williams, Lucille, A.B Goldsboro 

Wilson, Barbara, B.S.S.A . Greensboro 

Wimbish, Lottie, A.B Graham 

Winfrey, Betty, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Winkler, Mary Evelyn, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Winstead, Ann, A.B Wendell 

Wolfe, Peggy, A.B Mount Olive 

Wolfe, Phyllis, A.B Fayetteville 

Wood, Martha, B.F.A Stafford, Va. 

Woodard, Ann, B.S.H.E Chapel Hill 

Woodley, Jean, B.S.H.E Columbia 

Woodson, Joanna, A.B Greensboro 

Wright, Nancy, A.B Landis 



Student List 273 

Young, Nancy C, A.B Reidsville 

Zager, Marlyn, A.B Greensboro 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Abbott, Carole, A.B Landsdowne, Pa. 

Abell, Faye, A.B Smithfield 

Abell, Nancy, A.B McLean, Va. 

Adams, Beverly, B.S.H.E Asheville 

Adams, Evelyn M., A.B Henderson 

Adams, Ruth A., B.S.P.E Dalton, Mass. 

Albert, Alice F., B.S.S.A Shelby 

Alexander, Anne, B.M Gastonia 

Allen, Eleanor, A.B Shelby 

Allen, Frances, B.S.H.E Hayesville 

Allen, Marietta, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Allen, Polly, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Amouri, Ann, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Anderson, Betty, B.S.S.A Yadkinville 

Anderson, Dorothy, A.B Washington 

Anderson, Mary Anne, B.S.S.A Robersonville 

Anderson, Mildred, B.S.S.A Aruba, Netherland West Indies 

Andrews, Nancy, B.M Durham 

Annis, Beverly, A.B Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Armstrong, Sarah, A.B Aruba, Netherland West Indies 

Arnold, Medora, A.B. Elkins, W. Va. 

Arnold, Virginia, A.B Ridgewood, N. J. 

Arrant, Joanne, A.B Brasstoa 

Ashworth, Rita, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Atkinson, Joan, A.B Greenville 

Aydlett, Phoebe, A.B Elizabeth City 

Bagwell, Mary, A.B Hendersonville 

Bain, Carolyn Sue, B.S.S.A Hickory 

Baird, Marilynne, A.B St. John's, Newfoundland 

Barnes, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Coats 

Barnes, Rebecca, B.S.S.A Lucama 

Barnes, Romaine, A.B Lucama 

Barnett, Edwina, B.S.H.E Durham 

Batholomew, Ann, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Baty, Sylvia Kathryn, A.B Camp Lejeune 

Baum, Mary Ann, A.B Merrick, N. Y. 

Beasley, Amaryllis, B.S.S.A Henderson 

Beasley, Carolyn, A.B Durham 



274 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Bebber, Kay, A.B Hiddenite 

Beck, Annette, A.B Morganton 

Becker, Mary Lou, B.S.S.A Jamestown 

Bell, Betty, A.B Elizabeth City 

Beltz, Marijane, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Benedict, Esther, A.B Kingsport, Tenn. 

Bennett, Lelah, B.S.H.E Princeton, W. Va. 

Berryman, Louise, A.B Asheville 

Birgel, Nancy, A.B Greensboro 

Bissett, Lou Ann, A.B Wilson 

Bivens, Patsy, A.B , Wadesboro 

Blaisdell, Dorothy, A.B Charlotte 

Blevins, Diana, A.B Grassy Creek 

Blue, LaVerne, A.B Mount Airy 

Bobbitt, Katherine, B.S.N Greensboro 

Bolard, Linda, B.S.S.A Meadville, Pa. 

Bondurant, Joan, A.B Reisterstown, Md. 

Bonner, Ellen, A.B Raleigh 

Boomer, Barbara, A.B Charleston, S. C. 

Bost, Gail, A.B Kannapolis 

Bowen, Rebecca, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Bowers, Shirley, A.B Winston-Salem 

Bowman, Jean, B.S.H.E Brown Summit 

Bowman, Joanne, B.S.N Brown Summit 

Boyd, Lois, A.B Roanoke Rapids 

Boyette, Faye, A.B Wilson 

Braddock, Anne, A.B Morganton 

Bransford, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

Bratten, Elizabeth, A.B Winston-Salem 

Breitbart, Myrna, B.S.P.E Bloomfield, N. J. 

Breithaupt, Virginia, A.B Upper Montclair, N. £. 

Brenn, Patricia, B.S.P.E Brooklyn, Conn. 

Bridgers, Nancy, A.B Goldsboro 

Bright, Nancy, B.S.H.E High Point 

Britt, Yvonne, A.B Lumberton 

Brooks, Janet, A.B Greensboro 

Broome, Nancy, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Brothers, Winona, A.B Elizabeth City 

Broughton, Mary Vic, B.S.H.E Zebulon 

Brown, Fay, A.B Four Oaks 

Brown, Mary W., A.B Winston-Salem 

Brown, Orlando, A.B Boone 

Brown, Shirley, B.S.H.E Selma 

Browne, Patricia, B.S.S.A Ramseur 

Bruce, Paula, B.S.S.A Atlanta, Ga. 

Bryant, Barbara, B.S.P.E Winston-Salem 



Student List 275 

Buie, Annie Pearl, B.S.S.A Bladenboro 

Bull, Alice, B.S.P.E Greenville, S. C. 

Burgin, Jean, B.F.A Charlotte 

Burkett, Barbara, A.B Woodville 

Burns, Suzann, A.B Southern Pines 

Burroughs, Frances, A.B Reidsville 

Burt, Patricia, A.B Greensboro 

Butler, Anne, A.B Kinston 

Butts, Louise, A.B Halifax 

Cameron, Annie, B.S.H.E Raeford 

Campbell, Beverly, A.B Greensboro 

Campbell, Mary Frances, A.B Nichols, S. C. 

Campbell, Mary Josephine, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Canada, Juliette, B.S.H.E Lynchburg, Va. 

Carcich, Barbara, A.B Havelock 

Carlton, Ann, A.B Morehead City 

Carroll, Pauline, A.B Zebulon 

Carson, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Carson, Patricia, A.B Statesville 

Carter, Colleen, A.B Kernersville 

Castelloe, Betsy, A.B Winterville 

Caton, Alice, B.M Concord 

Chandler, Barbara, A.B Burlington 

Clark, Constance, A.B Hendersonville 

Clark, Elizabeth, A.B Hendersonville 

Clark, Margaret, B.F.A Wilmington 

Clay, Kathryn, B.S.S.A Vilas 

Cline, Martha, A.B Hickory 

Coble, Patsy, A.B Greensboro 

Cochrane Peggie, B.S.H.E Arden 

Cofield, Annie, A.B Edenton 

Cole, Sarah Jane, A.B Raeford 

Coleman, Catherine, A.B Asheville 

Coleman, Phares, A.B Salisbury 

Collier, Carol, A.B Pikeville 

Comer, Chaney Lee, B.S.H.E Tryon 

Cooley, Carolyn, A.B Charlotte 

Coomes, Iva Sue, A.B Greensboro 

Cope, June, A.B Drexel 

Couch, Josephine, B.F.A Belmont 

Covington, Nellie, B.S.H.E Lawndale 

Cox, Faytie, B.S.H.E Moyock 

Coxwell, Bonnaleta, B.M Roanoke, Va. 

Crabtree, Shirley, A.B Selma 

Craig, Sara, B.S.S.A High Rock 



276 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Crawley, Mary Frances, A.B Morganton 

Creekmore, Judith, B.S.N Wilson 

Cresdy, Betty Lou, A.B Greensboro 

Crotts, Patricia, B.S.S.A Thomasville 

Crotts, Sybil, A.B Winston- Salem 

Crouser, Mary, A.B Waynesville 

Crumpler, Sue, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Crymes, Ann, B.S.S.A Oxford 

Curran, Shirley, A.B Reidsville 

Curtis, June, A.B Norwood 

Cuthrell, Jeannette, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Davenport, Peggy, B.S.H.E Portsmouth, Va. 

Daves, Barbara, B.F.A Lincolnton 

Davis, B. Ann, A.B Durham 

Davis, M. Ann, B.S.H.E Wade 

Davis, Hilda, A.B Pikeville 

Davis, Jessie, B.S.H.E Wake Forest 

Dawe, Lorraine, A.B East Longmeadow, Mass. 

Dawson, Carol, B.S.P.E Goldsboro 

Dean, Carolyn, A.B Wingate 

Deans, Carolyn, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Deese, Alice, A.B Lexington 

Dillard, Elizabeth, A.B Silver Springs, Md. 

Dixon, Billie Sue, B.F.A Sanford 

Dixon, June, B.S.S.A Statesville 

Dixon, Roberta, B.M Raleigh 

Doggett, Sudie, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Donalson, Dorothy, A.B Montgomery, W. Va. 

Dorman, Beverly, B.S.P.E Danielson, Conn. 

Doughton, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Sparta 

Dover, Mary Ann, A.B Shelby 

Dunham, Susan, A.B Cary 

Dunlap, Mary Cowles, A.B Kernesville 

Dunn, Elizabeth, A.B Leaksville 

Durham, Janet, B.S.H.E Burgaw 

Edgeworth, Betty Jean, A.B Wadesboro 

Edwards, Mary Wells, A.B Chocowinity 

Efird, Beda, A.B Marshville 

Elliott, Jane, A.B Gastonia 

Ellison, Judith, B.S.P.E Aiken, S.C. 

Elting, Mary Foster, B.S.P.E Roanoke Rapids 

Elzey, Betty, B.S.H.E Robbinsville 

English, Myrtle, A.B Maxton 

Etheridge, Doris, A.B Elizabeth City 



Student List 277 

Eubank, Jean, A.B Wilmington 

Evans, Madge, A.B Greensboro 

Everhart, Yvonne, A.B , Lexington 

Falls, Mary, B.S.S.A Gastonia 

Felmet, Betty, B.S.H.E Waynesville 

Ferebee, Hattie, A.B New Bern 

Ferguson, Barbara, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Fesperman, Patricia, A.B Asheville 

Finch, Kay, A.B Rocky Mount 

Firestone, Susan, A.B Brookline, Mass. 

Fisher, Audrey, B.S.S.A Durham 

Flake, Miriam, B.S.S.A Rockingham 

Fleishman, Rita, A.B Fayetteville 

Fleming, Mary, A.B Norlina 

Fletcher, Anita, A.B Raleigh 

Fletcher, Jean, B.S.S.A North Wilkesboro 

Foil, Betty Jean, A.B Mount Pleasant 

Folger, Sue, B.S.N High Point 

Forbes, Dixie, B.S.P.E Gastonia 

Foster, Edith, B.S.H.E Lexington 

Foster, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Ronda 

Frazier, Sylvia, A.B Louisburg 

Frederick, Janet, A.B Greensboro 

Freemon, Nan, A.B Burlington 

Freund, Ebba, A.B Raleigh 

Friar, Katherine, A.B Rocky Mount 

Friedman, Barbara, A.B Portsmouth, Va. 

Fulcher, Martha, B.S.N Davidson 

Gabriel, Patricia, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Gaines, Dorcas, B.S.H.E Fayetteville 

Galvin, Violet, B.M Fort Bragg 

Garrell, Mary Lois, A.B Claredon 

Garrett, Frances, A.B Mount Kisco, N. Y. 

Garrison, Ann, B.S.H.E McLeansville 

Geiger, Ruth, A.B Greensboro 

Gelburd, Selma, A.B Spartanburg, S. C. 

Godwin, Patricia, B.S.H.E Wilson 

Godwin, Rosa Kelly, A.B Wilmington 

Goldman, Margie, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Goldstein, Gilda, A.B Miami Beach, Fla. 

Goode, Juanita, A.B Mount Olive 

Goodwin, Maxine, B.F.A New Britain, Conn. 

Gorter, Johanna, B.S.S.A Enka 

Goslen, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Pfafftown 



278 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Graeber, Shirley, A.B China Grove 

Graham, Dixie, A.B Elkin 

Graham, Phyllis, B.S.H.E Mount Ulla 

Gray, Virginia, A.B Rocky Mount 

Green, Barbara J. Peterson, A. B Southern Pines 

Green, Eugenia, B.S.H.E k Ramseur 

Griffin, Jacqueline, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Griffin, Phyllis, B.F.A Charlotte 

Griset, Arlene, A,B Raleigh 

Gunderson, Belmar, B.S.P.E Army Chemical Center, Md. 

Gunnell, Peggy, A.B Mount Airy 

Hagan, Geraldine, A.B Gastonia 

Hall, Judith, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Hall, Julia, A.B Oxford 

Hall, Lee, B.F.A Lexington 

Hall, Lydia, B.S.S.A . . Yadkinville 

Harlow, Joan, B.S.H.E New Bern 

Harrell, Ann, B.M Suffolk, Va. 

Harrill, Nancy, A.B Salisbury 

Harrington, Vista, B.S.N Taylorsville 

Harris, Phyllis, A.B Charlotte 

Harris, Sheila, A.B Greensboro 

Hartle, Margaret, A.B Winston-Salem 

Hartman, Janice, B.S.P.E Summit, N. J. 

Hawkins, Caroline, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Haynes, Betty, A.B Reidsville 

Haynes, Lucy, A.B High Point 

Haynes, Nancy, A.B Albemarle 

Head, Carolyn, A.B Matthews 

Heath, Dina, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Helms, Virginia, B.S.N Albemarle 

Hemphill, Patricia, A.B Marion 

Herman, Virginia, A.B Taylorsville 

Herring, Margaret, A.B Wilson 

Herzberg, Elayne, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Heseltine, Mary Beth, B.S.S.A Schenectady, N. Y. 

Hickerson, Sara Ann, A.B Greensboro 

Hill, Anne, A.B , Ahoskie 

Hill, Christine, A.B Greensboro 

Hill, Jerry, A.B Fayetteville 

Hinnant, Louise, A.B Durham 

Hinshaw, Sue, A.B Sheridan, Ind. 

Hinson, Vivien, A.B Monroe 

Hinton, Peggy, A.B Mount Olive 

Hodge, Jacklyn, A.B Burlington 



Student List 279 

Hoke, Ann, B.S.P.E Morganton 

Holcombe, Janice, A.B Vass 

Holderby, Gail, A.B Reidsville 

Holderness, Jane-Howard, B.F.A Greensboro 

Holland, Margaret, A.B Gastonia 

Holliday, Tamara, A.B Rocky Mount 

Hollingsworth, Ann, A.B Spring Hope 

Holloman, Katie Dunn, B.S.S.A Selma 

Honeycutt, Vivian, A.B Kannapolis 

Hoover, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Concord 

Home, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Houser, Ann, A.B West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Howell, Henrietta, A.B High Point 

Howie, Jane, A.B Charlotte 

Huff, Anne, A.B Charlotte 

Hughes, Shirley, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Humphrey, Lee, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Humphrey, Margaret, A.B Richmond, Va. 

Hunt, Elizabeth, B.S.N Pleasant Garden 

Hutson, Patricia, B.F.A Winter Park, Fla. 

Hyatt, Yvonne, A.B Lexington 

Hyler, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Yanceyville 

Isley, Coanne, A.B Graham 

Jackson, Catherine, B.S.S.A Dobson 

Jackson, Lael, B.S.H.E Washington, D. C. 

Jarrell, Patricia, A.B Charlotte 

Jarrett, Kara, A.B Thomasville 

Jernigan, Helen, B.S.S.A Selma 

Jessup, Ruth, A.B Wichita, Kans. 

Johns, Lorraine, A.B Springfield, Md. 

Johnson, Mary Edith, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem 

Johnson, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Winston-Salem 

Johnston, Ann, A.B Charlotte 

Johnston, Natalie, A.B Mooresville 

Johnston, Virginia, A.B Charlotte 

Jones, Jo, A.B Marion 

Jones, Laurel, B.S.N Roxboro 

Jones, Marianne, B.S.S.A Mount Airy 

Jones, Miranda, A.B Reidsville 

Jordan, Marilyn, A.B Winston-Salem 

Jordan, Shirley, B.S.P.E Asheville 

Josack, Joan, B.F.A Charlotte 

Justice, Doris, A.B Rutherfordton 



280 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Kandel, Phyllis, A.B Miami Beach, Fla. 

Kannon, Patricia, A.B Wilmington 

Kaplan, Libby, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Karras, Helen, A.B Charlotte 

Kean, Ann, B.S.P.E Harrisonburg, Va. 

Kearney, Anne, B.M Greensboro 

Kelly, Barbara, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Kenerly, Margie, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Kennedy, Louise, B.S.S.A Robbins 

Kennedy, Virginia, A.B Asheville 

Ketner, Helen, B.S.H.E Hamlet 

Keys, Martha, A.B. Washington, D. C. 

Keyser, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Berwick, Pa. 

Keyser, Patricia, B.S.H.E Berwick, Pa. 

Kimel, Sarah, A.B Statesville 

Kirkman, Mary Catherine, A.B Greensboro 

Kitchen, Billie, B.S.S.A Waynesville 

Kluttz, Betty Ruth, A.B Concord 

Kluttz, Lewis, B.S.H.E Albemarle 

Krasny, Esther, B.S.S.A Danville, Va. 

Kyriakides, Hloy, A.B Portsmouth, Va. 

Lail, Roberta, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

LaMar, Gary Ann, B.S.N Leaksville 

Lamb, Peggy, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Lance, Mary June, A.B Arden 

Lanning, Lucinda, B.F.A Graham 

Lassiter, Mary Joanne, A.B Marion 

Latham, Betty Lou, A.B. Fayetteville 

Laughridge, Martha, A.B Rutherfordton 

Lawler, Virginia, B.S.S.A Camp Lejeune 

Lawton, Alice, B.S.H.E Wyckoff, N. J. 

Lazarr, Valentine, B.F.A Greensboro 

Leder, Marjorie, A.B Whiteville 

Lee, M. Elizabeth, A.B Durham 

Lee, Harrold, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Lemly, Marion, A.B Winston-Salem 

Lenox, Barbara, A.B Sumter, S. C. 

Lewis, Ellen, A.B Doraville, Ga. 

Liles, Sue, B.S.H.E Littleton 

Lingerfelt, Barbara, A.B High Point 

Linville, Frances, A.B Oak Ridge 

Linville, Nancy, A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Little, Christine, B.S.S.A Oakboro 

Little, Jane, A.B Charlotte 

Littlejohn, Jean. A.B Charlotte 



Student List 281 

London, Nancy, B.M Siler City 

Long, Edwina, B.S.H.E Mocksville 

Long, Joyce, A.B Rocky Mount 

Lovett, Clarajo, A.B | Asheboro 

Lovingood, Anna, A.B Fairview 

Lowrance, Mary, A.B. . . Statesville 

Luffman, Mabel, A.B Greensboro 

Luther, Elizabeth, A.B Winston-Salem 

McArthur, Anne, B.S.H.E Durham 

McBane, Patricia, A.B Burlington 

McCabe, Anne Moss, B.F.A Greensboro 

McCarthy, Patsy, B.S.S.A Morganton 

McClung, Jane, B.S.H.E Robbinsville 

McCrary, Mary Jo, B.S.H.E Brevard 

McDonald, Helen, B.S.H.E Carthage 

McDonald, Marianne, B.S.P.E Richmond, Va. 

McDuffie, June, B.S.N St. Pauls 

McGill, Joanne, A.B Fayetteville 

Mclntyre, Lucy, A.B Red Oak 

McKay, Marian, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

McKinney, Joyce, A.B Marshall 

McKinney, Nancy, A.B Sanford 

McLaughlin, Mary Vann, A.B Fayetteville 

McLean, Catherine, A.B Greensboro 

McLemore, Nancy, A.B Henderson 

McQueen, Charlotte, B.S.N Greensboro 

McWhorter, Nancy, A.B Beulaville 

Mabe, Peggy, B.S.S.A Stokesdale 

Madison, Mary, A.B Burlington 

Mallard, Libby, B.F.A Durham 

Mandel, Suzanne, A.B Highland Park, 111. 

Marcus, Debora, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Marshall, Virginia, B.M Jacksonville 

Martin, Eleanor, A.B. , Kingsport, Tenn. 

Mathews, Kathleen, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Matthews, Ruth, A.B Asheville 

Mauney, Joan, B.S.H.E Spindale 

May, Shirley, A.B Charlotte 

Mayes, Ann, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain 

Maynard, Helen, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Meacham, Jo Ann, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Meiggs, Frances, A.B Maple 

Mendenhall, Delmas, B.S.H.E Lewisville 

Merriman, Shirley, B.S.S.A Raleigh 

Midgett, Doreen, B.S.S.A Manteo 



282 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Miller, Jerita, A.B Greensboro 

Milton, Emily, B.S.S.A Albemarle 

Mirsky, Jill, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Misenheimer, Anne, A.B Concord 

Mitchell, Billy, A.B Denton 

Mitchell, Nancy, A.B Charlotte 

Mitchell, Susan, B.S.N Goldsboro 

Mollock, Rosalind, B.S.H.E Petersburg, Va. 

Moody, Carole, A.B Fayetteville 

Mooney, Brooks, B.F.A Weaverville 

Moore, Avis, B.S.H.E Walkertown 

Moore, Eddie, A.B Canton 

Moore, Elaine, A.B Walnut Cove 

Moore, Margaret A., A.B Greensboro 

Moore, Sara E., A.B Kinston 

Mordecai, Louisa, A.B Raleigh 

Morgan, Alice Rae, A.B Asheboro 

Morgan, Martha, B.S.H.E Raleigh 

Moring, Mary Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Morris, Lela, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Morrison, Elizabeth, A.B Bethesda, Md. 

Morton, Elizabeth, A.B Charlotte 

Moscatelli, Rita, A.B Rie de Janeiro, Brazil 

Moureau, Claire, B.S.P.E Currituck 

Muir, Gayle, A.B Winston-Salem 

Mullins, Martha, B.S.H.E Thomaston, Ga. 

Murray, Emma Jane, B.M Greensboro 

Myers, Judith, A.B Miami, Fla. 

Neese, Kenan, B.S.P.E Greensboro 

Neill, Caroline, A.B Charlotte 

Newman, Bobbie, A.B Greensboro 

Newsome, Carolyn, B.S.N Ahoskie 

Newton, Carolyn, A.B Faison 

Newton, Sidney, A.B West Point, Va. 

Nichols, Billie Rae, B.S.N Asheville 

Noland, Sue, A.B Candler 

Noller, Cleta Routh, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Noreen, Susan, A.B Charlotte 

Norris, Sue, A.B Holliston, Mass. 

O'Beirne, Karen, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Obropta, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Avenel, N. J. 

O'Kelley, Betty Jean, A.B Candler 

Orr, Margaret, A.B Garland 

Osborne, Marion, A.B Greensboro 



Student List 283 

Osteen, Shirley, A.B Florence, S. C. 

Overman, Frances R., A.B Charlotte 

Painter, Elsie, A.B Lincolnton 

Parham, Frances, A.B Oxford 

Parker, Vivian, A.B Fayetteville 

Parmele, Astrid, B.S.S.A Wilmington 

Parmele, Ingrid, B.S.S.A Wilmington 

Parris, Paula, A.B Asheville 

Parry, Pearl, B.S.S.A Windsor 

Paschal, Mary Jane, A.B Greensboro 

Pate, Helen, A.B Durham 

Patton, Mary, A.B Durham 

Paulson, Patsy, A.B Raleigh 

Payne, Faye, A.B. Elkin 

Payne, Margie, A.B High Point 

Penegar, Cassandra, A.B Monroe 

Penny, Sammy, A.B Chalybeate 

Perchan, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Elkins, W. Va. 

Perkins, Sara, A.B Greensboro 

Peterson, Nancy, B.M Winston-Salem 

Petrea, Patrica, B.S.H.E Mount Pleasant 

Pettit, Patsy, A.B Albemarle 

Pharr, Fay, A.B Statesville 

Phillips, Josephine, B.S.P.E Hickory 

Phillips, June, A.B Raleigh 

Phillips, Nancy, A.B Ingalls 

Phipps, Mary, A.B Wilkesboro 

Pierce, Sylvia, B.S.N Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pike, Jane, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Pittard, Carolyn, A.B Charlotte 

Poole, Shirley, B.F.A Raleigh 

Porter, Marlene, B.S.H.E Sanford 

Potts, Bettie, B.S.H.E Lewisville 

Prescott, Marion, B.S.P.E Raleigh 

Pritchard, Jeanne, A.B West Asheville 

Puckett, Violet Ruth, A.B Concord 

Pugh, Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Pullen, Sylvia, A.B Rocky Mount 

Pulliam, June, A.B Leaksville 

Purser, Joan, A.B Charlotte 

Quinn, Nancy, A.B Clemmons 

Ramseur, Joan, A.B Newton 

Ramsey, Kay, A.B. Asheville 



284 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Ranitz, Marlene, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Rawls, Anne, B.F.A Raleigh 

Ray, Glenda, B.F.A Washington, D. C. 

Reid, Chirley, A.B Mayodan 

Reinecke, Jane, A.B Fayetteville 

Reitzel, Hazel, A.B Efland 

Roan, Berntelle, B.S.S.A Cresco, Pa. 

Robertson, Elizabeth, A.B High Point 

Robinson, Alta, B.S.S.A Lenoir 

Rockett, Billie Mae, A.B Randleman 

Rogers, Betty, B.S.S.A Manteo 

Roope, Morguenya, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Rose, Margaret E., A.B Greensboro 

Rose, Margaret L., B.M Durham 

Rosenstock, Judith, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Ross, Peggie, A.B Macon 

Rucker, Gloria, A.B Wilmington 

Rudman, Patricia, A.B Martinsville, Va. 

Rutherford, Ann, A.B Falls Church, Va. 

Samet, Rose, A.B Asheboro 

Sanders, Susan, B.S.S.A Monroe 

Sasser, Reva, A.B Reidsville 

Saunders, Norma, A.B Reidsville 

Savage, Kay, B.S.H.E Kannapolis 

Scarborough, Kay, A.B Greenville, S. C. 

Schoonover, Beverly, A.B Kensington, Md. 

Schumann, Philomena, B.S.H.E Hickory 

Scott, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Lenoir 

Scott, Nell, A.B Goldsboro 

Scott, Sally, B.S.S.A Concord 

Scruggs, Anne, B.M Charlotte 

Sessums, Marian, B.F.A Durham 

Sette, Mary Louise, A.B Stamford, Conn. 

Shannon, Rachel, B.M Charlotte 

Shapiro, Beverly, A.B Miami, Fla. 

Sheek, Mary Sue, A.B Yadkinville 

Shelton, Ethel Lois, A.B Rocky Mount 

Shepard, Carolyn, A.B Chapel Hill 

Sherrill, Margaret, B.S.S.A Lenoir 

Sherrill, Mary Anne, A.B Kannapolis 

Shilhan, Dorothy, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Shinn, Jean, A.B Leaksville 

Shiver, Rebecca, A.B Charlotte 

Shoemake, Rebecca, A.B Boone 

Shoff, Beverly, A.B Binghampton, N. Y. 



Student List 285 

Shope, Cynthia, B.S.S.A Sanford 

Shuford, Betty, A.B Clinton 

Siddall, Mary Alice, A.B Sumter, S. C. 

Sides, Mary Ann, B.S.N Winston-Salem 

Simpson, June, B.S.H.E Charlotte 

Sitison, Corinne, A.B Mount Airy 

Skinner, Peggy Ann, B.S.H.E Whitakers 

Sloan, Barbara Ann, A.B Gastonia 

Smart, Ruth, A.B Forest City 

Smith, Adele, A.B Statesville 

Smith, Betty Ann, B.S.S.A Fayetteville 

Smith, LaTrelle, A.B Marion 

Smith, Laura, B.S.S.A Matthews 

Smith, Margaret, B.S.N Henderson 

Smith, Ruth, A.B Kernersville 

Smith, Sarah, A.B Sanford 

Smith, Thelma, B.S.H.E Draper 

Smith, Winifred, B.S.S.A Charlotte 

Snipes, Martha Jane, B.S.P.E Knoxville, Tenn. 

Somers, Geraldine, A.B Elon College 

Sowers, Jane, A.B High Point 

Sprinkle, Joan, A.B North Wilkesboro 

Stafford, Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro 

Stancil, Jackie, A.B Spring Hope 

Steelman, Bettie, B.S.S.A Hamptonville 

Stephens, Barbara, B.S.H.E Cary 

Stikeleather, Martha, A.B Florence, S. C. 

Stone, Coral Ann, B.S.H.E Portland, Ore. 

Strother, Helen, A.B Greensboro 

Stubblefield, Barbara, A.B Greensboro 

Sullivan, Mary Anne, A.B Mount Olive 

Summerfield, Rona, B.S.S.A Wilson 

Summers, Sandra, A.B Greensboro 

Sutton, Mary Dell, A.B Mount Olive 

Swaim, Pauline, A.B Winston-Salem 

Swain, Elizabeth, A.B Raleigh 

Szold, Stephanie, A.B Asheville 

Talbert, Sara Ann, A.B Guilford College 

Talbot, Anne, A.B Winston-Salem 

Talley, Mary, B.S.S.A Randleman 

Tatsey, Helen, A.B Oxford 

Taylor, Anne, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Taylor, Cynthia, A.B New Preston, Conn. 

Terry, Sybil Ann, A.B Douglaston, N. Y. 

Thomas, Helma Jean, A.B Lumberton 



286 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Thomas, Lu Anne, A.B Sanford 

Thompson, Ann, A.B Greensboro 

Thompson, Demetrial, A.B Lumberton 

Thompson, Gerotha, A.B Mountain Park 

Thompson, Gwendolyn, A.B Lenoir 

Thompson, Mary F., B.S.P.E Pikeville 

Thrower, Jo Ann, B.F.A Rockingham 

Thunberg, Ann, B.M Fayetteville 

Tillman, Joan, A.B Greensboro 

Tilton, Josephine, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Tinsley, Mary Jean, B.S.S.A High Point 

Towne, Ellen, A.B Kingsport, Tenn 

Trepke, Mary, B.S.N High Point 

Truett, Barbara Ann, A.B Bryson City 

Turner, Frances, A.B Staten Island, N. Y. 

Turner, Patricia, B.S.H.E Greensboro 

Turner, Ruth, A.B Henderson 

Tuttle, Gilda Gray, B.M Rural Hall 

Tysor, Joanne, B.S.S.A Asheboro 

]Jlmer, Nancy, A.B Hemingway, S. C. 

Underwood, Delaina, A.B Burlington 

Vanstory, Joann, B.S.H.E Olin 

Vaughan, Patricia, A.B Greensboro 

Veney, Norma, A.B Rutherfordton 

Vogler, Jackie, B.M Mount Airy 

Walden, Frances, B.S.H.E Scottsburg, Va. 

Walden, Gayle, B.M High Point 

Walker, Betty Lou, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem 

Walker, Rebecca, A.B Summerfield 

Wall, Patricia, A.B Burlington 

Wallace, Caroline, B.S.H.E. . w_ Jamesville 

Walton, Jane, A.B Salisbury 

Ward, Louise, A.B Charlotte 

Ward, Margueritte, B.S.S.A Rose Hill 

Watts, Mary Doris, A.B Stanley 

Webb, Ann, B.S.P.E Pinetops 

Weinstock, Gladys, A.B Winston-Salem 

Weinstock, Lorraine, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Weiss, Barbara, A.B Lawrence, N. Y. 

Welch, Carolyn, A.B Greensboro 

Wellons, Evelyn, A.B Selma 

Wells, Violet Mae, A.B Hampstead 

Weltner, Diane, A.B Winston-Salem 



Student List 287 

Westray, Mary, A.B Enfield 

Whitley, Barbara Jean, A.B Asheville 

Whitmire, Rosemary, A.B Asheville 

Whittington, Ella Jean, A.B Millers Creek 

Wiese, Elizabeth, B.S.N Legerwood 

Wilkie, Elizabeth, A.B Forest City 

Williams, Bonnie, A.B East Bend 

Wilson, Carol, A.B West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Wilson, Irece, A.B Waynesville 

Wilson, Mary Ann, A.B Draper 

Wilson, Nona, A.B Polkville 

Wilson, Shirley, A.B Rose Hill 

Wilson, Sylvia, B.S.P.E Greenwich, Conn. 

Winkler, Reba, A.B Lenoir 

Womble, Barbara, A.B Wrightsville Beach 

Wood, Charlane, A.B Kernersville 

Wood, Frances, A.B Hays 

Woolf, Sara, A.B Tyler, Tex. 

Wrenn, Anne, A.B Greensboro 

Wright, Kathryn, A.B Lincolnton 

Yarborough, Jane, A.B Raleigh 

Yeapanis, Betty, B.M Dillon, S. C. 

Yoder, Anne, A.B Lincolnton 

York, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Asheville 

Young, Jean, A.B Winston-Salem 

Young, Joyce 0., A.B Charlotte 

Yow, Valerie, A.B Greensboro 

Ziglar, Nancy, B.S.H.E Lawsonville 



COMMERCIAL STUDENTS 

Adams, Nancy Rocky Mount 

Allen, Patricia Charlotte 

Arrowood, Betty Lou Weaverville 

Austin, Harriet Charlotte 

Austin, Nancy Albemarle 

Auten, Agnes Charlotte 

Auten, Mary Huntersville 

Aycock, Margaret Skillman Warrenton 

Bailey, Patsy Winston-Salem 

Ballard, Ann Polkton 

Barnes, Edith Weldon 

Barringer, Jean Albemarle 



288 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Barton, Reba Ray Greensboro 

Beatty, Joann Charlotte 

Beaver, Carolyn Greensboro 

Beaver, Hilda Hiddenite 

Bell, Catherine Hazelwood 

Benbow, Patricia Winston-Salem 

Bobbitt, Kay Greensboro 

Borders, Jean Greensboro 

Bowen, Norma Mebane 

Bray, Billie Jo Siler City 

Brown, June Reidsville 

Brown, Louise High Point 

Brcwn, Virginia Boonville 

Brummitt, Ann Kittrell 

Buchanan, Sarah Sanford 

Burleson, Hilda Albemarle 

Bush, Mary Helyn Jacksonville 

Butler, Shirley Reidsville 

Byers, Mary Anne Patterson Springs 

Byrd, Wilma Burlington 

Carpenter, Joyce Raleigh 

Carter, Emma Lou Winston-Salem 

Carter, Sylvia Ruffin 

Carver, Joyce Roxbor( 

Casey, Blanche Clinton 

Chandler, Kay Lincolnton 

Chichester, Elsie Littleton 

Chilton, Betty Jean Pilot Mountain 

Cline, Joanne . Mount H0II3 

Cline, Kay Conovei 

Cobb, Nina Lilesvilh 

Coleman, Jeanette Burlingtoi 

Compton, Ann Greensboro 

Connor, Nancy Charlottt 

Constance, Elizabeth Franklin 

Corby, Margaret Greensboro 

Coupland, Dawn Norlina 

Cox, Mayne Rockingham 

Creasman, Peggy North Wilbesboro 

Crisp, Jo Ann Lenoir 

Cross, Frankie Ruffin 

Crouch, Elizabeth Ann Mayodan 

Crowell, Betty Albemarle 

Daniels, Alletta Denton 

Davis, Nina Goldsboro 



Student List 289 

Davis, Sarah Jane Charlotte 

Davis, Yvonne Greensboro 

Dover, Betty Asheville 

Dozier, Doris Raleigh 

Duncan, Patsy New Bern 

Edmundson, Ruth Goldsboro 

Ellington, Nancy Reidsville 

Emory, Darlene Franklinton 

Evans, Margaret . . Greensboro 

Eways, Gullanar Greensboro 

Ezell, Patricia Hazelwood 

Fagg, Jo Ann Winston-Salem 

Fail, Patricia Selma 

Ferree, Ann Winston-Salem 

Freeman, Betty Wake Forest 

Freeman, Carolyn Elkin 

Freeze, Peggy Kannapolis 

Fulk, Joan Pinnacle 

Gardner, Imogene Goldsboro 

Garner, Doris Wilmington 

Giles, Lind Winston-Salem 

Glass, Elizabeth Reidsville 

Godbey, Christine North Wilkesboro 

Goodyear, Sara Tryon 

Gray, Alice Elizabeth City 

Gray, Rebecca Charlotte 

Gregory, Phillis Elizabeth City 

Griffith, Jennie Lee Greensboro 

Guy, Jean Kinston 

Gwyn, Jeanne Mount Airy 

Hall, Mary Ellen Carthage 

Harrell, Georgia Hamilton 

Harris, Raye Garysburg 

Helms, Greta Greensboro 

Henderson, Shirley Stony Point 

Henry, Betty Ellijay 

Henson, Dolores Asheboro 

Hicks, Sallie Gray Greensboro 

Hoffman, Mary Lincolnton 

Holmes, Joanne Fayetteville 

Honeycutt, Jeanne Clinton 

Hood, Nancy Lenoir 



290 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hoover, Patricia North Wilkesboro 

Hopper, Elinor Ann Shelby 

Ingram, Faith Lilesville 

Jackson, Barbara Greensboro 

Jackson, Vera Hendersonville 

Jones, T. Ann Jacksonville 

Jones, Doris Thomasville 

Jones, Nancy Raleigh 

Joyce, Laura Gayle Greensboro 

Kennedy, Marjorie Sanford 

Killian, Jean Conover 

Kindley, Ruth Indian Trail 

Kirkley, Delores Chocowinity 

Langdon, Sue Angier 

Langley, Susan Schwabenton Greensboro 

Lanier, Elaine Greensboro 

Latta, Mary Katherine Greensboro 

Leach, Jane Aberdeen 

Ledford, Mary Franklin 

Lloyd, Priscilla Efland 

Lockman, La Verne Lincolnton 

Long, Shirley Roxboro 

Lynam, Janet Wake Forest 

McCormick, Sara Saint Pauls 

McCurdy, Peggy Greensboro 

McElveen, Barbara Winston- Salem 

McLean, Elizabeth Lumberton 

McMillan, Jerrine Reidsville 

Martin, Madge Saint Pauls 

Mather, Shirley Greensboro 

Matheson, Pearl Stony Point 

Mauney, Sue Concord 

Mayer, Sylvia Greensboro 

Meletiou, Meropi Greensboro 

Metrides, Betty ; Greensboro 

Michael, Bonnie Lexington 

Midyette, Betty Kinston 

Minton, Kay Mayodan 

Mitchell, Alice Greensboro 

Mitchell, Iris Mayodan 

Money, Sylvia Greensboro 



Student List 291 

Moore, Adrienne Smathers Canton 

Moore, Rosalie Mooresville 

Mosinger, Helen Winston- Salem 

Nester, Sarah Mount Airy 

Nichols, Ruth Mount Airy 

Nifong, Nell Jane Morganton 

Odom, Stephnia Mount Olive 

Overman, Frances Charlotte 

Owen, Edna Roseboro 

Palmer, Elsie Waynesville 

Palmer, Tommy Sue Reidsville 

Patterson, Bobbie Asheboro 

Phelps, Carolyn Charlotte 

Phipps, Rebecca McLeansville 

Phoenix, Rebecca Greensboro 

Pittman, Eleanor Ann Lumberton 

Pope, Peggy Cedar Grove 

Poplin, Elizabeth Concord 

Poteat, Nancy Danville, Va. 

Rash, Celia Lenoir 

Reavis, Nancy Henderson 

Redfern, Sue Albemarle 

Rights, Peggy Advance 

Royall, Lois Roaring Gap 

Russell, Tess Greensboro 

Saintsing, Hope Norlina 

Sanders, Frances Pittsboro 

Sauter, Sylvia Fayetteville 

Self, Marlene Morganton 

Shaffner, Gretchen Winston-Salem 

Sherrill, Joan Statesville 

Shoe, Mary Anne Salisbury 

Showfety, Barbara Greensboro 

Shytle, Mary Louise Hendersonville 

Sizemore, Marie Greensboro 

Slate, Suzanne High Point 

Slaughter, Katie Roxboro 

Smith, Anne Winston-Salem 

Smith, Bobbie Jean Norwood 

Smith, Mary Ann Winston-Salem 

Smith, Nancy Carolyn Fayetteville 



292 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Smith, Nell Siler City 

Smith, Sue Albemarle 

Smitherman, Margaret Winston-Salem 

Somers, Elsie Burlington 

Sowers, Jessie Neil Statesville 

Spach, Ann Winston-Salem 

Stallings, Ernestine Harrisburg 

Stanley, Carolyn Jacksonville 

Steele, Frances Bear Poplar 

Steelman, Dorothy Yadkinville 

Suggs, Wanda Burlington 

Summers, Gloria Gibsonville 

Taylor, Beatrice Chocowinity 

Taylor, Sara Ann Greensboro 

Tew, Edna Earle Godwin 

Theiling, Sally Charlotte 

Thomas, Peggy Raleigh 

Thompson, Phyllis Kannapolis 

Tilley, Kathryn Mount Airy 

Torrence, Bettie Davidson 

Trent, Jane Reidsville 

Tucker, Dorlee North Wilkesboro 

Tysinger, Patsy Winston-Salem 

Vaughan, Emmy Lou Bahama 

Vick, Barbara Charlotte 

Vickers, Joan Durham 

Walker, Peggy Joyce Hillsboro 

Warren, Peggy Wilmington 

Watson, Mabel Pinnacle 

Way, Ann Reidsville 

Way, Barbara Asheboro 

Welch, Patricia Mount Airy 

Whitfield, Alma Jean Mount Olive 

Whitley, Barbara Ann Murfreesboro 

Whitt, Betty Lou Winston-Salem 

Whittington, Lena Gray North Wilkesboro 

Wilkinson, Mary Elizabeth Charlotte 

Williams, Jo Ann Winston-Salem 

Williams, Rebecca A Greensboro 

Williford, Patricia Albemarle 

Willis, Lois Morehead City 

Winner, Pearl Carolina Beach 

Workman, Ann Elon College 



Student List 293 

Wright, Barbara Ruffin 

Wright, Martha Siler City 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Anthony, Annie Reidsville 

Berry, Mary Chapman Greensboro 

Bibza, Olga Greensboro 

Brown, Julia Oradell, N. J. 

Buckley, Isabelle Leaksville 

Burgess, Jackson Greensboro 

Chipley, Ann Lela Rocky Mount 

Clarke, Ruth Abbott Greensboro 

Click, Margaret Elkin 

Coleman, Faye Thompson Black Creek 

Day, Savannah Segraves Greensboro 

Ellison, Aleta G Winston-Salem 

Erickson, Louise Kalmia 

Fields, Dorothy Stonville 

Gorton, Arlene Elizabeth Pawtucket, R. I. 

Greenlee, Nancy Charlotte 

Hall, Barbara Durham 

Hazelman, Herbert R * Greensboro 

Hennis, Gail Greensboro 

Hickey, Catherine Perry Greensboro 

James, Lydia Wilson 

Johnston, Jill Oscawana, N. Y. 

Kiger, Iris Rural Hall 

Kindig, Louise Waynesboro, Va. 

Kuykendall, Pauline I Winston-Salem 

Leath, Lucy Home Greensboro 

Levin, Helen Mamber Greensboro 

Lewis, Laura L. W Greensboro 

McComb, Edythe Townsend Hickory 

Mason, Marilyn Brownsburg, Ind. 

Merritt, John Loomis Greensboro 



294 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Orange, James E Greensboro 

Parks, Helen Marie Hornersville, Mo. 

Parramore, Ada Alice Valdosta, Ga. 

Pollard, Ann Carter Winston-Salem 

Porter, Nancy . . Cincinnati, 0. 

Raby, Betty Brown Philadelphia, Pa. 

Saltzsieder, Barbara Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schaper, Monna Glasco, Kans. 

Sherwin, Hilda Greensboro 

Smith, Eugene Taft Greensboro 

Smith, Robert Garnette Greensboro 

Southerland, James Francis Greensboro 

Stevens, Jean Winston-Salem 

Stohlman, Yvonne R Fayetteville 

Teufel, Magdalene R Staunton, Va. 

Toenes, George D Greensboro 

Van Dyke, Virginia Tazewell, Va. 

Voorhis, Anne Chapel Hill 

Willis, Leah T Greensboro 

Womble, Charlotte Mae New Hill 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Adams, Mahlon Hedrick ; . . Greensboro 

Aderhold, Frances Millikan Greensboro 

Anstips, Vilma Greensboro 

AtKisson, Laura Mae Greensboro 

Ball, Ruth Summers Greensboro 

Barker, Gladies Greensboro 

Barrier, Louise Farmer 

Beaman, Lynn Chapin Greensboro 

Boardman, Dorothy Greensboro 

Bullock, Louise Roebuck Greensboro 

Burgess, Judith Livingston Greensboro 

Butler, Frances A Greensboro 

Butt, Angela Greensboro 

Cardwell, Amelia Greensboro 

Cardwell, Christine A Greensboro 



Student List 295 

Cochran, Marian Mollohan Huntersville 

Cutting, Helen F Greensboro 

Davis, Evangeline Guilford College 

Davis, Virginia Louise Greensboro 

Deming, Robina D Greensboro 

Draper, Bernice Greensboro 

Durham, Alberta Rodgers Greensboro 

Dutton, Margaret Ann Greensboro 

Ellis, Pauline T Greensboro 

Folckemer, Alice J Greensboro 

Frye, Opal Greensboro 

Golden, Jane Greensboro 

Good, Frances W Greensboro 

Goodman, Marilyn B Wilmington 

Grigsby, Dorothy Asheville 

Grogan, lone H Greensboro 

Gurley, Alice K Greensboro 

Hall, Rachel Greensboro 

Hamilton, Joan Ann Greensboro 

Hine, Frances Julian Winston-Salem 

Hines, Pearle Chamness Greensboro 

Hornig, Jean Glenn Greensboro 

Hunter, Annie May Henderson 

Huske, Mary Lou Stack Greensboro 

Ishikawa, Yoko Yokohama, Japan 

Lambe, Ronald Nelson Greensboro 

Lane, Margery O'Kelley Greensboro 

Lang, Berta Greensboro 

Leonard, Martha Greensboro 

Lewis, Anne Greensboro 

Lewis, Martha Freed Winston-Salem 

McFalls, Samuel Greensboro 

McLendon, Mary Stuart Greensboro 

Marsh, Helen Terry Greensboro 

Metzger, Estelle Smith Guilford College 

Miller, Meta H Greensboro 

Mims, Helen W Edgefield, S. C. 

Moore, Ramelle Winston-Salem 



296 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Pannill, Florence Greensboro 

Parrish, Barbara Greensboro 

Perryman, Edith Joan Greensboro 

Phelps, Jean Winston-Salem 

Pierce, Virginia May Brooklyn, N. Y- 

Price, Joyce L . Greensboro 

Pritchard, Lois Sawyer Greensboro 

Robinette, Ersley C Greensboro 

Robinson, Susan Carter Asheville 

Sanders, Martha J Greensboro 

Schaeffer, Josephine P Greensboro 

Shaner, Ella Ackiss Greensboro 

Simpson, Betty Davis Greensboro 

Skinner, Peggy Whitakers 

Smith, Catherine Greensboro 

Snider, Florence Lide Greensboro 

Spicer, Kate W Greensboro 

Stimson, Mary Elizabeth Statesville 

Sutherland, Vawter S Greensboro 

Swaringen, Helen Lois High Point 

Talley, Martha Lynn Greensboro 

Taylor, Joan Claire Greensboro 

Taylor, Lois Elon College 

Troxler, Beverly Barrier Greensboro 

Urban, Claire Greensboro 

Venable, Ray Greensboro 

Walker, Ora Lee Scott Burlington 

Walker, Winona Greensboro 

Weinstein, Joan Greensboro 

Westbrook, Mary Council Greensboro 

Wharton, Rose Greensboro 

White, Louise Greensboro 

Wilson, Helen Curry Greensboro 

Wold, Ronnie-Jean Greensboro 

SUMMER SESSION— 1952 

Abernathy, Charlotte Makepeace (Mrs.) Williamston 

Adams, Julia Greensboro 

Adams, Laura Elizabeth Greensboro 



Student List 297 

Adcox, Lacy Barrett (Mr.) Liberty 

Albright, Betsy S. (Mrs.) Whitsett 

Albright, Fred Walter Whitsett 

Aldridge, Effie Lou Cheek (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Alexander, Mrs. Chester Greensboro 

Allen, Hilda Brady (Mrs.) Liberty 

Alligood, Edna Carolyn Durham 

Allison, Bette Jean Asheville 

Anderson, Alease Perdue (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Anderson, Mary Lois Bennettsville, S. C. 

Anderson, Maude Greensboro 

Andrew, Mitchel C Greensboro 

Anthony, Catherine Belle Yadkinville 

Anthony, Harriette Holton Shelby 

Applebaum, Herbert Daniel New York, N. Y. 

Arrington, Patricia Ann Southport 

Ashley, Dorothie Steele (Mrs.) Wilmington 

Askew, Virginia Winston-Salem 

Aulbert, Jacqueline (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Austin, Anne Minton (Mrs.) Lewiston 

Austin, Betty Ruth Boone 

Austin, Mary Jane Boone 

Austin, Sarah Monroe 

Averett, Rena Williams Oxford 

Baird, Joan Statesville 

Baker, Betty Jackson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Baldecchi, Guy Alfred Fair Lawn, N. J. 

Bales, Catherine McCracken (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Ballard, Lacy Henry (Mr.) Randleman 

Ballinger, Nancy Carolyn Guilford College 

Banks, Margaret Carol Trenton 

Barbour, Charles Thomas Wesfield 

Barbour, Hazel Henrietta (Mrs.) Hamptonville 

Barbour, Rachel Lea Benson 

Barefoot, Lois Erlene Benson 

Barker, Carolyn Ann Ringgold, Va. 

Barker, Gladies Greensboro 

Barkley, Margaret Huffman (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Barnard, Margaret Ann Asheboro 

Barrett, Dorothy Burlington 

Barringer, Jane Helms (Mrs.) Concord 

Barton, Gerald John Riverdale, Bronx, N. Y. 

Barton, Paul Robert Charlotte 

Bassett, John Edwin, Jr Bassett, Va. 

Bates, Charles D Greensboro 



298 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Bauserman, Charles W., Jr Greensboro 

Bazzle, Edward Franklin Salemburg 

Beall, Robert Sedgefield 

Beamon, Elizabeth Weir (Mrs.) High Point 

Beavers, Lydia Etta Greensboro 

Belton, June Carolyn Mount Airy 

Benbow, Willow Way Oak Ridge 

Benton, Mary E Greensboro 

Best, William A Stokesdale 

Bibza, Olga Maria Duquesne, Pa. 

Biggs, Ollie Ann Red Springs 

Bill, Margaret Elizabeth Hendersonville 

Billings, Roscoe Lake, Jr Sparta 

Bishop, Theresa Greensboro 

Bivins, Frances Sydney Scott (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Blackwell, Billy Adron (Mr.) Graham 

Blackwell, Kathleen Adkins (Mrs.) Pine Hall 

Blair, Margaret Louise Charlotte 

Blanks, Joseph Younger Elon College 

Blue, Doris Greensboro 

Bobbitt, Norman Edward Durham 

Boggs, Allie R. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Boggs, Rita Greensboro 

Bolen, Arnold Lee Greensboro 

Bolen, Mabel Smith (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Bolick, Ernest Bernard Southmont 

Bondanella, Dorothy McKenzie (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Boone, Helen Humnes (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Boose, Glenn Oscar Mocksville 

Booth, Patricia Greensboro 

Bostick, Helen Worth Greensboro 

Bowden, Frances Arnold Milledgeville, Ga. 

Bowen, Emily R Washington 

Bowen, Grace R Greensboro 

Bowers, Lettie Green (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Bowers, Lucille Lexington 

Boyce, Glendora Lockhart Ansonville 

Boyd, Mary Frances Stovall 

Bradley, Ina Lou Greensboro 

Brande, Gilmer Collins (Mr.) Madison 

Brannock, Edith Ruth Elon College 

Bransford, Anne Louise Greensboro 

Branson, Merton H. (Mr.) Asheboro 

Bray, Avis Carol Boonville 

Bray, Margaret Myers (Mrs.) Coinjock 

Brewer, Beulah (Mrs.) Bennett 



Student List 299 

Bright, Miriam Tabitha Virginia Beach, Va. 

Britt, Mary Ann High Point 

Broadwell, Maitland Saint Pauls 

Brock, Sarah Lee Greensboro 

Brooks, Betty Ann Greensboro 

Brooks, Beulah Wood (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Brower, Sara Staley (Mrs.) Liberty 

Brown, Janie Bryson (Mrs.) Cullowhee 

Brown, June Shirley (Mrs.) Hickory 

Brown, Mary Sue Clark (Mrs.) Efigh Point 

Bryant, Barbara Jane Winston-Salem 

Bryant, Betsy Jane High Point 

Buie, Anne Eloise Landis 

Bullard, Hilda Fayetteville 

Bullard, James D Asheboro 

Bullock, Jeanie Greensboro 

Bullock, Ruby Wadesboro 

Buls, Harold Herman (Mr.) Greensboro 

Burch, Margaret Bradley Wadesboro 

Burdette, Margaret Ruth Burlington 

Burnette, Jack Wertz Evansville, Ind. 

Burns, Donna Elizabeth High Point 

Burns, Mary Elizabeth Ansonville 

Burns, Theodore Warren Elon College 

Burr, Susan Greensboro 

Burt, Eleanor Wade Bruton (Mrs.) Biscoe 

Butler, Mary Griffin (Mrs.) Elon College 

Byrd, Charles Reuben Greenville, S. C. 

Caine, Mary Anita Greensboro 

Galloway, James Leonard Concord 

Campbell, Betty Lorene Denton 

Campbell, Mary Milton Newton 

Carambat, Glenn McDougald (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Carder, Mrs. D. V Clinton 

Carmichael, Duncan D Kingsport, Tenn. 

Carr, Doris B. C. (Mrs.) Danville, Va. 

Carr, Ada Frances Godwin 

Carter, Louise Dean (Mrs.) Guilford 

Caruso, Geraldine Kelley (Mrs.) Tabor City 

Caruso, Silvio Wilson Tabor City 

Cash, Mary Belle Winston-Salem 

Cashwell, Linda Greensboro 

Cates, Margaret Merle Greensboro 

Gates, Winifred Ann Greensboro 

Cauble, Martha Fisher (Mrs.) Granite Quarry 



300 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Caudill, Estelle Williams (Mrs.) Elkin 

Caudill, Wayne Jack Winston-Salem 

Caudle, Ruth Mae Yadkinville 

Causey, Belle Eloise Liberty 

Causey, Dorothy Louise Greensboro 

Cavedo, Robert Page Kernersville 

Caveness, Kittie Jones (Mrs.) Franklinville 

Chadwick, Jo Anne Winston-Salem 

Chamberlain, Gladys C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Chappell, Elizabeth Pasco Elizabeth City 

Charles, Pauline Hyatt (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Cheek, Audrey Jane Baltimore, Md. 

Cheek, Dorothy M. McPherson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Childers, Charles Rex Thomasville 

Childress, Miriam McDonald (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Chilton, Robert E Clemmons 

Choate, Emma Rachel Charlotte 

Choate, Janie James Pineville 

Church, Jewel Graham (Mrs.) Old Fort 

Clapp, Ann Broughton (Mrs.) Rosman 

Clark, Frank Leo Clemmons 

Clark, Gwendolyn Ruth Greensboro 

Clark, Mary Lou Reidsville 

Clark, Mary Underwood (Mrs.) Bonlee 

Clark, Sara Ann Reidsville 

Clifton, Ellen Faison 

Coats, Joycelyn Louise Smithfield 

Coble, Annie Tucker Greensboro 

Coggins, James Rayford High Point 

Cohen, Janet Doris Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cohill, Mary Agnes Browne (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Cole, Anne Howard CTreensboro 

Coleman, Faye Thompson (Mrs.) Black Creek 

Collier, June Carol Pikeville 

Collier, Jo Ann Pikeville 

Collins, Macie Richardson Gastonia 

Coltrane, Virginia Catherine Mount Airy 

Cook, Janet Corina Goldsboro 

Cooley, Millicent Davis , Asheville 

Copeland, Alice Freeman Ahoskie 

Cordova, Florence Wemple (Mrs.) Morehead City 

Cornelius, Edwin Parker Charlotte 

Cornelius, Joan Greensboro 

Cornwell, Mary Ashbrook (Mrs.) Shelby 

Correll, Jo Ann Concord 

Covington, Betty Lou Whitsett 



Student List 301 

Covington, Merie Colson (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Craig, Gay Arnold (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Cromartie, Anne N. (Mrs.) Garland 

Crookshank, Robert R Winston-Salem 

Cross, Ailsie Mayo Charlotte 

Crowell, Leroy Walker Winston-Salem 

Crumpler, Thelma Pridgen (Mrs.) Hope Mills 

Cude, Wendell Holmes Greensboro 

Currie, Flora Elizabeth Maxton 

Custer, Anna Loux (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Dail, Faye Agnes Edenton 

Dalla Pozza, Ada Braswell (Mrs.) Wadesboro 

Dandenburg, William P Winston-Salem 

Daughtridge, Nellie Emily Portsmouth, Va. 

Daves, Betty Jean ... Lincolnton 

Davis, Angela Greensboro 

Davis, Jacqueline Anne Mount Olive 

Davis, Marguerite Louise Lexington 

Davis, Ruth Johnston (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Day, Savannah S. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Deal, Florence H. Miller (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Dean, Anita Greensboro 

Dean, Bobbie Wolfe (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Deaton, Joseph H Elon College 

DeHart, Judith Ray Draper 

Denny, Rose Bryant (Mrs.) Julian 

Deskins, Julia E Greensboro 

Dial, Helen (Mrs.) Rural Hall 

Dilday, Thelma Earley Ahoskie 

Dillard, Bettye Jo Willard 

Dinkins, Ruth Blair (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Dirickson, Rebekah Hunter Salisbury, Md. 

Dixon, Marian H New Hanover 

Dobbins, Ruth Logan Spring Lake 

Dobson, Cornelia Forest City 

Dockery, Luther Sam High Point 

Doub, Mildred E Pfafftown 

Dowdy, Gladys Foster (Mrs.) Jamestown 

Dowtin, Mary Lexington 

Drewry, Viola James (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Driver, Mary Lucinda Raleigh 

Duncan, Clarice Lewis (Mrs.) Siler City 

Dunn, Philip Greensboro 

Dyar, Virginia C. (Mrs.) High Point 

Dye, Lelia Cobb (Mrs.) Reidsville 



302 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Easterling, Lois Kathryn Greensboro 

Eatman, Carol Greensboro 

Eaton, Sylvia Frances Burlington 

Edmundson, Barbara Jean Pikeville 

Edwards, Anna Bennett Greensboro 

Edwards, Burwell Patterson (Mrs.) High Point 

Edwards, Dorothy Baldwin (Mrs.) Fletcher 

Edwards, Joan Greensboro 

Edwards, Jolene Weathers (Mrs.) Raleigh 

Eller, Laura Nan Lansing 

Eller, Mary Elizabeth Spencer 

Eller, Rosaline Stallings (Mrs.) Hyattsville, Md. 

Elliott, Donnie Greensboro 

Ellis, Pauline T. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Elrick, Helen Elaine Baltimore, Md. 

Elrick, Joan Lucile Baltimore, Md. 

Embler, Kathleen Kernersville 

English, Alma Willard 

Ervin, Billie Jo Shelby 

Evans, Betty Wheeler Maxton 

Evans, Frances Bernice Asheville 

Everett, Mrs. M. S Raleigh 

Fairfax, Florence Mae Laurinburg 

Farlow, Bouneva French Sophia 

Farris, Fannie Cherryville 

Faust, Nancy Lou • • • • Greensboro 

Feezor, Theresa Lexington 

Ferebee, Dorothy Elizabeth Windsor 

Ferguson, Mary Walker (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Ferree, Vera Mae High Point 

Festa, Salvatore Antonio Greensboro 

Fields, Dorothy Mae Carthage 

Fields, Ethel Pleasant Garden 

Fields, May Pleasant Garden 

Finch, Mary Fisher Zebulon 

Fink, Dwight A Crossnore 

Fishel, Margaret Emma Vaughan 

Fitts, Rivers Ivie (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Fleming, Ina Sue Boonville 

Fleming, Nancy Poe Grimesland 

Fletcher, John Milton Winston-Salem 

Flynn, Emma Lee (Mrs.) High Point 

Folk, Mabel Clay (Mrs.) High Point 

Fondren, Doris Greensboro 

Ford, Anne Scott Charlotte 



Student List 303 

Fox, Lawrence Albert Winston-Salem 

Fox, Nancy Chatham, Va. 

Frank, Sarah (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Frazier, Mary Rebecca Greensboro 

Freas, Nina Bryan (Mrs.) Walnut Cove 

Freeman, Alice Greensboro 

Freeman, Martin C Stokesdale 

Freeze, Margaret Montgomery (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Frye, Doris Allen (Mrs.) Stoneville 

Fulk, George Allen . Pilot Mountain 

Fuller, Jane Secrest Monroe 

Fuller, Joan Marie Greensboro 

Fuller, Mildred Pisgah Forest 

Fulp, Blanche Ingram (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Fulton, Robert William Leaksville 

Gabriel, Norma Smith North Wilkesboro 

Gafford, Elma H. (Mrs.) Salisbury 

Gaines, Shirley Ann Jamesville 

Gamble, Mary Pinnix (Mrs.) Summerfield 

Gantt, Doris Dolores Mt. Holly 

Garrison, Marie McCulloch (Mrs.) Burlington 

Gaston, Minnie Murchison (Mrs.) Salisbury 

Gatling, Thelma Ross (Mrs.) Madison 

Gaulden, Terry-Odiene Greensboro 

Gaylord, Tommie Martin (Mr.) Reidsville 

Gibbs, Audrey Lee Gastonia 

Gibson, Everett Thomas Winston-Salem 

Gibson, Gladys Lucille Winston-Salem 

Gilbert, Lula May Greensboro 

Gilbert, Nancy Barbara Absecon, N. J. 

Gillespie, Ralph Thomas Reidsville 

Ginnings, Gerald Keith Greensboro 

Gold, Neil Bernard Raleigh 

Gooch, DeWitt John Greensboro 

Good, Frances W. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Goode, Eugenia Coltrane (Mrs.) Jamestown 

Gordner, Ida Caroline Salisbury 

Gordon, Nonie Josephine Pilot Mountain 

Gradeck, Viola R New Haven, Conn. 

Grant, Lena Evelyn Garysburg 

Grant, Robert Greensboro 

Gravely, Nancy Carolyn Brevard 

Gravely, Jean Marie Brevard 

Gray, Emily Hinshaw (Mrs.) Randleman 

Gray, Flora E. Phillips (Mrs.) , Erwin 



304 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Gray, Michele Greensboro 

Gray, Ruby Alice Randleman 

Gray, Susan Rose (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Graybeal, Nancy West Jefferson 

Green, Virginia Alma .-» Sumter, S. C. 

Greenberg, Carole Marilyn . Greensboro 

Greene, Haven Allen Greensboro 

Greene, Alma Louise Parkersburg 

Greene, June Carol Shelby 

Greene, Kenneth David High Point 

Greer, Margaret P. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Grier, Gertrude Anne Charlotte 

Griffin, Mary Alice Williamston 

Griffin, Billy Joe Marshville 

Griffin, David Julian Reidsville 

Griffin, Etholinda Reidsville 

Griffin, Herman R Rural Hall 

Grissom, Annie Margaret Louisburg 

Grogan, Lewis Robert Reidsville 

Grogan, Mozelle Culler (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Grogan, William King, Jr Kernersville 

Grubbs, Margaret Morton (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Gryder, Barbara Jean Greensboro 

Gulliver, Charlotte Greensboro 

Haacke, Ella Marta Santiago, Chile 

Haacke, Ruth Maria Santiago, Chile 

Haley, Sue (Mrs.) Elon College 

Hall, Barbara Anne Durham 

Hall, Elizabeth Thomas (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Hall, Mary Ethyl Iva, S. C. 

Hall, Mary Teresa Swainsboro, Ga. 

Hall, Minnie Morris (Mrs.) Lexington 

Ham, Louise Anzalette Greensboro 

Hamer, Bertha Del Rockingham 

Handy, Frances Reidsville 

Harder, Mary Josephine Greensboro 

Hardison, Sallie McGhee (Mrs.) Portsmouth, Va. 

Harman, Cornelia Knight (Mrs.) Guilford College 

Harmon, Olivia Ann Raleigh 

Harrell, Betty Jo Wilson 

Harrell, Lorene Elizabeth ; . . . Greensboro 

Harrell, Quita Joy Clinton 

Harrelson, Patricia Anne Charlotte 

Harrelson, Rilma Maude Cherryville 

Harris, Beatrice Gresham (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 



Student List 305 

Harris, Jean Carolyn Carthage 

Harris, Mary Alice Norwood 

Harris, Nella Gamble Statesville 

Harris, William C, Jr South Orange, N. J. 

Harrison, Clara Page (Mrs.) High Point 

Harrison, Harold H Asheboro 

Hartley, Charles Bryce Sophia 

Harutunian, Anoush Greensboro 

Hawkins, Fred Elon College 

Hawkins, Warren G Asheboro 

Hayes, Gaynell Winston-Salem 

Haynes, Jeter L Summerfield 

Haynes, Virginia Greensboro 

Hayworth, Dovie Mae High Point 

Hazard, Thelma Lois Haw River 

Hazelman, Herbert R Greensboro 

Hedrick, Nancy Greensboro 

Heinsberger, Catherine Patricia Lumeberton 

Henry, Jean Moseley Kinston 

Hensley, Ila Lazelle Thomasville 

Herford, William Henry Greensboro 

Herring, Sarah Christine Goldsboro 

Hiatt, Pauline Almedia Thomasville 

Hill, Carolyn Earle Greensboro 

Hill, Mary Flayree Union Mills 

Hill, Rebecca Royall (Mrs.) Wake Forest 

Hilleman, Jane Manett Rochester, N. Y. 

Hine, Barbara Winston-Salem 

Hinnant, Frances Louise Durham 

Hinshaw, Elisabeth W. (Mrs.) Siler City 

Hobbs, Elizabeth Helen Walstonburg 

Hockett, Mary Alice Pleasant Garden 

Hockett, Ruth Reynolds (Mrs.) Pleasant Garden 

Hodges, Eva Miriam Greenville 

Hodges, Naomi Davey (Mrs.) Yanceyville 

Holcomb, James Walter Pilot Mountain 

Holcombe, Gladys Louise Spartanburg, S. C. 

Holleman, John Spencer Winston-Salem 

Hollingsworth, David T Fayetteville 

Holmes, James Lewis, Jr Reidsville 

Holmes, Sidney (Miss) Greensboro 

Holt, Helen Hickey (Mrs.) Burlington 

Homewood, Flora Shales (Mrs.) Marion 

Hook, Kenneth Boyd Reidsville 

Hooper, Ruth Saunders (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Hopkins, Mirian V Brown Summit 



306 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Hooper, Alpha Gettys (Mrs.) Shelby 

Home, Peggy Lee * Charlotte 

Howie, Naomi Thomasville 

Hudson, Alma Brown (Mrs.) Granite Quarry 

Hudson, Eleanor C. (Mrs.) Jacksonville 

Hudson, Joan Magdallen Greensboro 

Huffine, Ruth Delphine Cogwell (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hufham, Betty Clinton 

Hunt, Ralph Mebane Kernersville 

Hunter, Avery Winfield Wentworth 

Hunter, Dorothy Geraldine McKenzie (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Hunter, Mary Alford (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hunter, Thomas E Winston-Salem 

Huss, Joyce Evelyn Thomasville 

Hutchins, Helen Yadkinville 

Hutchins, Louise Gertrude Belews Creek 

Hutchinson, Verlin Winston-Salem 

Hutto, Ruby Greensboro 

Ingold, Jean Keeter Fayetteville 

Ingram, Lura Evadeane Princeton 

Ingram, Robert Lee, Jr High Point 

Irvin, Charles Watson, Jr Greensboro 

Isley, Lalah Perkins Greensboro 

Isley, Lou Heritage Siler City 

Ison, Tirzah Messick Charlotte 

Ivie, Kathleen Leaksville 

Jackson, Marian Walker Charlotte 

Jarvis, Etta Eugenia Greensboro 

Jenkins, Bertha H. (Mrs.) Roanoke Rapids 

Jennings, Margaret W. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Jennings, Rose L. (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Jochum, James Peter Winston-Salem 

Johnson, Lucy Adelaide Henderson 

Johnson, Elizabeth Lewis (Mrs.) Bolivia 

Johnson, Ida Jane Huntersville 

Johnson, Mary Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Johnson, Virginia W. (Mrs.) High Point 

Johnston, L. Eugene Winston-Salem 

Jolliff , Marietta Belvidere 

Jones, Elizabeth Harriette Franklin 

Jones, Margaret Swann (Mrs.) Madison 

Jones, Mary McLaurin (Mrs.) Laurinburg 

Jones, Robert Payne Winston-Salem 

Jones, Ruth Emerson Charlotte 



Student List 307 

Jordan, Lucille Miller (Mrs.) Rolesville 

Jordan, Martha Lancaster 

Joyce, Walter C Winston-Salem 

Justice, Marjorie Louise Trent (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Kanter, Jean Lou Kinston 

Kaplan, Miriam Durham 

Kapp, Elizabeth Bynum Winston-Salem 

Kasman, Walter Raleigh 

Katsikas, Georgia Greensboro 

Kearney, Cora Anne Greensboro 

Kearney, Mary Greensboro 

Kearns, Barbara Scott Greensboro 

Kearns, Mary Badgett (Mrs.) High Point 

Keck, Fay Maxine Burlington 

Keever, Mary Anne Charlotte 

Keith, Carole Marion Greensboro 

Keller, Alice W Cerro Gordo 

Kelley, Mary Joe Winston-Salem 

Kelly, Marjorie N. Simpson (Mrs.) Thomasville 

Kennedy, Daisy Hunter (Mrs.) Clinton 

Kent, Elizabeth Lane Kingsport, Tenn. 

Kernodle, Mary Winifred Elon College 

Ketner, Helen Carol Hamlet 

Kilgore, Janie W Charlotte 

Killebrew, Kathleen A. (Mrs.) High Point 

Kimmelstiel, Marion Charlotte 

Kimrey, Ann Wright Clinton 

King, Elaine Saunders (Mrs.) Reidsville 

King, Mrs. Walter W Greensboro 

Kirby, Audrey Smith (Mrs.) King 

Kirkpatrick, Milo Orton, Jr Charlotte 

Kissam, Barbara Ivey Metze (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Kjosnes, Unni Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Kleber, Jeanne Marolyn Durham 

Kluttz, Dorothy Greensboro 

Kluttz, Marjorie Ann Greensboro 

Kluttz, Sallie Neale Albemarle 

Knott, Louise Sides (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Koenig, Sue Burnsville 

Koestline, Sarah Katherine Lewis (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Koster, Katherine Henrietta Morganton 

Kunze, Minerva Jane Leaksville 

Kuykendall, Mary Helen Madison 

Lain, Ruth Irene High Point 

Lambe, Ronald Nelson Greensboro 



308 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Lanier Ralph Odell Lexington 

Lassiter, Glenna Floyd (Mrs.) Randleman 

Lassiter, Louie Thomas Raleigh 

Lattimore, Marjorie Apple (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Laughlin, Sarah V Marion 

Lawing, Estelle Cherry (Mrs.) High Point 

Lawrence, Ruth Way Greensboro 

Layman, Claude Emerson Roanoke, Va. 

Leary, Gertrude Jones (Mrs.) Greensboro 

LeBauer, Sophie (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lee, Joyce Daisy Greensboro 

Leiby, Edith Mary Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Leigh, Shandy Rockingham 

Lennon, Dorothy McDougald (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Leonard, Hope Greensboro 

Leonard, Jacqueline Cameron (Mrs.) Lexington 

Leonard, Katharine Dennis Greensboro 

Leonard, Marjorie G. (Mrs.) Louisburg 

Leonard, Martha Greensboro 

Leonard, Percy Greensboro 

Leonard, Alice Susan Greensboro 

Leonard, Theodore Pleasant Lexington 

Leonard, Vera Louise Greensboro 

Levine, Susan Greensboro 

Lewis, Taft Jonas (Mrs.) Lexington 

Liddle, Elizabeth Ann Greensboro 

Limehouse, Katherine Grace Summerville, S. C. 

Lippard, Cora Mabel Salisbury 

Litch, Melvin, Jr Greensboro 

Livengood, Esther Nancy Clapp (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Livingstone, Edna Gardner (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Lloyd, Harold Eugene Winston-Salem 

Loftin, Bill Mt. Holly 

Loftis, Christine McLeansville 

Logan, Eva Beatrice Winston-Salem 

Long, Hortense Duncan (Mrs.) Yanceyville 

Long, Louise Leaksville 

Long, Virginia Newman (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lovingood, Glade Charles Greensboro 

Lovings, Lewis Edward Greensboro 

Lowmiller, Barbara Unionville, Conn. 

Lowry, Lucille O. (Mrs.) Pembroke 

Luffman, Jean Rachel State Road 

Lupton, Frances Wilkinson Belhaven 

Luther, Elizabeth Murphrey (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Lytle, Helen Ruth Greensboro 



Student List 309 

McAdams, J. Richard Burlington 

McArthur, Ann Claire Wakulla 

McBee, Pearl Spruce Pine 

McCauley, Larry Broman Burlington 

McClenny, David F Liberty 

McColl, Louise Morrison (Mrs.) Thomasville 

McComb, Edythe Townsend (Mrs.) Hickory 

McConnell, Amanda Lee Greensboro 

McCoy, Minnie Elizabeth Charlotte 

McCraken, Dorothy Mease (Mrs.) Clyde 

McCraw, Doris Greensboro 

McCraw, Dorothy Shaw Clio, S. C. 

McDonald, Elizabeth Berniece Rockingham 

McDonald, Johnny Dick Greensboro 

McDonald, Mary Louise Carthage 

McDonald, Monnie Lillington 

McDuffie, Pauline Biltmore 

McElveen, William Henry Winston-Salem 

McFarland, Virginia Lee Goldsboro 

McGlaughon, Charlotte Winston-Salem 

Mclntyre, Flora Belle Maxton 

Mclntyre, Leta W Clio, S. C. 

McKellar, Albertine P. (Mrs.) Rowland 

McKellar, Susie M. Rowland 

McKinney, Mildred Bakersville 

McLaughlin, Mary Rosamond (Mrs.) Reidsville 

McLean, Mrs. Dickson Lumberton 

McLeod, Emmalen Greenville, S. C. 

McLeod, Martha M Olivia 

McMahan, Patricia Greensboro 

McQueen, Virginia Murphy Fayetteville 

Mabe, Lillian Chandler (Mrs.) Prospect Hill 

Macdonald, Sara Lillian Greensboro 

Madison, Helen Williams (Mrs.) Raleigh 

Malone, Tommie Evelyn Statesville 

Manchester, Gay Grant (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Manzi, Claude A Burlington 

Marley, Margaret Elizabeth fiign Point 

Marsh, Wilhelmina R. (Mrs.) Lexington 

Martin, Emma A. (Mrs.) Ahoskie 

Martin, Jeanne T Greensboro 

Martin, Mary E Raleigh 

Martinelli, Eloise Hodges (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Marshburn, Christine W Greensboro 

Masters, Billie Irene Henderson 



310 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Mateer, Marilyn Greensboro 

Matthews, Louise Greensboro 

Matthews, Lydia P. (Mrs.) Pilot Mountain 

Matthews, Rudolph Bruce East Bend 

Matthews, Troy Alfred East Bend 

Mauney, Elizabeth Ann Newton 

Mauney, Pauline Kings Mountain 

Mayberry, Elizabeth Hinshaw (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Mayer, Robert Alfred Winston-Salem 

Mayhew, Jessie William, Jr Gretna, Va. 

Mayo, Lucille T. (Mrs.) Greenville 

Mayo, Sophia Jarman (Mrs.) Burlington 

Mecum, Jennie Walkertown 

Medlin, Helen Peden (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Melchor, Helen (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Mellon, Harriett Eugenia Stony Point 

Mendenhall, Delmas Vermel Lewisville 

Merriman, Lloyd Oak Ridge 

Merritt, John Loomis Greensboro 

Merritt, Ruth Willard Lexington 

Michael, Richard Edward High Point 

Miller, Myrtle Iris Mt. Airy 

Miller Pauline Ethelda High Point 

Mills, Fred A High Point 

Mitchell, Betty Greensboro 

Mock, Harry Z Lexington 

Money, Charles Brodie Yadkinville 

Montague, Rowena Oxford 

Montgomery, James Curtis Sadler 

Moody, Paul Hutson, Jr Greensboro 

Moore, Betty Reidsville 

Moore, Oneita Emogene Elon College 

Moore, Norma Geddie Matthews 

Moose, L. Marie Reidsville 

Morgan, Harvey E Greensboro 

Morris, Addie Rhem Banks (Mrs.) Salisbury 

Morrison, Margaret Lucille Statesville 

Morse, Mrs. J. W., Jr Rockingham 

Moser, Anthony Greensboro 

Moser, Sadie Mull (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Mourane, Joseph Harley High Point 

Muelenaer, Andre Albert Winston-Salem 

Musnig, Vivian Ruth Kernersville 

Myers, Jerry Albert Kannapolis 

Myers, Minerva Lucina Heilig (Mrs.) Thomasville 



Student List 311 

Nash, Unity High Point 

Needham, Jean Hardin Pilot Mountain 

Nicholson, Willie Edna Thomasville 

Norman, Oma S. (Mrs.) Dobson 

Norris, Nancy Gene Holliston, Mass. 

Nostrandt, Jeanne Rolfe Danville, Va. 

Oaks, Maude Ratledge (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Ogilvie, Sally Ann Providence, R. I. 

Okey, Josephine Y Graham 

Oliver, Kathryn Lenora Fairmont 

Orange, James E Louisburg 

Orrell, Mildred Adeline Winston-Salem 

Osborne, Mae Comer Morganton 

Ownbey, Hope Greensboro 

Page, Audrey May (Mrs.) Kings Mountain 

Page, Elizabeth Nanney (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Paige, Lawrence E Thomasville 

Painter, Kathleen S. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Palmer, Abraham Enloe High Point 

Palmer, Mary Lacy Gulf 

Parker, Annette Clinton 

Parker, Eugenia DeLaney (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Parker, Joan Fuller Oxford 

Parker, Mrs. L. K Wilmington 

Parker, Mollie Carraway Winston-Salem 

Parker, Thomas Ralph Robbins 

Parks, Dennis R., Jr High Point 

Parks, Lillian Louise Charlotte 

Parks, Rebecca Darnell (Mrs.) Walnut Cove 

Parnell, Myrtie Pikeville 

Parry, Pearl Lillian Windsor 

Paschal, Nancy Siler City 

Patterson, Nell Arlene Steelman (Mrs.) Pilot Mountain 

Paul, Mary-Frazier Beaufort 

Peck, Irene Taylor Shelby 

Pegram, Dorothy Ray Greensboro 

Pegram, Herbert V Summerfield 

Pennekamp, Arnold Charles Henry Greensboro 

Penner, Vera B. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Perrin, Marian B. (Mrs.) Rochester, N. Y. 

Perry, Stella Price (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Peters, Elbert, L., Jr Reidsville 

Peters, Ruth Hase (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Peterson, Mary Henri Robinson (Mrs.) Greensboro 



312 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Petree, Ruth Kathleen Germanton 

Phelps, Jean Carol Winston-Salem 

Phelps, Ruth Harrell (Mrs.) Franklin, Va. 

Phillips, Alma Tyndall (Mrs.) Trenton 

Phillips, Jan Greensboro 

Phillips, Judy Greensboro 

Phillips, Wayne Elmer Bennett 

Pierce, Doris Greensboro 

Pike, Carter Ingle High Point 

Pinnix, Marie Yadkinville 

Ploch, Jordan Charles Raleigh 

Poats, Elaine Freeman (Mrs.) Elkin 

Ponder, Carolyn Tweed (Mrs.) Walnut 

Poole, Jessie Allen (Mrs.) Ellerbe 

Pope, Harold James Reidsville 

Pope, Susan Greensboro 

Porter, Ivil L. (Mr.) Walnut Cove 

Porter, Mae Allison (Mrs.) Kelly 

Porter, Mary E. (Mrs.) Clinton 

Porter, Nancy Ann Cincinnati, Ohio 

Powell, Margaret Lee Corapeake 

Powers, Calvin Edison Bennett 

Price, Mrs. C. L Yanceyville 

Prichard, Pearl Hiddenite 

Prongay, Margaret Edith Winston-Salei 

Purgason, Clyde W Walnut Cove 

Quinn, Aaron B Greensboro 

Rabil, Mary Louise Weldon 

Raiford, William Patrick, Jr Greensboro 

Rankin, Lucy McCargo (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Rankin, Mary Frances Greensboro 

Rast, Anne Mays Dillon, S. C. 

Ratterree, Margaret Elder Kings Mountain 

Ray, Clarence Elbert Haw Rivei 

Ray, Evan R Winston-Salei 

Raynor, Violet Marie Maple Hill 

Redwine, Jane Albemarh 

Reece, Kelsie Nixson (Mrs.) Reidsvilh 

Reeves, Lora Lea Fayetteville 

Reid, Anne Phipps (Mrs.) Pilot Mountain 

Reid, Elizabeth Winnabow 

Reid, Mildred Horton (Mrs.) Rutherfordton 

Reins, Irene Winston-Salem 

Reynolds, Doreen Davis (Mrs.) Franklin ville 



Student List 313 

Reynolds, Mrs. W. D Lumberton 

Ridenhour, Lester Ray Burlington 

Ridenhour, Mary Lorene Salisbury 

Robbins, Ruth W. (Mrs.) Windsor 

Roberts, Ida H. (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Roberts, Jean Willow Springs 

Roberts, Marion Patricia Greenville, S. C. 

Robinette, Ersley C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Robinson, Gwendolyn Cherryville 

Robinson, Harriet Elizabeth Kingsport, Tenn. 

Robinson, Richard Elliott Winston-Salem 

Roddey, Carrie Winston-Salem 

Rogers, Sandra Greensboro 

Rose, Elna Connelly (Mrs.) Hanes 

Rosenfeld, Robert Stanley Raleigh 

Rothchild, Barbara (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Rowley, Elmer LeRoy Winston-Salem 

Royall, Rozelle R Clinton 

Royster, Lillie Beatrice Leaksville 

Rutberg, Irving Robert New York, N. Y. 

Rutberg, Michael Arthur New York, N. Y. 

Sadler, Benjamin Greensboro 

Sanderlin, Elizabeth P. (Mrs.) Shawboro 

Sasser, Mary Wilkerson Wilson 

Saunders, Betty Ann Sanford 

Saunders, Perdita Meryl Reidsville 

Scarborough, Ruth Greensboro 

Schacht, Walter E., Jr Wilmington, Mass. 

Schuster, Douglas M New York, N. Y. 

Seawell, Mildred Cross Charlotte 

Seelinger, Dearl Richard Burlington 

Sellers, Edith Elizabeth Greensboro 

Settle, Culos Marion Winston-Salem 

Settle, Ella Ruth (Mrs.) Ronda 

Sexton, Laura Zebulon 

Shaffner, Josephine W. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Shamburger, Pearl Gordon (Mrs.) Star 

Sharp, Emiline G. (Mrs.) Madison 

Sharpe, Charles Robert Greensboro 

Sheets, Eugenia Lanier (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Sheets, Betty Jean Fairview 

Shelton, Martha H. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Shelton, Viola Hoots (Mrs.) Henderson ville 

Sheppard, Izoria Toy Hanes 

Sherrill, Mariann Franklin 



314 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Sherrill, Patsy Alyce Fayetteville 

Shockey, Mary Pleasants (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Shore, Margaret Anne Yadkinville 

Shore, Mildred E. Beasley (Mrs.) King 

Shotwell, Peggy Ann Henderson 

Shuford, Valeria Jackson (Mrs.) Mt. Airy 

Sides, Laura Thornton (Mrs.) East Spencer 

Siebert, Florence G. (Mrs.) Leaksville 

Sikes, Mary A. Williamson (Mrs.) Albemarle 

Siler, Ivan Leon Greensboro 

Silver, Don Jerome High Point 

Sink, Peggy Greensboro 

Sisk, Lorie Remelle (Mrs.) Lexington 

Slate, Julia F. (Mrs.) Spencer 

Slate, Rebecca Ellen Leaksville 

Smathers, Vance A Greensboro 

Smiley, Shirley Spartanburg, S. C. 

Smith, Bertram Taft Greensboro 

Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 



Betty Jo High Point 

Bonnie J. (Mrs.) Asheville 

Doris Mitchell (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Dorothy Jean Smithfield 

Mrs. E. Leonidas Elon College 

Elizabeth H. (Mrs.) Kernersville 

Emma F. (Mrs.) Halifax 

Eugene Taft Greensboro 

Frances Brooks Burlington 

Mrs. James S Reidsville 

Jane Albemarle 

Leila Ruthef ordton 

Lessie Mt. Airy 

Margaret Wood (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Ona Estelle Massey (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Rebecca McCulloch (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Ruth Munzo (Mrs.) Greensboro 

M. Ruth Shelby 

Smythe, Pauline Greensboro 

Smythe, Philip C Marion, Va. 

Sneed, Virginia Elizabeth Thomasville 

Snell, Harry Parker Winston-Salem 

Snider, Janet Anita Greensboro 

Snow, Hugh A Winston-Salem 

Snow, Jeanne Dobson 

Solomon, Catherine Wrightsville Beach 

Somers, Howard Adam Walkertown 

Sontag, David Raleigh 



Student List 315 

Southern, Mrs. Clarence 

Sox, Sylvia Greensboro 

Spear, Karlyn Madison 

Spivey, Clara Geneva Elizabethtown 

Spratt, Wade Rankin Mt. Holly 

Spurgeon, Mary Emily Hillsboro 

Spurrier, Katie Lee Gastonia 

Stadler, Donald Jackson Reidsville 

Stanley, John David Stanleytown, Va. 

Stanton, Marion E Greensboro 

Staton, Eunice Evelyne Flat Rock 

Stevens, Betsy Greensboro 

Stevens, Jean Weaver Winston-Salem 

Stevens, Margaret Goldsboro 

Stevenson, Dorothy Holbert (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Stevenson, James Ray Winston-Salem 

Stewart, Dorothea Lou Buie's Creek 

Stokes, Juanita Loftin Greenville 

Stott, Flora Belle (Mrs.) Kittrell 

Stowe, June Carole Gastonia 

Strader, Lucy Kate Walnut Cove 

Straughan, Josephine M. (Mrs.) Siler City 

Strauss, Richard Elvyn Raleigh 

Stroud, Anne Faison 

Stroud, Mrs. D. R Mocksville 

Stroud, Peggy Jo Pink Hill 

Stroud, Virginia Jane Deep Run 

Stroupe, Nellie James Hamlet 

Stuart, Leanna Mebane 

Stuhl, Adrianne M Fayetteville 

Summers, Sara H. (Mrs.) Summerfield 

Swann, Alice Statesville 

Sykes, Connie Jeanette Whitakers 

Tannenbaum, Jeanne Greensboro 

Tate, Mary Sue Danville, Va. 

Tatum, Geraldine Bennett Vicksburg, Miss. 

Taylor, Tessie (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Teague, Emily Edwards Sanford 

Tedder, Jimmie , High Point 

Teeter, Margaret Kathleen (Mrs.) Weldon 

Terradas, Ana Maria Camaguey, Cuba 

Terradas, Graciela Camaguey, Cuba 

Terry, Lucille Charlotte 

Tew, Nancy Cornelia Godwin 

Thomas, John Guion Siler City 



316 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Thomas, Peggy George Raleigh 

Thomas, Virginia Dare Summerfield 

Thompson, Anna Kathryn Greensboro 

Thompson, Betty Allen Guilford College 

Thompson, Catherine Hester Leasburg 

Thompson, Jane Long Graham 

Thompson, Jane S. (Mrs.) Stoneville 

Thompson, Mabel Michael (Mrs.) Charlotte 

Thornton, Mae P. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Tice, Charles Lee Winston-Salem 

Tilton, Josephine Henrietta Washington, D. C. 

Todd, Ann Robinson Charlotte 

Toenes, George DePont Greensboro 

Townsend, Florence Kendrick Lumberton 

Trabulse, Ronald Alex Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Trembath, Janet Adelaide Laurel Hill 

Tripp, Anne Rivers Greensboro 

Tucker, Nancy Crouse Winston-Salem 

Turner, Ethel Ann Wallace 

Turner, Lois Deborah Wadesboro 

Tuttle, Myrtle E Greensboro 

Tysinger, Rosemary B. (Mrs.) High Point 

Underhill, Sue Harris Roanoke Rapids 

Underwood, David Sidney Trinity 

Utley, Lavonne Current (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Vanderpool, Lucille M. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Vann, Nancy Rich Square 

Vassar, Mrs. Walter Greensboro 

Vaughn, Janet Greensboro 

Vick, Myrtle Lee Wilmington 

Waddell, Margaret Dillon (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Waddell, Mildred Elizabeth High Point 

Wagoner, Jeanne Wadesboro 

Wake, Polly Joyce (Mrs.) Stoneville 

Walke, Cordelia French (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Walker, Geraldine Musselwhite (Mrs.) High Point 

Walker, Mildred Jean Bostic 

Walker, Nannie Bruce Burlington 

Walker, Nellie Carroll (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Walker, Ora Lee Scott (Mrs.) Burlington 

Walker, Winona Franklin Greensboro 

Wall, Lucille S Rutherford 

Wall, Mary Anne Wadesboro 



Student List 317 

Ward, Earlene Vestal (Mrs.) Asheboro 

Ward, Edna Johnson (Mrs.) Rosehill 

Ward, J. Mebane Greensboro 

Ward, Jean T. (Mrs.) Manteo 

Ward, Winfred H. (Mr.) Burlington 

Warren, Mildred Whitaker Benson 

Warren, William Pittman Candler 

Watson, Carolyn Louise Greensboro 

Watson, Linda Lee Bailey (Mrs.) Woodleaf 

Watson, Mary Hurst (Mrs.) Henderson 

Watson, Sara Thompson Winston-Salem 

Weadon, Frances Elaine Brown Summit 

Weaver, Janie Winston-Salem 

Weaver, Pattie Leigh Red Oak 

Weaver, Winston Cobb (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Webster, Mary E. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Weisberger, Edmund Alan New York, New York 

Weiss, Herman Herbert Woodmere, New York 

Welborn, Ivan Edward Thomasville 

Welborn, Marjorie B High Point 

Wellons, Diana Greensboro 

West, Betty Grey Warsaw 

West, Mary Evelyn Raleigh 

Westbrook, Mary C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Westmoreland, Lynn Greensboro 

Wharton, Mrs. C. R Greensboro 

White, Anne deLee Greensboro 

White, Loyce Janet Elizabeth Oity 

Whitehurst, Carl David Biltmore 

Whitson, Willa Mae Tipton Hill 

Widenhouse, Martha Anne Greensboro 

Wilhelm, Elizabeth L. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Wilkins, Nancy Greensboro 

Wilkinson, Elaine Asheville 

Wilkinson, Lillie Mae Greensboro 

Williams, Annie Laurie Matthews 

Williams, Frances Anne Prospect Hill 

Williams, Marshall Ann Fleming ( Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Williams, Mary Norman (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Williams, Nancy Greensboro 

Williams, Verla Lee Matthews 

Williard, Elizabeth Graham (Mrs.) Farmington 

Willis, Leah Twyne Greensboro 

Wilson, Ada C. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Wilson, Barbara Adele Greensboro 

Wilson, Charles Homer Winston-Salem 



318 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Wilson, Hulda S. (Mrs.) Spring Hope 

Wilson, Lou Gregory (Mrs.) Draper 

Wilson, Reba New Davidson 

Winchester, Estelle Shaw (Mrs.) Summerfield 

Winfield, Edna Lee Pantego 

Wingfield, George W Reidsville 

Winn, Elizabeth Graves Stanford (Mrs.) Chapel Hill 

Winslow, Louise Warren (Mrs.) Hurdle Mills 

Witty, Ruth Humphreys (Mrs.) Yancey ville 

Wolff, Donald George Woodmere, New York 

Womble, Beulah Byrd (Mrs.) Sanford 

Wood, Bessie Lou Winston-Salem 

Wood, Leona , Asheboro 

Wood, Lucy Ekholm (Mrs.) Siler City 

Woodson, Mabel Joanna Greensboro 

Woosley, Norma Lee Clemmons 

Wooten, Irene Enscore (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Wooten, Annie Saffold Durham 

Wootton, Grace P Winston-Salem 

Wray, Dorothy Mae Spindale 

Wray, Mary Walker (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Wright, Sarah Elizabeth Guilford College 

Wyatt, Richard Walter Hays 

Yates, Martha Moss Greensboro 

Yongue, Mrs. R. E Laurinburg 

York, Mary E Greensboro 

Young, Eleanor Clare High Point 

Zager, Marlyn Toby Greensboro 

Zett, Mae Van High Point 

Ziglar, Katie S. (Mrs.) Rural Hall 



SUMMER SESSION— 1952 

Burnsville Division 

Anderson, Evelyn Greensboro 

Anderson, Lacy W Greensboro 

Angel, Helen Burnsville 

Arnold, Yvonne Beaufort 

Arrington, Mary Stuart Southport 

Bennett, Hoyt Ramsaytown 

Bryson, Charlotte Anne Bryson City 

Burnette, Veo Pate (Mrs.) Marion 



Student List 319 

Campbell, Mitsy Columbus, Ga. 

Clarke, Ruth Abbott (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Click, Margaret Ann Elkin 

Conley, Sinclair Bell Burnsville 

Connet, John Lane Swannanoa 

Crowder, Mrs. R. S Silver Springs, Md. 

DiMauro, Marie Eleana Cromwell, Conn. 

Durham, Susan Winston-Salem 

Fairchild, Evelyn R Asheville 

Fonville, Jean Lane (Mrs.) Burlington 

Foushee, Ola Marie , Chapel Hill 

Fyne, Janet Stewart Sumter, S. C. 

Gatewood, Maude F Yanceyville 

Griffin, Evelyn Creech Marshville 

Hamrick, Frances M. (Mrs.) Burnsville 

Jennette, William S., Jr Elizabeth City 

Langley, Janet Sue High Point 

MacRae, Lillian (Mrs.) Burnsville 

Melsher, Jo Anne New York, N. Y. 

Miller, Irene E. (Mrs.) Marion 

Morrison, Virginia Katharine Laurel Hill 

Neal, Paul Hughes Charlotte 

Ogle, Robert Jackson Burnsville 

O'Hara, Anne Winnetka, 111. 

Oldham, Betty Lea Durham 

Peterson, Clyde (Mrs.) Burnsville 

Poteat, Vera B Spruce Pine 

Presnell, Betty Jean Burnsville 

Ray, Glenda Winston-Salem 

Schukraft, Terrill S Falls Church, Va. 

Stringer, Mary Evelyn Columbus, Miss. 

Sullivan, Margaret Sue Columbus, Ga. 

Summer, Emily Eugenia Yazoo City, Miss. 

Thornton, Neal Turner (Miss) Cordele, Ga. 



320 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Waldenmaier, Elizabeth Ann Burlington 

Wallace, Lucile Melton (Mrs.) Chester, S. C. 

Walton, Eugenia Wilson Charlotte 

Waters, Elsie Firesheets Florence, S. C. 

Watson, Barbara Ann Hamilton, Ohio 

Weber, Eleanor Salisbury 

Williams, Mary (Mrs.) Birmingham, Ala. 

Wimbish, Ava Helen Graham 

Young, Sheldon Richard Micaville 



Index 



321 



XL INDEX 



PAGE 

Absences 82 

Academic assistants 23 

Academic and Personnel Committee 30, 78 

Academic regulations 78 

Accreditation and membership 

of the College 34 

Administrative Council of the 

University 8 

Admission of students 

to advanced standing 63 

to the College 62 

general requirements 62, 70 

service women 63 

specific requirements 62 

Adivsers, see Class chairmen and 
academic advisers 

Alpha Kappa Delta 44 

Alumnae Association 44 

Art, Department of 84, 220 

Art, Dance, Drama, 

Interdepartmental Major 68 

Astronomy 145 

Attendance 82 

Auditing courses 79 

Bachelor of Arts degree, 

requirements for 64, 68, 196 

Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, 

requirements for 76 

Bachelor of Science in 
Business Education and 

Secretarial Administration 74 

Home Economics 72 

Music 71 

Nursing 75 

Physical Education 73 

Bachelor of Science degrees, 

curricula in 72, 73, 74, 75 

requirements for 72, 73, 74, 75 

Beta Beta Beta 44 

Biology, Department of 94 

Buildings and grounds 34 

Business Education and 
Secretarial Administration, 

courses in 100 

curricula in 74 

Department of 100 

Master's degree in 100, 105, 223 

Calendar, College 3 

Change of course 79 

Chemistry, Department of 108 

Choir 214 

Civic Music Association, see 

Lectures and Concerts 
Class, required number 

of students for 84 

Class chairmen and academic 

advisers 30, 77 

Classical Civilization, Department of.. 110 

Classification of students 80 

Clubs 44 

College, the history of '. '. 33 

Commercial Department 113 

Committees of the faculty, standing. . . 30 
Community, the College 40 



PAGE 

Conferences 47 

Counselors in residence halls 25 

Course, change of 79 

Creative Arts 220 

Credits 79 

Curry School 177, 224 

Dean's List 83 

Deficiencies 80 

DcsrrGGS 

conferred in 1952 227 

general requirements for .... 64, 68, 79 
kinds granted by the College ....34, 64 
requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts 64, 68, 196 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 76 

Bachelor of Science 72, 73, 74, 75 

Master's 100, 184, 216 

Departmental major 66 

Dramatics 42 

Dropping courses 79 

Economics, Department of 115 

Education 

courses in 177 

Master's degree 224 

School of 177 

Electives in Bachelor of Science 
and Bachelor of Music 
courses for 

Bachelor of Arts students .... 71 

English, Department of 118, 222 

Enrollment summary 240 

Entrance deficiencies 80 

Examinations 

entrance 62 

proficiency 82 

semester 81 

Exclusion from College 83 

Expenses 48, 218 

Extension 

credits 81 

Division of 47 

Extra hours of work 79 

Faculty and staff 9 

Fees 48, '2I8 

Fellowships and scholarships 53 

Fields of concentration 66 

French 166 

Freshman-Sophomore requirements ... 65 
Freshman Week 78 

General regulations 79 

General requirements 70 

Geography, Department of 134 

German, Department of 135 

Government of the College 40 

Grade of courses 65, 66, 84 

Grades, see Reports 

Graduate assistants 24 

Graduate School 216 

Graduate Work, see different 

departments and Graduate School 
Greek Ill 



322 



Index 



page 

Health 

Department of 137 

Service in 39 

History 136 

History and Political Science, 

Department of 136 

Home Economics 

courses in 185 

curricula in 72 

Foundation 45 

Master's degree in 185, 224 

School of 184 

Honors, graduation with 83 

Honors Work 67 

Infirmary 39 

Interdepartmental majors 66, 68, 69 

Italian 172 

Junior-Senior requirements 66 

Laboratories and studios 35 

Laboratory fees 51 

Laboratory technician 66 

Latin 112 

Lectures and concerts 42 

Library 

extension service 47 

staff of 24 

the 37 

Library Education (Science) 180 

Loan funds 57 

Majors 66 

Master's degree 100, 184, 216 

Mathematics, Department of 143 

Medical service, see Health 
Music 

choir 214 

contest festival 214 

courses in 197, 221 

curricula in 197 

degrees in 196 

Department of, see School of 

library 214 

Music Education Club 215 

orchestra 214 

recitals 213 

School of 196 

News Bureau 47 

Nursing 

curriculum in 75 

degree in 75 

Officers 

emeriti 9 

of administration 9 

of instruction 10 

other officers 26 

Omicron Nu 44 

Organizations 43 

Phi Alpha Theta 44 

Phi Beta Kappa 43, 238 

Philosophy, Department of 146 

Physical Education, 

courses in 147, 222 



PAGE 

curricula in 73 

Department of 147 

Physics, Department of 159 

Pi Kappa Lambda 44, 215 

Placement Office 46 

Play-Likers 43 

Political Science 142 

Premedical students 66 

Preprofessional program 70 

Proficiency examinations 82 

Promotion 47 

Psychology, Department of 163 

Publications 46 

Public Relations 47 

Quality Points 80 

Radio and television 43 

Recreation Association 44 

Recreation, Interdepartmental Major . . 69 

Re-examinations 81 

Registration 78 

Regulations, general 79 

Religion 40 

Reports 82 

Residence 48 

Residence halls 37 

Residence requirements 80 

Romance Languages, Department of.. 166 

Rooms, reservation of 62 

Scholarships , 53 

Secretarial Administration, see 

Business Education and 

Secretaries and other assistants 27 

Self-help 46 

Senior requirements 66 

Service women 63 

Sigma Alpha 44 

Sigma Delta Pi 44 

Social life 41 

Social Work, Preprofessional Program 70 

Societies 43 

Sociology, Department of 173, 226 

Sophomore requirements 66 

Spanish 170 

Special students 51 

Sports 42 

Student aid 46 

Student health 39 

Student load 79 

Students, number of, see 

Enrollment summary 
Studies, see Laboratories and 
Summer Session, Correspondence, 

and Extension credits 81 

Tau Psi Omega 44 

Textbooks 52 

Training School, see Curry School 

Transcript of record 83 

Trustees 

Board of 5 

Executive Committee of 5 

University sermons 41 

Withdrawal from College ,'. 83 

Y. W. C. A 41